Saturday, 21 May 2016


Bernard Picart (1673-1733)
"Plate 58", 1733, from a set of figure studies, numbered 58 to 67, that (according to Dimier/Duportal) used to be bound together and dated 1733
Etching and mezzotint in brown ink on thick cream wove paper
Size: (sheet) 35.1 x 23.3 cm; (plate) 32.4 x 18.6 cm
Inscribed indistinctly at top right, "58"; lettered below the image with production detail: "Académie dessinée et gravée par B. Picart", and detail on the original's provenance (coll. Walraven in Amsterdam)
The British Museum offers the following description of this print: "Figure study: nude woman, whole-length, facing front, flying among clouds with arms spread, 1733." (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1538342&partId=1&searchText=picart&images=true&page=2)
Dimier 1928 947-956
Condition: strong and well-inked impression with margins. There is very pale scattered spotting otherwise the sheet is in good condition for its age.

I am selling this original, rare, large and visually arresting etching by Picart for AU$88 (currently US$63.51/EUR56.60/GBP43.78 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this superb academic study of a heaven borne woman, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Bernard Picart is famous for his engraved and etched reproductions of paintings and drawings of the great masters. See, for example, Picart's superb reproductive prints of drawings by Salvator Rosa and Nicolas Poussin that I've posted earlier. This print, however, reproduces a drawing executed entirely by Picart's own hand. Beyond allowing viewers the rare opportunity to examine very closely this master's skills as a draughtsman—and there are issues that I see as problematic regarding ambiguity in the treatment of contour marks rendering the figure's left thigh—for me, the real delight of this print is seeing how Picart uses etched line work over a film of lightly laid mezzotint rocker marks.





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