Gallery of prints for sale

Thursday, 31 December 2020

Claude Lorrain’s etching, “Harbour with Large Tower”, 1641


Claude Lorrain (aka Claude Gellée; Claude Le Lorrain; Claudio di Lorena) (1600–1682)

“Harbour with Large Tower” (aka “Le port de mer a la grosse tour”), c1641, related to a preparatory drawing in the Uffizi Gallery (Florence) and a lost painting. This impression was published in the 1816 McCreedy folio of “200 etchings” showcasing late impressions of old master prints taken from the original plates.

Etching on fine wove paper with a narrow margin around the platemark.

Size: (sheet) 13.5 x 20 cm; (plate) 13 x 19.4 cm; (image borderline) 12.6 x 19.1 cm.

State vi (of vi)

Mannocci 16; Blum 16; Robert-Dumesnil 13; Knab 139; Duplessis 13; Russell 29

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Harbour with a large tower; five sailors in the foreground. c.1641 Etching”

(https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1849-1003-144).

Condition: a strong and near faultless impression with narrow margins in near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of handling.

I am selling this marvellously strong and luminous original etching by Lorrain, for a total cost of AU$383 (currently US$296.04/EUR241.25/GBP216.67 at the time of posting this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this superb etching by Lorrain showing his hallmark use of “contre-jour”—the arrangment of portrayed features so that they are in front of and partly obscure the sun—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Luigi Ademollo’s etching with aquatint, “Departure of Hector for Battle & Venus Wounded by Diomede”, c1820

Luigi Ademollo (1764–1849)

“Departure of Hector for Battle & Venus Wounded by Diomede”, early 1800s, plate 5, two illustrations to Virgil’s epic poem, “The Aeneid” (29–19 BC).

Etching and aquatint printed in sepia coloured ink on wove paper, trimmed with a small margin around the two image borderlines and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 44.5 x 32 cm; (upper image borderline) 34 x 31.5 cm; (lower image borderline) 9 x 31.2 cm.

Numbered and lettered on plate below the upper image: (left) “5”; (centre) “PARTENZA DI ETTORE PEL COMBATTIMENTO.” (Departure of Hector for battle)

Lettered on plate below the lower image: (centre) “VENERE FERITA DA DIOMEDE.”; (right) “Luigi Ademolli Pittore fece.”

The Bartolini Collection and the Bibliotheca Hertziana offer descriptions of this print:

https://www.fraternitadeilaici.it/archivio-storico/archivio-museo/opere/collezione-bartolini/stampe/partenza-di-ettore-per-il-combattimento-e-unaltra-scenadalleneide-tav-5-3616.html;

https://foto.biblhertz.it/exist/foto/object.xql?id=08006607.

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression(s), but with restoration to fractures at the upper-left corner and laid onto a sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this very rare and large etching featuring two scenes from the Trojan War executed by a leading Tuscan Neoclassical artist of the early 1800s—interestingly, the treatment of the shadows with mottled light and the hint of surface textures may be viewed as heralding the late 19th century group of Tuscan Neoclassical artists called the Macchiaioli, because of their use of similar patches of light (termed "macchie")—for AU$302 (currently US$232.61/EUR189.01/GBP170.58 at the time of posting this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this beautifully glowing Neoclassical etching that is rarely seen on the art market, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 












Wednesday, 30 December 2020

Cornelis Bloemaert & Theodor Matham’s etching, “Tantale”, 1655, and Bernard Picart’s etching, “Tantalus’ Torment”, 1730


Cornelis Bloemaert (1603–1692) in collaboration with

Theodor Matham (aka Dirk Matham) (1605/06–1676) (background landscape)

Note: Based on the description offered by Archive.org, I understand that Cornelis Bloemaert also engraved the same design in reverse in another plate (c1676); see https://archive.org/details/tableauxdutemple00maro/page/n557/mode/2up.

“Tantale” (as titled on plate), c1655, after the design by Abraham van Diepenbeeck (aka Abraham van Diepenbeek; Abraham van Diepenbeke) (1596–1675), plate 54 in the series of 58 illustrations to Michel de Marolles’ (1600–1681) “Tableaux du Temple des Muses” (aka “Tableaux du temple des muses tirez du cabinet de feu Mr Favereau, et gravez en tailles-douces par les meilleurs maistres de son temps pour représenter les vertus et les vices, sur les plus illustres fables de l'antiquité, avec les descriptions, remarques et annotations”), published by Nicolas Langlois in Paris in 1655. This impression may be from a later date as it is inscribed on the plate with the number, “57”.

Etching and engraving on laid paper.

Size: (sheet) 32.5 x 22.7 cm; (plate) 27.4 x 18 cm; (image borderline) 23.3 x 17.6 cm.

Numbered and lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Tantale”; (centre) [two lines of Greek from Homer's Odyssey] HOMER. Odyss. XI.”; (right) “54”.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Mythological scene with Tantalus in a river trying to reach for some fruits on a tree at left, Hell in left background; after Abraham van Diepenbeeck; illustration on page 427 from Marolles' "Temple des Muses" (Paris, Nicolas Langlois: 1655). c.1635-1638”

(https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1973-0616-52).

Note: the BM references this print in Marcel Roethlisberger’s “Abraham Bloemaert and His Sons” (1993) with cat. no. “CB11”, but this reference is incorrect as CB11 is the cat. no. for “The Slaying of the Niobids” (see vol. 1, p. 524).

Condition: strong impression but with a printer’s crease on the right. The sheet is in an excellent condition with no tears, holes, losses, abrasions, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this pair of etchings based on the same design, but executed by different artists with a gap of around 75 years separating them, for AU$334 in total for the pair (currently US$255.55/EUR208.40/GBP188.81 at the time of posting this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this amazing pair of superb quality etchings, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This pair of prints has been sold







Bernard Picart (1673–1733)

“Tantalus’ Torment” (aka “Tantalus in Hades”), 1730, after the engraving by Cornelis Bloemaert and Theodor Matham after the design by Abraham van Diepenbeeck, first published in Amsterdam by Zacharias Chatelain (fl.1705–1749) in 1733 in “Le temple des muses: orné de LX tableaux où sont représentés les evenemens les plus remarquables de l'antiquité fabuleuse” (The temple of the muses: decorated with 60 illustrations representing the most remarkable events of fabulous antiquity), plate inset between pages 142 and 143 (see https://archive.org/details/gri_33125012263162/page/n265/mode/2up).

Etching and engraving in two plates (an outer frame plate and an inner image plate) on laid paper.

Size: (sheet) 46.4 x 28.6 cm; (outer plate) 35.5 x 25.7 cm; (image borderline) 34.2 x 24.4 cm.

Lettered on plate below the image: “B. Picart dir. / TANTALE CONDAMNÉ À SOUFFRIR LA FAIM & LA SOIF, Des Tantalus Bunderbahre bestrafung / MALGRÉ LES FRUITS & LES EAUX QUI L’ENVIRONNENT. │Tantalus midden onder Vrugten en Wateren, / Tantalus’s torment. │tot honger en dorst verweesen.”

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Tantalus in Hades, standing in shoulder-deep water, tries to pick up some fruits from a tree; in ornate frame, with winds on each side, and peacock in the lower part, printed from a separate plate; plate LVI to 'Le Temple des Muses' (first published Amsterdam: Chatelain, 1733). c.1730/33”

(https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1914-0214-214).

Condition: strong, near faultless impression in near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, significant stains, foxing or signs of handling.







Tuesday, 29 December 2020

Harmen Jansz. Muller’s engraving, “Tamar Shows the Staff and Ring of Judah”, c1566, after Maarten van Heenskerck

Harmen Jansz. Muller (1540–1617)

“Tamar Shows the Staff and Ring of Judah” (aka “Tamar toont de staf en ring van Juda”; “Tamar Brought to Execution, Showing Judah's Pledge”), c1566 (1564–1568), after a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck (aka Maarten van Veen; Martin Heemskerk) (1498–1574), plate 3 from the series of 4 engravings, “History of Judah and Tamar”, possibly published by Claes Jansz. Visscher II (1586–1652) in Amsterdam.

Wikipedia offers details of the publication of this print in its first state:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tamar_toont_de_staf_en_ring_van_Juda_Geschiedenis_van_Juda_en_Tamar_(serietitel)_Thesaurus_sacrarum_historiarum_veteris_testamenti,_elegantissimis_imaginibus_expressum_excellentissimorum_in_hac_arte,_RP-P-1995-25-56.jpg

Engraving on fine laid paper backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 27.8 x 29.2 cm; (plate) 21.3 x 25.4 cm; (image borderline) 19.8 x 25 cm.

Numbered and inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “3”; (lower right of centre) “MHeemskerck In. [MH interlaced]”

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: “VINCTA VENIT FLAMMIS IAM IAM TRADENDA PARATIS HVIVS AIT NATOS PARIAM QVI HIS VTITVR ARMIS / Genesis 38.24.”

State ii (of ii)

New Hollstein Dutch 7-2(2) (Harmen Jansz. Muller); New Hollstein Dutch 41-2(2) (Maarten van Heemskerck).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:

“Judah kindles a fire to burn his daughter-in-law Tamar. He wants to punish her for acting like a whore and getting pregnant because of it. However, Tamar shows him his staff and signet ring, proving that he made her pregnant. After that, Judah admits that he is guilty and Tamar is not. At the bottom in the margin a verse in Latin”

(http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.501922).

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression with a hand-written inscription by an old hand in faded brown ink in the lower margin and laid onto a sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. Beyond a closed tear in the lower margin and a few minor stains, the sheet is in a very good condition for its considerable age.

I am selling this arresting image of a fire being prepared by Judah (shown on the left) to incinerate his daughter-in-law, Tamar (shown on the right holding a staff in one hand and ring in the other), for being unfaithful to her husband—of course, Judah is mistaken and is about to discover that he had (shockingly) slept with his daughter-in-law after mistaking her for a prostitute—for AU$288 (currently US$218.88/EUR178.61/GBP162.09 at the time of posting this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this Renaissance period engraving of superb quality, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold