Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 31 July 2020

Joseph Parrocel’s etching, “Jesus Heals the Sick by Laying His Hands on Them,” 1661


Joseph Parrocel (1646–1704)

“Jesus Heals the Sick by Laying His Hands on Them” (aka “Jesus Christ guerit plusieurs malades, imposant les mains sur chacun d'eux” [Robert-Dumesnil title), 1661, plate 19 from the series of forty plates, “Les Miracles de la Vie de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ” (The Miracles of the Life of Our Lord Jesus Christ).

Etching on laid paper trimmed within the plate mark (with partial loss of the lower right biblical reference) and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 15.6 x 118.3 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline along the lower edge: (left) “J. Parrossel. jn. et fe. C.P.R”
Inscribed on plate below the image borderline: (centre) “guerit plusieurs maladies, imposant les mains fur chacun” (cures several illnesses, laying hands on everyone); (lower right corner and partially trimmed) “St Luc Ch. 4”.

State i (of ii) lifetime impression of the etched state of the plate before it was later engraved in the second state (see discussion further below).

Robert-Dumesnil in the catalogue raisonné for this set of prints advises that the first state impressions of “pure etching” are “rare.”
Arguably, this impression is very likely to have been printed by the artist’s own hand as the inventory of his possession (dated 16 July, 1704) reveals that the artist possessed in the cellar of his house a “press in oak wood” to print his plates.

Robert-Dumesnil 1838 59 (19) (A P F Robert-Dumesnil 1838, “Le Peintre-Graveur Français,” vol. 3, Paris, p. 275, cat. no. 59 [19]: see https://archive.org/details/bnf-bpt6k65575384/page/n289/mode/2up).

Robert-Dumesnil in the catalogue raisonné (1838) offers the following description of this print:
(Transl.) “Our Lord is standing on a staircase, in the middle of the back, from where he works this miracle on a crowd of sick people stretched out in the foreground and in the background” (p. 266).

Condition: a superb, richly inked and well-printed impression of the utmost rarity—I have been unable to locate another copy of this print in any of the major museum repositories (including the Louvre)—trimmed within the platemark with partial loss of the biblical reference (St. Luke Ch. 4) and backed with a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this first state etching before it was later “finished” with engraving, for AU$235 in total (currently US$168.86/EUR142.53/GBP128.36 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally rare old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Thursday, 30 July 2020

Hieronymus Wierix’s engraving, “Invidia,” 1563–before 1612, after Philips Galle


Hieronymus Wierix (aka Jerome Wierix; Hieronymus Wierx) (1553–1619)

“Invidia” (Envy) (aka "L'Envie"), 1563–before 1612, plate four from the series of eight plates (including the title plate), “The Seven Vices” (aka “VII Peccatorum Capitalium”; “Les Péchés Capiteaux” [The Capital Sins]), after the design by Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612) and published by Philips Galle in Antwerp in the first edition (this impression is from the first edition) and published later in a second edition by Philips’ son, Theodoor Galle (aka Theodor Galle; Dirck Galle) (1571–1633).

Note that the Latin text (“Vita cranium, Sanitas cordis: putredo ossium Invidia”) is proverb 14:30 from “Biblia Sacra Vulgata”: (transl.) “The life of the mind; rottenness of envy.”

Engraving on fine laid paper with a small margin around the plate mark.
Size: (sheet) 20.3 x 14.7 cm; (plate) 18.9 x 13.5 cm; (image borderline above text box) 16.2 x 13 cm.
Lettered on plate within the image borderline: (upper centre) “INVIDIA.”; (along lower edge of oval frame) "Phls Galle invent. et excud. Hireon. Wierx sculp."
Lettered and numbered on plate below the image borderline: “Vita cranium, Sanitas cordis: putredo ossium Invidia./ Proverb. 14./ 4”.
State i (of ii?) 

Mauquoy-Hendrickx 1376 (Marie Mauquoy-Hendrickx 1978, “Les Estampes des Wierix ... Catalogue Raisonné [Part II], Brussels, Bibliotheque Royale Albert, p. 246, cat. no. 1376, ill. p. 181); New Hollstein (Wierix) 1762 (Zsuzsanna van Ruyven-Zeman [comp.] 2004, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts ca. 1450–1700: The Wierix family: part VIII”, vol. 66, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision Rijksprentenkabinet, p. 99, cat. no. 1762); Alvin 1300 (I) (L Alvin 1866, “Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre des trois frères Jan, Jérome et Antoine Wierix”, Brussels).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate 4: Envy. Bust of an old woman eating an apple and with snakes around her neck, in an oval; four putti in each corner, three eating apples; after Philips Galle. Engraving”

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum proposing that the personification of Envy (the old lady) is eating a heart rather than an apple:
(Transl.) “Bust of the female personification of Envy (Invidia). She bites a heart and holds a snake in her hand. The image is set in a cartouche surrounded by putti. In the margin, a Bible quote from Spr. 14 in Latin”

Condition: superb/near faultless, lifetime impression with a small margin around the platemark. The lower right corner is thin (if the print is lifted to the light) otherwise the sheet is in excellent/museum quality condition for its considerable age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, stains, foxing or significant signs of handling).

I am selling this remarkably fine lifetime impression from the first edition, for AU$322 (currently US$229.74/EUR195.60/GBP176.93 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this superb and very rare engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Wednesday, 29 July 2020

Hendrik Goltzius/Philips Galle’s engraving, “The Dispersal of the Spanish Foe”, 1583, after Jan van der Straet


Formerly attributed to Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617) reattributed to Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)

“The Dispersal of the Spanish Foe” (TIB title) (aka “Giovanni de' Medici presso il fiume Adda mette in fuga l'esercito spagnolo”), 1583, plate 4 from the series, “History of the Medici” (aka “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi”) after Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Ioannes Stradanus) (1523–1605), published by Philips Galle in Antwerp.

Note that this is a lifetime impression from the first edition published in 1583, before the order of the plates were renumbered for the second edition and the change of the publisher’s name from Philips Galle (Philippus Galle) to his grandson, Johannes Galle, for the third edition.

This print may be viewed in its context with the other plates as published in 1583 at Archive.org:

Engraving on laid paper trimmed with a thread margin around the platemark.
Size: (sheet) 22.3 x 29.6 cm; (image borderline) 20.2 x 29.5 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower centre) "Johannes Stradanus inuentor/ Philippus Galle excudit".
Numbered and lettered below the image borderline: “4 Ioh. Med. In Adduam flumen equum iminittit paucisqz illum secutis ad oppositam ripam/ Hispanos hostes metu perterritos in fugam vertit”
State i (of iii)

TIB 5601.102:4 (Arno Dolders [ed.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, New York, Abaris Books, p. 387, cat. no. [5601].102:4); New Hollstein Dutch 491-1 (2) (Manfred Sellink & Marjolein Leesberg [comp.] 2001, “The New Hollstein : Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision, p. 193; p. 202 [ill.], cat. no. 491).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The dispersion of the Spanish Enemy, on the Adda under Giovanni de' Medici; an army wades across a river towards its fleeing enemy on the other side of the bank. 1583”

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum:
(Transl.) “Giovanni de Medici, called 'dalle Bande Nere', chases the Spanish army together with his horsemen. The print has a Latin caption and is part of a series about the family history of the De 'Medici family”

Condition: well-printed lifetime impression showing no sign of wear to the printing plate, trimmed along the plate mark with a thread margin. The sheet is in an excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this graphically strong and near faultless lifetime impression published in 1583, for AU$342 (currently US$245.82/EUR208.87/GBP189.63 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this superb and very rare engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Tuesday, 28 July 2020

Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine’s pair of miniature etchings from “Tètes Polonaises,” 1774–1789


Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine (aka Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gordaine) (1745–1830)

(left) “Head of a Man with Short Hair,” 1778, from the series of 15 plates, “Tètes Polonaises” (Polish Heads) (Hillemacher 64–78), inscribed on plate (left) “N[f]/ 1778”, state ii (of ii) with monogram and date, Hillemacher 75 (Frederic Hillemacher 1848, “Catalogue des estampes qui composent l'oeuvre de Jean-Pierre Norblin,” Paris, Lacrampe et Fertiaux, p. 40, cat. no. 75); see the description of this print at the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1853-0312-307).

(right) “Head of a Man with a Fur Cap in Profile, Facing Left,” 1774–1789, from the series, “Tètes Polonaises”, state i (of i), Hillemacher 73; see the description of this print at the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1853-0312-312).

Etchings on ivory wove (China) paper with small margins and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheets cut unevenly) 3.5 x 3.1 cm; (left oval plate) 1.8 x 2.1 cm; (right oval plate) 2.2 x 2.6 cm.

The Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA) offers the following insight about the artist:
“Jean-Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine was a French painter and printmaker active in Poland in the late 18th century. Norblin's charming miniature etchings, representing mostly male heads, street sellers, and vagabonds, reflect both in subject and technique the profound influence of Rembrandt's prints. Norblin was also drawn to Polish subjects, capturing the unfamiliar, exotic world around him in his depictions of men with colossal fur hats and curled moustaches, Cossacks, and Polish historical figures”

Condition: well-printed impressions with small margins laid onto separate support sheets of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. Both sheets have a spot stain in the margin and the right print has a restored corner.

I am selling this pair of very small jewels of etching—the oval images are approximately the size of a thumbnail—by one of the most important artists of the Enlightenment in Poland for AU$500 in total for the pair (currently US$356.69/EUR304.44/GBP277.26 at the time of posting these printa) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this pair of miniature masterworks from the 1700s following in the tradition of Rembrandt's use of dramatic (chiaroscuro) lighting, but where the rendering of the faces occupy no more space than the size of a pea, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This pair of prints has been sold







Monday, 27 July 2020

Abraham Genoels’ etching, “Landscape with a Waterfall,” c1675


Abraham Genoels (aka Archimedes; Abraham II Genoels; A. G. Genoel) 91640–1723)

“Landscape with a Waterfall” (aka “La chute d’eau”), 1660–1690, the fifth plate from the series of six etchings (TIB 60–65), “River Landscapes” (aka “Rivierlandschappen”), published by Adam François van der Meulen (aka Adam Frans van der Meulen; Adam François Vandermeulen) (1632– 1690) in Paris with royal privilege from Louis XIV (King of France).

This is an impression taken by La Chalcographie du Louvre in 1804 and has the blind-stamp of the Chalcography below the platemark at centre.

Etching on wove paper with wide margins, blind-stamped with the seal of La Chalcographie du Louvre, and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 30.3 x 43 cm; (plate) 21.7 x 28.4 cm; (image borderline) 20.8 x 27.7 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) "A. Genoels, fe."; (right) "V. Meulen, ex. Cum priuilegio Regis."
State iii/iv(?) with the publisher’s details.

TIB 5(4).60(362) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1979, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists”, vol. 5, New York, Abaris Books, p. 353, cat. no. 64 [364]); Bartsch IV.364.64.III; Regnault-Delalande 1817 149.64; Weigel 1843 211.64.III; Hollstein 64.III.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Rocky landscape with waterfall at right, trees and mountains in the background; third state with publisher's address; from a series of six prints”

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: near faultless impression blind stamped in 1804 by the Chalcography of the Louvre, with wide margins laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this sensitively executed masterpiece of 17th century landscape etching that is—to my eyes—radiant with light, for the total cost of AU$302 (currently US$215.16/EUR183.98/GBP167.55 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this large(ish) etching showing no sign of hesitation in its execution or pictorial ambiguity in what is portrayed, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.