Gallery of prints for sale

Tuesday, 21 May 2019

Gerard Gauw's engraving of calligraphy, "Plate17" (1605), after Jan van de Velde I



Gerard Gauw (aka Gerrit Adriaensz. Gauw) (c1580–1638) after
Jan van de Velde I (1569–1623)

“Plate 17”, 1605, from the model book of 52 engraved plates of calligraphy (including the title and finis plates), “Deliciae variarum insigniumque scripturarum” (Delights of Various and Distinguished Scripts) published in 1649 by Willem Jansz. Blaeu (1571–1638) in Haarlem.

This publication and a description of its details may be view online or downloaded free-of-charge from Archive.org:

Details of this publication are also available from Hathi Trust:

Christie’s Auctions give many insights about this publication and advise that this is the “earliest and perhaps the rarest of Van den Velde's half-dozen writing books”; see:

Engraving on fine laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 14.9 x 18.5 cm; (plate) 10.5 x 15.7 cm.
Inscribed on plate with seven lines of cursive Italian text with flourishes and signed below the text: “Velde”
Numbered on plate at lower left corner: “17”.

Condition: a superb, richly inked and near faultless impression in museum quality/almost pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use). The very fine sheet is laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this small, rare and important masterpiece from the Dutch Golden Age, designed as a model for calligraphy students to copy, for AU$390 (currently US$268.17/EUR240.50/GBP211.19 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this supreme example of early calligraphy with serpentine flourishes on cursive Italian script, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Monday, 20 May 2019

Enea Vico's engraving, “Statue of Hermaphroditus in a Niche”, 1552


Enea Vico (1523–1567) according to the British Museum and the Museum Boijmans or an anonymous artist as proposed by the Rijksmuseum.

“Statue of Hermaphroditus in a Niche” (descriptive title only) (aka “Hermaphroditos”), 1552, after Marcantonio Raimondi’s (1470/1482–1527/1534) engraving, “Apollo” and its repetition in reverse (TIB 26[14].332[250] & 333[251]), after a sculpture that was once in the collection of the Palazzo Farnese (as inscribed on plate), from the series, “'Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae” (Mirror of Roman Splendour), published by Antoine Lafréry (aka Antonio Lafreri) (1512–1577) in Rome.

The Rijksmuseum offers the following insights into the series “Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae”, in which this print features:
(transl.) “This corpus, consisting of prints with representations of works of art and buildings from ancient and modern Rome, originated from publishers Antonio Salamanca and Antonio Lafreri. These two foreign publishers joined forces in Rome in the period 1553-1563. Their prints quickly became extremely popular with tourists and collectors, who purchased the prints individually or in large groups. Large groups of Speculum prints were often bound together in albums upon request. There are several Speculum albums that are all different in content. Between 1573 and 1577 Antonio Lafreri published a special title page (with the title 'Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae') that people could add to their collections. The death of Lafreri in 1577 did not mean the end of the corpus. A large part of the copper plates passed to Claudio and Stefano Duchetti. The rest was spread over various other publishers. The popularity of the Speculum prints managed to inspire publishers for a long time to have copies made and to add new prints to the corpus.” (RP-P-H-H-925)

Engraving on fine laid paper trimmed unevenly along the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 33.5 x 21.4 cm.
Inscribed on plate on pedestal base cartouche: “HERMAPHRODITI STATVA .../ … PALLATIO FARNESIANO COLLOCATA / ANT LAFRERII FORMISS ROMAE MDLII.”

Huelsen 56–A (Christian Huelsen 1921, “Das Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae des Antonio Lafreri”); Rubach 320 (Birte Rubach 2016, “Ant. Lafreri Formis Romae: Der Verleger Antonio Lafreri und seine Druckgraphikproduktion”, Berlin, Lukas Verlag, p. 415).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Statue of a youth identified as Hermaphroditos by the inscription, standing in contrapposto within a niche, right hand raised above head, left hand resting on a support. 1552 Engraving”

See also the description of this print offered by Museum Boijmans:

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum that attributes this print to an anonymous artist:
“Image of a male nude with an arm above the head. In the inscription, this figure is interpreted as Hermaphroditus, but the figure is also very similar to the Apollo Lyceus type.”

Condition: well-printed crisp impression in a generally clean condition, trimmed along the image borderline with replenished losses and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this Renaissance period engraving dated on the plate, “MDLII” (1552)—most likely a lifetime impression based on the crisp quality of the lines showing no sign of wear to the printing plate—for AU$412 (currently US$284.73/EUR255.14/GBP223.65 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this rare and (to my eyes) a curiously exciting print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Sunday, 19 May 2019

Orazio Borgianni's etching, “The Baptism of Christ”, 1615


Orazio Borgianni (aka Orazio Borgiani) (c1578–1616)

“The Baptism of Christ” (TIB title) (“Jésus Christ baptise dans le jourdain par St. Jean” [Bartsch title]), 1615 (inscribed on plate), plate 51 from the series of 52 etchings after Raphael, “The Loggia Paintings” (TIB title). Note that a previous collector has annotated in ink (now faded) at the lower right corner, “50”, but this number is inaccurate with regard to the plate sequence of the series.

Etching on fine laid paper, trimmed with loss of the left and right pointed ends of the hexagonal image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 14.6 x 20.1 cm
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower right corner) “1615 / [artist’s monogram]”
Lifetime impression of the only state. (Note: attribution of this print to a lifetime impression is based on the crisp quality of the lines showing minimal wear to the plate.)

TIB 38 (17).51(320) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1979, “The Illustrated Bartsch”, vol. 38, New York, Abaris Books, p. 410); Bartsch XVII.320.51.

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(transl.) “Christ is baptized by John the Baptist in the Jordan River. Angels kneel and float behind John.”

See also the description of this print offered by the British Museum:

Condition: richly inked, crisp and well-printed impression—a superior impression to the copies held by the British Museum (see BM no. 1893,1018.19.46) and the Rijksmuseum (see RP-P-OB-35.460)—trimmed with loss of the pointed ends of the image borderline. Beyond this loss and an inaccurate plate number inscribed in ink (now faded) by the old hand of a previous collector, the sheet is in excellent condition for its age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing). The sheet is backed with a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this superb etching executed in the last year of the artist’s life and based on the design of the legendary Raphael (1483–1520) who had passed away only 95 years before this print was created, for AU$257 (currently US$176.66/EUR158.27/GBP138.88 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this rare Renaissance period print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Saturday, 18 May 2019

Jean Baptiste Huet’s etching, “Jeune Bergère et ses Enfants”, 1795


Jean Baptiste Huet (1745–1811)

“Jeune Bergère et ses Enfants” (Young Shepherdess and her children), 1795, after a drawing by the artist from the series of 38 plates “Cahiers d'études” (aka “Oeuvres de J. B. Huet”), proof before lettering for publication (viz. “A Paris chez Huet Fils Rue ci dev. des Fossés Mr le Prince N.88.”) in Paris by the artist’s son, Jean Baptiste Huet the younger (1772–1852).

Note: my attribution of the date of execution of this etching as 1795 is based on the inscription on the plate below the artist’s signature: “l'an 5” (year 5). The British Museum attributes the date of this print to between 1796 and 1797, but I suspect that this attribution may be the date of the print’s publication rather than the date of its execution.

Etching on laid paper trimmed unevenly with a small margin around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet trimmed unevenly) 21 x 33 cm; (image borderline) 18.4 x 30.1 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline at upper right: ”J. B. Huet / l'an 5”.
Proof state (lifetime impression) before lettering with publication details.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print (after lettering for publication):
“Plate 7, bottom: seated peasant woman looking at the child sitting at her feet and stroking a sheep; in the background, on the left two children playing with a goat; cut out from a larger plate. 1796/97 Etching”

Note that I have previously posted a pair of etchings by this artist that are (surprisingly) still available:

Condition: richly inked and near faultless impression, trimmed with uneven margins around the image borderline and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. There is a pale dot stain towards the lower left corner otherwise the sheet is in an excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this luminous etching from the late 1700s—note how the artist has spotlit the resting shepherdess and silhouetted her children playing with a goat in the darkness—for AU$260 (currently US$178.72/EUR160.11/GBP140.50 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this strong proof-state etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold (along with the two earlier prints by Huet mentioned in the discussion)











Friday, 17 May 2019

Johannes Visscher's etching, “Meridies”, c1660, after Nicolaes Berchem


Johannes Visscher (aka Jan de Visscher) (1633–c1692)

“Meridies” (aka “Midday”; “Noon”), c1660, from the series of four plates, “Times of the Day”, after Nicolaes Berchem (Nicolaes Pietersz Berchem; Niclas Berghem; Claes Berighem; Nicolaes Pietersz. Berrighem) (1621/22–1683), published by Justus Danckertsz (Justus Danckerts; Justus Dankerts; Justus Danckers; Justus Danckertsz.) (1635–1701) in Amsterdam.

Note: There is a related grisaille in reverse to the print attributed to Berchem in the Musée de l’Hermitage, St Petersburg (inv. 2037”) (see Schuckman & Scheffer [Hollstein] p. 8 and BM. Nn,7.11.2).

Etching and engraving on laid paper trimmed close to the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 31.8 x 36.9 cm; (image borderline) 29.8 x 36.6 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) "C Berghem invent. / J. Vißcher fecit."; (centre) "MERIDIES."; (right) "Justus Danckerts Excudit".
State i (of i) Lifetime impression based on the strength and crisp quality of line showing no sign of wear to the printing plate.

Hollstein 2 (Christiaan Schuckman [comp.] D. De JHoop Scheffer [ed.] 1992, “Hollstein’s Ductch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woocuts, vol. 41, Roosendaal, Koninklijke van Poll, p. 8, cat. no. 2).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Midday; landscape with a group of shepherds and their flock; one of the shepherds reclines and drinks from a lidded tankard; a peasant woman breast feeds her baby and a boy wearing a hat sleeps nearby; in the distance a field is being ploughed; after Nicolaes Berchem”

See also the descrition offered by the Rijksmuseum:
(transl.) “View of a hilly landscape with shepherds and their cattle, at noon. The shepherds enjoy their lunch break, some food and drink, and another shepherd gets a nap. In the foreground a shepherdess feeds her baby.

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression trimmed close to the platemark and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. There is a collector’s mark at the lower right corner and there are several restored tears otherwise the sheet is in a good condition (i.e. beyond the restored tears, there are no holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this large etching sparkling with strong contrast from the richly inked lines for AU$310 (currently US$213.31/EUR190.83/GBP166.90 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this beautiful etching designed to capture the spirit of lethargy under the midday sun, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold