Gallery of prints for sale

Tuesday, 31 March 2020

Ferdinand Gaillard’s etching, “Les Pélerins d'Emmaus”, 1884, after Rembrandt


Ferdinand Gaillard (aka Claude Ferdinand Gaillard) (1834–1887)

“Les Pélerins d'Emmaus” (The Supper at Emmaus) (aka “Les Pelerins d'Emmaus” [The Pilgrims of Emmaus]), 1884, after the 1648 painting by Rembrandt (aka Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn) (1606–1669) in the Musée du Louvre, Paris, inv.no.1739 (Bredius 578) (see: http://rembrandt.louvre.fr/en/html/r13.html), printed by A Beillet (fl.1850–76) and published by the Société Française de Gravure—publishers founded in 1868 by Henriquel-Dupont at the Gazette des Beaux-Arts to publish plates for distribution to its membersin Paris.

Note: a watercoloiur by Ferdinand Gaillard of the same composition was auctioned by ARTCURIAL (Sale 2781, June 3, 2015): https://www.artcurial.com/en/lot-claude-ferdinand-gaillard-paris-1834-1887-les-pelerins-demmaus-dapres-rembrandt-harmenszoon-van.

Etching and engraving on chine collè (China) on heavy wove paper with wide margins as published.
Size: (sheet) 71 x 54.5 cm; (plate) 49 x 43.1 cm; (chine collé) 47.5 x 42.3 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “Rembrandt f 164[8]”.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “REMBRANDT PINXT.”; (centre) “SOCIÉTÉ FRANÇAISE DE GRAVURE./ Imp. A. Beillet, Paris.”; (right) “F. GAILLARD SCULPT.”
State x (of x) with the addition of publication details.

Beraldi 43 (Henri Beraldi 1885-92, “Les graveurs du 19e siècle; guide de l'amateur d'estampes modernes”, vol. 6, Paris, L. Conquet, p. 208, cat. no. 43); IFF 73 (“Inventaire du Fonds Français: Bibliothèque Nationale, Département des Estampes”, Paris, 1930).

Henri Beraldi (1885-92) in his catalogue raisonné offers the following insights about this print:
(transl.) “The engraver was probably tired of being told that he could only engrave calm and smooth paintings, so he wanted to show here a new face of his talent, by approaching Rembrandt and tackling color, that Gaillard … considered as a secondary thing or, according to its own expression, like a simple jam which one spreads on the drawing …” (vol. 6,  p. 208, cat. no. 43). 

Beradi proceeds to commend the print in that it (in translation) “reproduces with incredible fidelity the … slightest brushstroke of the original” and raises the interesting question: “But does it render … that ambient light which reigns the painting (when one sees it on a favourable day)?” (ibid.)

Note: the catalogue may be viewed online or downloaded free-of-charge from archive.org:

The British Museum offers the following description of this print”
“The supper at Emmaus, with Christ sitting in the middle, in front of architectural niche; after Rembrandt”

Condition: richly inked impression in museum-quality condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing). This is a superb copy of a huge print.

I am selling this large etching (with engraving) by arguably the finest engraver of the late 19th century who is famous for his remarkably his fine strokes—sometimes almost invisible!—rendering the most subtle of tonal transitions, for the total cost of AU$282 (currently US$172.23/EUR157.04/GBP139.22 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this masterpiece of 19th century reproductive printmaking executed with the documented purpose of showcasing the artist’s skill to translate the textures of Rembrandt’s painting into line, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Monday, 30 March 2020

Simon Gribelin II’s etching, “Shield Of Achilles”, c1715, after Nicolas Vleughels


Simon Gribelin II (1661–1733)

“Shield Of Achilles” (aka “Le Bouclier d'Achille”), c.1715–20, after Nicolas Vleughels (aka Nicolas Wleughels) (1668–1737), proof impression before the addition of publication details and elaboration of the line-fillers in the lower text. This print was later published in 1720 as an Illustration to the first edition of Alexander Pope’s (1688–1744) translation of Book 18 of Homer’s “Iliad” (fl.c.9th–8thC BC).

See the later publication state of this print offered by alamy images:

Charles-Nicolas Cochin (aka Charles Nicolas Cochin père) (1688–1754) also made an etching of the same design after Nicolas Vleughels, who I understand was commissioned by Jean Boivin (1663-1726)— professor of Greek at the Royal College and member of the Academy— to illustrate Achilles' shield as described by Homer, published by François Jouenne in 1715 in Paris.

Regarding Vleughels’ representation of this shield, the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) advises:
(transl.) “This reconstruction remains fairly faithful to the text, with the universe at its center, surrounded by twelve scenes from human life: three on the city in peace, three on the city in war, three on agriculture, three on pastoral life”

Etching and engraving on laid paper trimmed around the platemark with added sides and backed on a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 16.8 x 15.7 cm; (plate) 16.3 x 14.2 cm; (outer image borderline diameter) 14.5 cm.
Lettered on plate: (above the shield) “The Shield […] of Achilles/ as […] describ’d in/ Homers […] 18th Ilias.”; (below the shield) ïn Twelve […] Tables./ Three of a Town in Peace. 1. a Marriage. 2. An Assembly of the People. 3. A Senate./ Three of a Town in War. …/ …/ Three of Agriculture. …/ Three of a Pastoral Life. 10. Lions & Herds of Cattle. 11. Sheep. 12. The Dance.”

Condition: good (but not marvellous) proof-state impression trimmed along the platmark on the lower edge with the addition of 8 mm of paper extensions to the sides and laid onto a support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. The side panel extensions are mottled with stains (glue?) and this mottling is also to be seen slightly within the platemark otherwise the sheet is in good condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or signs of foxing).

I am selling this remarkable proof-state etching of great complexity in its design (following Homer’s description of the shield purported to be forged by the god Hephaestus) showing the constellations at the centre surrounded by the twelve Zodiac signs and an outer ring depicting twelve scenes from everday life, for the total cost of AU$290 (currently US$178.20/EUR160.97/GBP143.75 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this proof-state lifetime impression executed during the  bubonic plague pandemic known as “The Great Plague of Marseille”, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Sunday, 29 March 2020

Edwin Landseer’s two etchings, “Asses and Horses”, 1821–24


Edwin Landseer (aka Sir Edwin Henry Landseer) (1802–1873)

Two etchings on a single plate, “Asses and Horses” (V&A title) (aka “Donkeys and Horses” [Algernon Graves 1874, “Catalogue of the Works of the late Sir Edward Landseer, RA”, cat. no. 74]), signed and dated below each etching and published by Ernest Gambart & Co. (1814–1902) in London in 1848.

(upper plate)
“The Common in Winter” (aka “The Donkeys on a Common”), 1824
(see Frederic George Stephens 1889, “Sir Edwin Landseer”, London, S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, p. x and p. 25: https://archive.org/details/gri_33125002524060/page/n53/mode/2up).

(lower plate)
“Old Horses” (V&A title), 1821
(see the description of both plates offered by the Victoria and Albert Museum:

Etchings on fine India paper trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderlines with plate number and publication details.
Size: (sheet) 21.9 x 14.9 cm; (upper image borderline) 9.1 x 14.5 cm; (lower image borderline) 8.8 x 14.5 cm.
Numbered on plate: (upper right corner) “No. 12”.
Lettered on plate below the upper image borderline: (right) “E L [artist’s monogram] 1824”.
Lettered on plate below the lower image borderline: (left) “London, Pub. 22nd. March 1848 by E. Gambart & Co.”; (right) “E L [artist’s monogram] 1821/ The Donkeys […].”  

Condition: excellent impressions trimmed close to the image borderlines in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use).

I am selling this exceptionally rare pair of small original etchings—note that even the British Museum does not hold a copy of these etchings—by one of the best known of the 19th century English artists for AU$280 in total (currently US$172.70/EUR154.91/GBP138.70 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing these sensitively rendered studies where even the strokes describing the animals forms also hint at the tactile experience of their rough hair, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Saturday, 28 March 2020

Jan de Bisschop’s etching, “Angel with a Banderole”, c.1671


Jan de Bisschop (aka Johannes Episcopius) (1628–1671)

“Angel with a Banderole”, c.1671, after Giuseppe Cesari d'Arpino (aka Cavaliere d'Arpino; Josepin [as inscribed on plate]) (c.1568–1640), plate 30 (unfinished) in the series of 157 etchings by Jan de Bisschop, initially published at the Hague in 1671/72 by Nicolaas Visscher II (1649–1702) and later by Hendrik de Leth (1703–1766) in “Paradigmata Graphices Variorum Artificum”, with an etched title-page by Gerard de Lairesse (1640–1711) (see https://research.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3296238&partId=1). This impression is from the numbered and lettered Hendrik de Leth edition (c.1731–41).

See this publication and the context of this print online at archive.org:

Etching on laid paper with full margins as published.
Size: (sheet) 22 x 27.6 cm; (plate) 13.1 x 19.9 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (lower left) “Josepin inv.”; (lower right) “JE. f. 30”.
State iii (of iii) with the addition of the artist’s Latin monogram (JE. f.), the name of the designer (Josepin) and the plate number (30).

Hollstein Dutch 6 (F W H Hollstein 1950, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts ca. 1450–1700: Berckheyde–Bodding”, vol. 2, Amsterdam, Menno Hertzberger, p. 44, cat. no. 6); Gelder & Jost 30-3 (3) (Jan G van Gelder & Ingrid Jost 1985, “Jan de Bisschop and his Icones and Paradigmata: Classical Antiquities and Italian Drawings for Artistic Instrumentation in Seveneenth Century Holland”, Doornspijk, Davaco, p. 252, cat. no. 30).

The Curator of the British Museum offers the following insights about the design of this unfinished print:
“Detail from the fresco in the 'Moses-pendentive' by Giuseppe Cesari in the Capella Olgiati in the S. Prassede in Rome. This plate is the only unfinished one in the 'Paradigmata' and was probably meant to resemble those that come before and after it. The image was rotated 90º to right to fit page”

See also the description of this print at the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: excellent impression in near faultless condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains, foxing or significant signs of use).

I am selling this intriguingly unfinished etching of Giuseppe Cesari’s fresco for AU$247 in total (currently US$152.35/EUR136.66/GBP122.35 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this Baroque vision of an angel with a billowing banderole, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold