Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 23 August 2019

Charles Allan Gilbert's charcoal drawing, “Profile Portrait of a Woman Facing Left”, 1903


Charles Allan Gilbert (1873–1929)

Gilbert was an American Illustrator famous for his often reproduced memento mori drawing, “All Is Vanity” (1892) (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Allan_Gilbert#/media/File:Allisvanity.jpg) that was later  referenced in Def Leppard's album cover, "Retro Active" (1993) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retro_Active). Interestingly, the portrayed lady on the left has a striking resemblance to the charcoal portrait shown here.

“Profile Portrait of a Woman Facing Left”, 1903, charcoal on wove paper, signed (“C. Allan Gilbert”) dated (“1903”) and backed with a support sheet.
Size: 47 x 34.5 cm.
Hand-signed by the artist and dated at lower right: “C. Allan Gilbert/ 1903”)

See another drawing by Gilbert similar to this portrait (but in ink rather than charcoal) with biographical details about this artist at Zaidan Gallery: http://www.zaidan.ca/_borders/Art_Gallery/Gilbert/Allen-Gilbert.htm

Condition: The sheet is in near pristine condition considering the age of the drawing (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, foxing, significant stains or signs of handling). Nevertheless, there is a small border (5 mm) of light toning to the paper appropriate to the drawing having been mounted in the past. The sheet is laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this stunningly beautiful drawing of a young woman exemplifying the spirit of the La Belle Époque age for the total cost of AU$670 (currently US$452.83/EUR406.14/GBP368.55 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this sensitively executed study capturing in minimal strokes the mercurial “spark of life” that only the finest artist can express, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Jan Sadeler I's engraving, “The Descendants of Lamech”, 1583


Jan Sadeler I (aka Johannes Sadeler; Johann Sadeler) 1550–1600)

“The Descendants of Lamech”, 1583, after a lost drawing by Maarten de Vos (1532–1603), plate 9 from the series of twelve plates, “The Story of the First Men”, published in Antwerp by Jan Sadeler I.

Engraving on fine laid paper trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 20.1 x 26 cm; (image borderline) 19.1 x 25.8 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “Ioan: Sadl: inue: et scalps: […] 9”; (centre, on stone) "GENES: IIII"; (lower centre right) “M. de vos figuravit”.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline in two columns of two lines of Latin text: “Excæpit Lamech ex bina coniuge .../...// …/ …natamque Noemam."
State ii (of ii) with the addition of the number “9”.

TIB 7001.025 S2 (Isabelle de Ramaix (ed.) 1999, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Johan Sadeler I”, vol. 70, Part 1 (Supplement), New York, Abaris Books, p. 44); Nagler 1835–52, no. 19; Le Blanc, no. 39; Wurzbach, no. 8.9; Hollstein 1980, vol. 21, no. 25; Edquist, p. 7, no. 11a.

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
“Lamech and his two women, left in the foreground, sitting in front of their house. In the foreground on the right the children Tubal-Cain and Ada. In the foreground left the children Jabal and Naäma. Lamech swears he will never be killed. Two corpses are found in the background. The print has a Latin signature.”

See also the description of this print at the British Museum:
“Plate 9: Lamech and his two wifes [sic]. Landscape with Lamech at centre, talking to his two wives Adah and Zillah seated in front of a farm-house at left, one of whom shades herself with a parasol of leaves, two children playing music at far left, two other children in foreground, Lamech again beyond standing next to a dead man, a wide landscape with mountains in background.”

Condition: crisp and well-printed impression, trimmed around the image borderline and laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. The sheet is in near perfect condition apart from a restored spot in the clouds at upper right.

Note that this is the second copy of this print that I have listed (the earlier copy has been sold).

I am selling this superb impression of a very rare engraving, showing Lamechthe first polygamist cited in the Bible (see Genesis 4:18)—confessing to his wives that he has killed two men (Genesis 4: 23), for the total cost of AU$423 (currently US$285.98/EUR258.30/GBP234.26 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this remarkably detailed and important print featuring a sequence of biblical scenes within a single composition, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Thursday, 22 August 2019

Maria Sibylla Merian's engraving, “Plate VII: Prunier fleuri”, 1679


Maria Sibylla Merian (aka Maria Sibylla Graff) (1647–1717)

“Plate VII: Prunier fleuri” (Flowering Plum, caterpillar and butterfly), 1679–1683, published as plate 7 in Merian’s “De europische Insecten” (aka “Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung, und sonderbare Blumennahrung” [The Wondrous Transformation of Caterpillars and their Strange Diet of Flowers]) editions from 1679/83 until 1730. The page format of this impression suggests that his impression is from the earlier edition as in the final 1730 edition the prints are clustered four to a page and the title text is erased (see an online copy of the 1730 edition with the publication details at archive.org https://archive.org/details/gri_33125008530400/page/n12).

Engraving on laid paper, coloured by hand in watercolour (presumably at the time of publication) with full margins as published and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 23.4 x 16.8 cm; (plate) 14.8 x 11 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (upper right corner) “VII”; (lower centre) “Prunier fleuri.”
Lifetime impression (based on the format of the page which suggests that it is from one of the first editions).

Regarding the edition size, Florence F.J.M. Pieters & Diny Winthagen (1999) in “Maria Sibylla Merian, naturalist and artist (1647-1717): a commemoration on the occasion of the 350th anniversity of her birth” (“Archives of Natural History”, 26 [1]) advise:
“… her books were very rare, editions probably not exceeding 100 copies, and consequently very expensive for scientists — especially the coloured copies: the subscription prices of a coloured versus an uncoloured copy of her book on Surinam insects were 45 and 15 Dutch guilders” (p. 10). Note that “the pay of a Dutch ocean-going sailor came to 9 guilders a month during the entire seventeenth and eighteenth centuries” (ibid). [https://pure.uva.nl/ws/files/956970/80552_327018.pdf]).

Condition: crisp, near faultless and very well preserved impression (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing), laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this rare engraving by the first woman artist-naturalist to publish her findings that catapillars—described in Merian’s day one of the "beasts of the devil"—were not "’born of mud’ by spontaneous generation” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Sibylla_Merian), but that they were a stage in the metamorphoses of the butterfly, for the total cost of AU$257 (currently US$173.87/EUR156.92/GBP143.06 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this lifetime impression of one of the first coloured botanical studies ever published—mindful that the colours were chosen for their accuracy and that the artist recorded the plants from which pigments could be derived at a time when the guild system disallowed women from painting in oils (see Wikipedia about this artist)—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Hendrik Goltzius' engraving, “Giovanni de' Medici in a Duel”, c1575


(Attributed to) Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617)

“Giovanni de' Medici in a Duel” (aka “Duel on Horseback”; “Giovanni De’ Medici Beats his Opponent in a Cavalry Battle”), c1578/1583, plate 5 from the series of 22 plates, “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi” (transl. “The Medici Family’s Successes Victories and Triumphs”) (aka The History of the Medici), after Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Johannes Stradanus; Giovanni della Strada; Jan van der Straeten; Giovanni Statenensis; Giovanni Stradano) (1523–1605), published by Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612) in Haarlem.

Note: The Curator of the British Museum advises that the Rijksmuseum holds a related drawing (see BM no. Ii,5.169).

Engraving on fine laid paper with watermark trimmed close to the platemark with narrow margins around the image borderline.
Size: (sheet) 22 x 29.6 cm; (image borderline) 20.2 x 29.4 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “Joh. Stradanus inue. P.Galle excudit”.
Numbered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “5”.
Lettered in two lines of Latin on plate below the image borderline: “Joh. Med. hostem fortiss. ad singulare certamen prouocantem hasta per loricam pectore/ Transfixo exequo exanimem reliquit”
State ii (of ii)
This impression is from the first edition with Philips Galle as the publisher. There is an (alleged) second edition published by Theodor Galle and a third edition published by Johannes Galle.
(See explanation of the three editions offered by Lombardia Beni Culturali:

TIB 3(3).286(87)–1(2) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Hendrik Goltzius”, vol. 3, p. 253, cat. no. 286 [87]); Hollstein Dutch 330;

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Giovanni de' Medici in a Duel; Giovanni remains on his horse holding a broken lance while his opponent, at right, has fallen wounded from his horse; the duellists are in an arena with assembled spectators. 1583”.

See also the Rijksmuseum’s description of this print:
(Transl.) “Giovanni de' Medici has just knocked his opponent off his horse with his lance. The two are inside a fence, surrounded by a lot of horsemen. Two lines of Latin below the show. This print is part of a 22-part series of prints from the history of Giovanni de 'Medici, called' dalle Bande Nere '.”

Walter L Strauss (1982) in TIB, vol. 3 (Commentary) offers the following description of this print and insights provided by EKJ Reznicek (1980) in “Simiolus 10”:
“Giovanni de' Medici is shown with his lance broken; his opponent, breast pierced by the tip of Medici's lance, is falling off his horse. Reznicek notes a similarity in the face of the dislodged rider to Jan van Hemessen's painting of 1566, ‘Christ Driving the Money Changers from the Temple’ at Nancy (exhibition catalogue ‘Le seizième siècle européen’, Paris [Petit Palais] 1965–66, no. 166) and to Rubens's ‘Lion Hunt’ in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich” (Stauss, p. 311; Reznicek, p. 201).

Condition: early/lifetime impression (based on the crisp quality of the line showing no sign of wear to the plate and its publication in the first edition as confirmed by the name of the publisher) with no restorations, trimmed close to the image borderline in excellent condition for its age (i.e. there is light age toning but there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this graphically strong and very well preserved engraving for the total cost of AU$402 (currently US$272.54/EUR245.59/GBP224.50 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this lifetime impression of a masterwork from the 16th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Tuesday, 20 August 2019

Workshop of Hendrik Goltzius' engraving, “Apollo Killing Python”, 1589


Workshop of Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617) and executed under Goltzius’ direction. (Note that amongst the students in Golzius’ workshop were the highly distinguished artists: Jacob Matham, Jan Saenredam, Jan Muller, Jacob de Gheyn II and Pieter de Jode.)

“Apollo Killing Python”, 1589, from the series of fifty-two prints (of an originally planned 300), “Metamorphoses from Ovid”, published in Haarlem in 1589 by Hendrik Goltzius/Claes Jansz. Visscher (1587–1652) in “Metamorphoses Book I.”

Engraving on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 17.8 x 25.6 cm; (image borderline) 16.8 x 25.2 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline with four lines of Latin verses in two columns by Franco Estius (fl.1580s–1594): "Immensum certis strauit ... / ... necat atq mari." 
State i (of ii) before numbering.

TIB 3 (3). 43 (105) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Hendrik Goltzius”, vol. 3, p. 319, cat. no. 43 (105); New Hollstein Dutch 544–1(2).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate 13: Apollo killing the Python; the god standing at left and pointing a big bow at the monster; after Hendrik Goltzius.”

See also the description of this print offered by the Rijksmuseum:
(Transl.) “Apollo kills the snake Python with many arrows (depicted here as a dragon). In the bottom margin a four-line explanation, in two columns, in Latin.”

Condition: an exceptionally rare lifetime impression before numbering, richly inked and well-printed, trimmed with small margins around the image borderline. The sheet is laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper to flatten the centre-fold of publication. There are a few stains retouched with watercolour to make them virtually invisible—in the distant sea below the arrow and on the first loop of the Python’s tail—otherwise the sheet is in excellent condition with no tears, holes, abrasions, or foxing.

(Please note that this is the second impression of this print that I have listed—the previous impression has been sold.)

I am selling this stunning, lifetime impression of a print that is very seldom seen on the market for the total cost of AU$460 (currently US$311.80/EUR281.43/GBP257.92 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this fabulous engraving from the 16th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold