Tuesday, 31 May 2016


Godfrey Miller (Godfrey Clive Miller) (1893-1964)
Slade figure study of a male torso, c. 1930–34
Stamped with John Henshaw’s studio stamp of Godfrey Miller’s estate and numbered “S113”
Pencil on buff coloured paper
Size: (image within the window mount) 19 x 8.2 cm; (frame) 49 x 35.4 cm.
Condition: the sheet is trimmed irregularly at the top edge; the timber frame is unvarnished and has minor signs of its age (i.e. yellow oxidisation, insect specks and dustiness) and the backing sheet should be replaced.


I am selling this very early and rare drawing (in the sense that Miller destroyed/culled most of his early drawings) for AU$900 (currently US$654.56/EUR588.84/GBP451.89 at the time of posting this drawing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.  

If you are interested in purchasing this original and very early drawing by one of Australia’s most famous artists, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


(Note that this photo has reflections that are not a part of the drawing)

For me this life class study of a male nude has slight overtones of androgyny and I had to think hard why this is so.

The first reason that sprung to mind is that Miller has erased the arms, legs and face of the figure: arguably, a masculine way of looking at attractive females.

There is also the curious failure to draw the genitals: a missing feature that is possibly a symptom of the age of censure from which this drawing arose rather than a delight in castration.

The third reason has to do with the sensitive treatment of the contrapposto pose (i.e. the S-shaped rhythm passing through the figure) in that, Miller seems to lovingly/tentatively/softly stroke the edges of forms rather than using emphatic/manly/unambiguous marks to portray him. (My sincere apologies if any of the above descriptions of gender attributes are inaccurate or too sweeping in their categorisations.)



Godfrey Miller (Godfrey Clive Miller) (1893-1964)
Slade figure study of a female torso, c. 1930–34
Stamped with John Henshaw’s studio stamp of Godfrey Miller’s estate and numbered “S113”
Pencil on buff coloured paper
Size: (image within the window mount) 9.7 x 6.9 cm; (frame) 40.5 x 34.8 cm.
Condition: the sheet has a pinhole on the right side of the figure; there is a bubble in the Perspex/acrylic sheet; the timber frame is unvarnished and has minor signs of its age (i.e. yellow oxidisation, insect specks and dustiness) and the backing sheet should be replaced.


I am selling this framed very early and rare drawing (in the sense that Miller destroyed/culled most of his early drawings) for AU$900 (currently US$654.56/EUR588.84/GBP451.89 at the time of posting this drawing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this original and very early drawing by one of Australia’s most famous artists, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Although this early drawing by Godfrey Miller is an academic study executed from direct observation during a life class, it has many of the hallmarks of his mature works. By this I mean that the line work shows Miller visually searching for the structure of the figure’s form in a way that a blind person might “feel” the figure’s surface tensions, curves, soft and hard spots. This approach is often described—at least by me—as a haptic approach as opposed to a strictly visual one. What is especially lovely to see is the way that Miller phrases his lines by varying the pressure on the pencil so that the lines flow in the pictorial space of the image or punctuate important landmarks like the figure’s navel.



Hans Heysen (1877–1968)
"Turning the Plough”, 1918 (printed 1920 in an edition of 55)

Etching (from a zinc plate) with plate-tone on fine cream laid paper, signed in pencil (lower-left margin)
Size: (sheet) 15.8 x 12.1 cm; (plate) 7.3 x 8 cm
See detailed description of this print: http://www.printsandprintmaking.gov.au/impressions/5391/

Condition: marvellous well-inked impression with plate tone and retroussage (i.e. ink lightly dragged from the etched lines), signed in pencil with a thin spot in lower margin (verso) and remnants of mounting hinges (verso); otherwise in excellent condition. There is an ink stamp monogram "KG" (verso).


I am selling this iconic image—and one seldom seen for sale—from the Heidelberg School, acclaimed masterwork by Heysen for AU$2300 in total (currently US$1673.48/EUR1504.78/GBP1155.54 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this image with all the strength and heroic stature of a Millet (without the melancholy), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This is Hans Heysen’s most famous print and, arguably, one of the most famous prints in Australia. In my opinion, it is also one of the few images in the genre of rural work that can hold its own commanding presence even when placed beside the works of legendary masters like Jean-Francois Millet (1814–75). In short, this is a masterwork.

Regarding its status in the oeuvre of Heysen, Hendrik Kolenberg and Anne Ryan offer the following account: “The drawing for this etching on a sheet of studies of a man ploughing with a two horse team, in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia. The study and etching are about the same size. A larger, fully developed charcoal drawing of the same subject was made after the etching and the Wynne Prize winning watercolour 'The toilers' in 1920. The two draught horses in these works are Polly and Jack, who were regularly brought in to plough and cultivate the soil at Heysen's property 'The Cedars' at Hahndorf. Another watercolour of them ploughing is in the Gallery's collection. Heysen was able to proof his etchings on his lithographic press, but the edition was printed by Lionel Lindsay, who encouraged Heysen to etch. 'Turning the plough' was included in the first exhibition of the Painter-Etchers Society in 1921 …” (Hendrik Kolenberg and Anne Ryan, “Australian prints from the Gallery's collection”, AGNSW, 1998).




Armand Berton (1854–1917)
"Tête de Jeune Femme” [Head of a Young Woman]

Original chine collé lithograph on buff coloured wove paper with wide margins and signed in the plate.
Size: (sheet) 50.4 x 33 cm; (chine collé image) 21.5 x 16.8 cm

Condition: strong chine collé impression with pencil addition to the upper framing edge (suggesting that this is a proof and annotated in pencil by the artist). The sheet has light unevenness arising from the applique process and is slightly dusty with a bumped lower-right corner.


I am selling this delicate and very romantic original lithograph for AU$116 in total (currently US$84.40/EUR75.86/GBP58.27 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this soft, dreamily enigmatic portrait, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


I originally purchased this original lithograph simply because the print looked beautiful and I’ve a soft spot for demure dreamy young women. There is something strangely compelling about this print that goes beyond the charm of the portrayed young lady and it’s all about the strong borderline framing the portrait.

In one sense this frame makes my view of the long haired beauty seem very intimate and constricted. In another sense the curved corners of the frame gives the impression—at least for me—of some sort of psychological weight bearing down on her. There is also a graphic element that is not really a part of the frame but which also plays a role: the pencil additions surrounding the lithograph at the top edge of the chine collé presumably made by the artist in this proof print. These pencil marks give an emphatically eye-catching broken edge to the upper portion of the frame line suggesting—again from a personal viewpoint—the ephemeral spirit of the portrayed subject; a bit like a faded old photograph framed within its crisp border as a negative.





Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806)
"Ange Tenant une Palme et une Couronne" [Angel Carrying a Palm and a Crown], 1761/65 after a painting made by Annibal Carrache (1560–1609) for the Piacenza cathedral

Etching on fine laid paper.
Size: (image) 8 x 12.9 cm; (sheet) 8.9 x 14 cm; (frame) 41 x 44 cm
State: ii (of ii)
Lettered with location and name of the author of the original painting,and signed on plate: 'frago sc' and numbered "14"
Baudicou 14; Wildenstein (1956) XX (Bau.14)

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
"An angel standing with a palm leaf in his left hand and crowning a martyr from the other hand; on the right, a man holding a palm leaf." (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1360991&partId=1&searchText=Fragonard+etching&people=124749&page=1)

Condition: crisp lifetime impression of the utmost rarity, cut on the plate mark on laid paper in excellent condition. Framed with a simple limed wood moulding under 3mm acrylic sheet (not glass) with a conservation mount. (Note: this etching has been photographed in its frame and so there are reflections)


I am selling this framed and exceptionally rare lifetime impression by Fragonard for a total cost of AU$439 (currently US$317.22/EUR284.66/GBP219.04 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this rare original Fragonard, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make your payment easy.

This print has been sold


Seldom does one even see an original Fragonard etching and certainly not one as beautiful as this. The print may be small in physical size, but the lightness of the artist's touch and the confidence of drawing showcases Fragonard's stature as one of the most famous French masters of the Rocco period.

The subject is based on Annibal Carrache's design for the ceiling dome of the cathedral at Piacenza. If anyone has had the same opportunity as the cook and I have had to be stranded in the small narrow street medieval and now industrial town of Piacenza waiting for our gardener to recover in hospital, I suspect that seeing the grandeur of such a design would be like a glimpse into heaven.

Be mindful when looking at this image that there is a big difference between an angel carrying a palm and crown designed for a ceiling and one designed for a wall. A good design for an angel destined for a ceiling should make her appear to float rather than fall and this angel floats marvellously.






Achille Isidore Gilbert (1828–99)

“Lutteurs” [wrestlers] (after Jean Alexandre Joseph Falguière [1831–1900]), published in “L’Art”, 1876

Etching on wove paper with margins as published
Size: (sheet) 42.2 x 28.4 cm; (plate) 27.1 x 20.9 cm; (image) 21.3 x 16.6 cm

Lettered above image: “SALON DE 1875” and below the image: (left) “A. Falguières pinx. / L’Art.”; (centre) “LUTTEURS.”; (right) “A. Gilbert sculp. / Imp. A. Salmon.” IFF 40; Beraldi 1885-92 70

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Two wrestlers, with beyond spectators sitting in stands; after Falguières; plate from 'L'Art'. 1876” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3368365&partId=1&searchText=lutteurs&page=1)
Condition: superb impression in pristine condition.


I am selling this finely executed etching of wrestlers for the total cost of AU$104 (currently US$75.52/EUR67.67/GBP51.56 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this forest scene exemplifying the spirit of the Barbizon School, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This etching by Gilbert is a graphic translation of a painting by Falguière, exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1875 and now in the collection of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

For those who are interested in fight scenes, I wish to draw a comparison between this etching of struggling wresters and the lithograph of pugilists battling for supremacy by George Bellows: “Stag at Sharkey’s”—arguably one of the most famous American prints of the 20th century.

At first glance there are many similarities connecting these two prints. For example, both prints showcase two figures joined in combat as the centre of attention. After a cursory glance, however, the differences become more apparent.

Beyond the strength of Bellow’s composition where the arrangement of the spectators augment the rhythm of the battling man-stags, there is a difference in how the frenzy of the fighters is portrayed. In the case of Gilbert’s etching, the figures are carefully balanced so that their distribution of physical weight makes them appear stable (i.e. they are unlikely to fall over). By contrast, Bellows makes the clash of his fighters top-heavy by “playing down”/minimising the viewer’s interest in the role that the fighter’s legs play in supporting the men’s weight.

From a personal standpoint, what Gilbert portrays is a TIMELESS moment in the fighters’ battle; whereas, what Bellows portrays is a SPECIFIC moment of fighters colliding mid-flight. 





Monday, 30 May 2016


Adolphe Martial Potémont (1828–83) (aka Adolphe Martial and Adolphe Martial- Potémont)

“Vieux Chênes au Bas-Bréau” [old oak trees in Bas-Bréau—a section of Fontainebleau forest], Plate 11, 1878, published by Alfred Cadart (1828–75) in “L'Eau-Forte”

Etching on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 38 x 34.7 cm; (plate) 31 x 26 cm; (image) 29.5 x 24.5 cm

Inscribed with the artists initials/monogram at the lower left edge of the image and lettered below the image: (lower left) “A. P. Martial. del. et sc.”; (lower centre) “VIEUX CHÊNES AU BAS-BRÉAU”; (lower right) “Vve A. Cadart Edit Imp. 56 Bard Haussmann Paris."


Condition: marvellously rich and well-inked impression with good margins. The sheet has glue stains in the margins (recto) but is otherwise in good condition (i.e. there are no tears, foxing or blemishes beyond the glue marks).


I am selling this magnificent image of ancient oaks in the Fontinebleau Forest made famous by the Barbizon school of artists for the total cost of AU$132 (currently US$94.81/EUR85.13/GBP64.85 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this forest scene exemplifying the spirit of the Barbizon School, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


I purchased this print many years ago for the simple reason: it was beautiful—stunningly beautiful! I then sought to acquire more prints by the artist with the mistaken idea that his other prints would be equally richly worked and gorgeous. Sadly, I discovered that his other images were not so romantic. Indeed, I was somewhat shocked to discover that his earlier work, featuring mainly architectural views, matched what FL Leipnik in his unreserved assessment of artists in “A History of French Etching from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day” (1924) describes as “indifferent etching and lack of feeling …” (p. 125).

Regardless of what may be seen as emotional dryness of his earlier prints (e.g. his series of 300 etchings of Paris published in three volumes between 1862 and 1866 and his series of 12 etchings of “The Women of Paris during the War”), this particular print along with another landscape etching, “La Montée”, earned the praise of Leipnik who perceived it as having “incomparably greater merit” (ibid).




Sunday, 29 May 2016



De Demanne after the illustration by Deshayes published in Paris by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Duchesne in "Guide de la Culture des Bois, ou Herbier Forestier," (the atlas contains 64 lithographs), 1826

“Pin sauvage dit d’Ecosse ou de Genêve” [Wild Pine from Scotland or Geneva], 1825–26
Lithograph on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 42 x 27.4 cm

Inscribed (lower right) “Deshayes delt.”; (lower centre) “Pin sauvage dit d’Ecosse ou de Genêve.”; (lower right) “Lith: de Demanne.”

Condition: rich impression with generous margins. There is light spotting, otherwise the sheet is in excellent condition for its age.



I am selling this exceptionally fine lithograph along with the next lithograph I am listing, “Pin maritime ou de Bordeaux” by the same artist, (i.e. two lithographs by Demanne after Deshayes) for AU$110 in total (currently US$79.04/EUR71.10/GBP54.05 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this pair of botanical drawings, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.




De Demanne after the illustration by Deshayes published in Paris by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Duchesne in "Guide de la Culture des Bois, ou Herbier Forestier," (the atlas contains 64 lithographs), 1826

“Pin maritime ou de Bordeaux” [Maritime Pine], 1825–26
Lithograph on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 42 x 27.4 cm

Inscribed (lower right) “Deshayes delt.”; (lower centre) “Pin maritime ou de Bordeaux.”; (lower right) “Lith: de Demanne.”

Condition: rich impression with generous margins. There is spotting, otherwise the sheet is in good condition for its age.




Recently I had an interesting discussion with a long-distance internet friend about a woodblock print by the legendary Japanese printmaker, Hiroshige. The point of interest in our short discussion concerned Hiroshige’s choice to separate the key subject of the print (viz. travellers on horseback and walking) from the representation of falling snow depicted behind them. My standpoint was that by showing the figures set against a background of falling snow was not as visually satisfying as immersing the figures within a veil of snow falling all around them.

If I may now link that discussion with this pair of prints, I wish to suggest that the artists who drew these botanical illustrations (Demanne, the lithographer and Deshayes, the designer) are like artists who allow falling snow to be in front of the key subject. What I mean by this comment—especially seeing that there is clearly no snow featured in the prints—is that these artists have represented the true way that pine cones and needles are attached to their stems and they have achieved this realism by ensuring that features in the front (i.e. closer to the viewer) obscure those behind. Although I would be hesitant to propose that true scientific objectivity is about not showing everything, in these illustrations there may be the case for an argument.


Gilles Demarteau (1722–76) after Jean-Baptiste Le Prince (1734–81)
“Plate 1, Book 1”, 1773, from “Principes Du Dessin Dans Le Genre Du Paysage”
Crayon-manner stippled etching in sanguine ink on coarse laid paper
Size: (sheet) 43.5 x 30.2 cm; (plate) 26.9 x 20 cm

Inscribed within the plate (upper-centre edge) “Planche premiere. Livre 1 er.”; (lower left) “Le Prince”; (lower right) “Demarteau”; (lower centre) “Pour acquérir la facilite’ de dessiner le paysage, il faut commencer par etudier separément les feuilles de divers arbres propres à la peinture, sans cela il seroit impossible d’y donner le caractere; voyez q, 2, 3, on en dessinera ensuite plusieurs ensemble, à peu-près comme dans la figre 4,avec láttention de les placer de maniere que les masses d’ombre quélles produiront soient assez considerable pour faire valoir les masses de clair.” [Google Translation: To acquire facilitates' to draw the landscape, we must first separate study of the leaves of various trees suitable for painting, otherwise it would be impossible to give the character; see 1, 2, 3, then draw more together, nearly as in figure 4, with attention to the place of way that the masses of which are quite considerable shadow occur to assert the masses of light.] / A Paris chés Demarteau Graveur du Roi, rue de la Pelterie à la Cloche.”

Condition: crisp and well-inked impression with irregular margins (as published). There are minor handling creases otherwise in excellent condition for its age (i.e. the sheet is clean and without tears, stains or foxing).


This print has been sold




Gilles Demarteau (1722–76) after Jean-Baptiste Le Prince (1734–81)
“Plate 3, Book 2”, 1773, from “Principes Du Dessin Dans Le Genre Du Paysage”
Crayon-manner stippled etching in sanguine ink on coarse laid paper
Size: (sheet) 43.4 x 29.9 cm; (plate) 30.5 x 23.6 cm

Inscribed within the plate (upper-centre edge) “Planche 3 eme. Livre 2 eme”; (lower left) “Le Prince”; (lower right) “Demarteau”; (lower centre) “Ceci est une suite de ce qui à été demontré dans La Planche 2e. du Livre 2e. A est un jeune Hètre vu a trente pas. La forme particuliere des feuilles échape à la vuë, et l’on appercoit que la tournure généale de l’arbre, c’est à dire le caractere particulier ou la direction de ses branches.” [Google Translation: This is a result of what was shown in the second board. 2nd Book. A is a young thirty Beechwood seen not. The particular shape of the leaves an Escape to the view, and we perceive that généale turn of the tree, ie the particular character or direction of its branches.] / A Paris chés Demarteau Graveur du Roi, rue de la Pelterie à la Cloche.”

Condition: crisp and well-inked impression with irregular margins (as published). There are minor handling creases otherwise in excellent condition for its age (i.e. the sheet is clean and without tears, stains or foxing).


This print has been sold






Allaert van Everdingen (1621–75)
“Two Men in a Doorway”, 1773 (18th century impression), from the series, “Twelve landscapes” (H.40-51)
Etching on fine laid paper
Size: (sheet) 10.1 x 14 cm
Inscribed with the artist’s monogram (lower right corner) “AVE”.
Bartsch II.186.48; Hollstein 48.II; Dytuit 48.III

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Two men resting at the door of a timber-built cottage; in left foreground; a dead tree and its broken trunk next to a large rock at centre; at right view of a wooded landscape; from a series of twelve plates.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1632462&partId=1&searchText=Allaert+van+Everdingen&page=5)

Condition: crisp but slightly silvery impression with margins around the borderline, but trimmed before plate marks and in good condition. There are remnants of mounting hinges and pencil notes from previous collectors (verso).


I am selling this early etching capturing the spirit of the Nordic landscape for AU$115 in total (currently US$82.63/EUR74.34/GBP56.51 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold




Allaert van Everdingen (1621–75)
“Two Boats Approaching a Hut”, c. 1650 (lifetime impression), from the series, “Four landscapes” (H.30-33).
Etching on fine laid paper
Size: (sheet) 10.2 x 12.9 cm
State iii (of iii). Bartsch II.177.32; Hollstein 32.III

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Two men mooring boats on a river bank; next to a group of houses at centre; a man on a horse-drawn carriage on the country road at left; a castle on a hill on the far bank at right; from a series of four plates.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1632008&partId=1&searchText=Allaert+van+Everdingen&page=2)

Condition: strong, well-inked lifetime impression with no wear to the plate with margins around the borderline, but trimmed on or before plate marks and in excellent condition. There are remnants of mounting hinges and notes from previous collectors (verso).


I am selling this rare, lifetime impression capturing the spirit of the Nordic landscape for AU$225 in total (currently US$161.66/EUR145.44/GBP110.56 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print has been sold




When I was looking at these two landscapes, the thought occurred to me about the difference between Everdingen’s experience of village life in the mountains of Sweden and Norway and my very limited experience of small towns in the mountains of Australia. One of the big differences that I perceive is the site where folk in the mountains of Europe tend to situate their houses compared to those living in the mountains of Australia. If I may propose a broad generalisation (that may or may not be true and I am interested in readers’ comments): the Europeans choose to build houses in the mountain valleys with many streams, trees and boulders, whereas the Australians choose the mountain tops so that they can see everything—except nearby streams, trees and boulders.