Monday, 22 August 2016

My painting: “View from the window of an apartment in Sydney”


Over the next few days I thought I would post a few pics of the paintings that I have been working on. This small aquarelle pencil and oil on canvas (27 x 23cm) shows a view of Sydney (towards Potts Point?) from the window of an apartment where we were staying.

For anyone interested in purchasing this painting on unstretched canvas, I am asking a mere AU$500 with free postage to anywhere in the world. To make the transaction easy, please email me at oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com and I will send you a PayPal invoice.




Sunday, 21 August 2016

Godefroy Engelmann’s lithograph after Abel de Pujol


Godefroy Engelmann I (1788–1839)
“Tête d'Ëtude d'après le Tableau de St. Etienne”, 1817 after Alexandre Denis Abel de Pujol (1785–1861)
Lithograph on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 49.4 x 34.9 cm
Lettered in the plate: (lower left) “E: Parizeau élêve de Mr, David.”; (lower centre) “Tête d'Ëtude d'après le Tableau de St. Etienne / peint, par Mr Abel de Pujol — Salon de 1817.”; (lower right) “Lith de G: Engelmann. / Chez Ostervald L’aine’ rue Pavée St. Andre ‘des Arts No.3”
Condition: crisp impression in marvellous condition (i.e. there are no holes, tears, folds or foxing). This is an exceptionally rare and very large lithograph.

I am selling this exceptionally rare and very large lithograph for AU$139 in total (currently US$105.85/EUR93.73/GBP80.95 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this neoclassical master print by the artist that patented chromolithography, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


At first I was perplexed by this beautiful neoclassical portrait, as the inscribed title seemed to suggest that this finely rendered face with its bare shoulder and cute kiss-curl was of Saint Etienne (aka Saint Stephen). My bewilderment was not so much about delicate facial features and mild eroticism in the depiction of Saint Etienne—who is famous as the first Christian martyr (presuming I have my facts right)—but rather that Saint Etienne should be a man. Of course, once I translated the French text and studied the content properly I quickly realised that this head is a study for a figure featured in Abel de Pujol’s painting: “Preafication de Saint Etienne” (1817) (see an image of the painting at: http://www.patrimoine-histoire.fr/images/Patrimoine/Paris/eStThomasdAquin/ParSTdA81c.JPG).

To give a context for the significance of Abel de Pujol’s painting, Stephen Bann (2013) in “Ways Around Modernism” offers the following wonderful summary:
“Abel de Pujol's star has waned (to put it mildly), but in 1817 it could scarcely have been brighter, since the painting [“Preafication de Saint Etienne”] had tied for first prize in the category of history painting in the first (and last) major competition of the Restoration, supervised by the Académie des Beaux Arts at the request of the king himself. In other terms Abel de Pujol's work had achieved in 1817 just the measure of official acknowledgement that Ingres was looking for (though not finding) before his success with Louis Ill/ at the Salon of 1824 and his election to the Académie des Beaux-Arts in the following year.”




Saturday, 20 August 2016

Andrew Miller’s 18th century mezzotint of Veronese’s “Venus with a Mirror”


Andrew Miller (c.1690/fl.1739–63)
“Venus with a Mirror”, 1740 after a painting by Paolo Veronese (1528–88) published by John Bowles (1701?–79).
Mezzotint engraving on fine laid paper with small margins
Size: (sheet) 37.5 x 27.8 cm; (plate) 36.4 x 25.2 cm; (image borderline) 31.2 x 24.9 cm
Lettered below the image borderline: (lower-left corner) “From a Capital Picture of Paulo Veronese.”; (lower-right corner) “And.w Miller Fecit.”; (lower centre) two columns of poetry in two lines, beginning: “Veil, Happy Fair One! ... / Printed for John Bowles at the Black Horse in Cornhill 1740.”
This rare print is not in the collection of The British Museum, nevertheless, the museum offers 73 other prints by Miller: http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx?people=114724&peoA=114724-2-60
Note that the British Museum in providing biographical details about Miller advise: “His work is very rare.”
For solid biographic details about Andrew Miller, see “A Dictionary of Irish Artists” (1913): http://www.libraryireland.com/irishartists/andrew-miller.php
Condition: excellent impression in marvellous condition (i.e. there are no holes, tears, folds or foxing).

I am selling this superb quality and very rare mezzotint for AU$144 in total (currently US$109.66/EUR97.10/GBP83.87 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this subtlety executed old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Only a top mezzotint artist could make this fine print, as the medium is so technically demanding. Miller was trained in the time-consuming craft of a mezzotint engraver by the famous and prolific specialist in this medium, John Faber, Jr. (1684–1756).

For those that may be unfamiliar with this somewhat rare medium of mezzotint, the process begins “by roughening the plate with thousands of little dots made by a metal tool with small teeth called a ‘rocker’” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mezzotint). If the plate were inked and printed at this beginning stage, the resulting print would be flat black image created out of thousands/millions of dots. To add light tones to the roughened plate, a metal burnisher is employed to literally scrape away the surface pitting until the various tones of the envisaged image are achieved. When the burnished plate is then printed, the resulting image has a soft, rich luminosity that would be difficult to achieve using any other printing technique.




Friday, 19 August 2016

Viktor Alexejewitsch Bobrof’s etched self-portrait


Viktor Alexejewitsch Bobrof (aka Viktor Alexeyevich Bobrov; Viktor Alekseyevich Bobroff; Viktor Alexeevich Bobrov) (1842–1918)
“Selfstportrait” (Self Portrait), c.1892, published by der Gesellschaft für Vervielfältigende Kunst, Vienna.
Etching and roulette with plate tone on cream wove paper
Size: (sheet) 39.2 x 29.2 cm; (plate) 31.8 x 29.6 cm
Lettered in the plate below the image (lower left) “Original-Radirung von V.Bobrof.”; (lower centre) “SELBSTPORTRAIT.”; (lower right) “Druck der Gesellschaft f. vervielf. Kunst, Wien.”
Condition: marvellous, richly-inked impression in pristine condition.

I am selling this marvellous self-portrait by Bobrof for AU$112 in total (currently US$85.32/EUR75.31/GBP65.03 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this beautifully executed etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Although information about this artist is thin—for instance, the British Museum does not hold any of the 100 etchings executed by him—fortunately, Sothbys offers some revealing insights (see http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2013/russian-paintings-l13115/lot.310.html). From the information that Sothbys provide, I now understand that this Russian painter and printmaker is famous for his repeated variations on a theme. Moreover, he is also famous for having been influenced by Rembrandt.

When I read about Rembrandt’s influence on Bobrof, I thought back to an Instagram follower who wrote to me requesting that I might like to offer a few thoughts/suggestions about his first attempt at etching—a copy of one of Rembrandt’s self-portraits. (I should say at this point that fortunately I am seldom asked for comments on artworks as I find the task unnecessarily demanding on my grey cells.) The print was fine but he had missed a few important attributes of the original image. The short version is that the student was using too many lines to render the portrayed hair and I proposed only showing individual hairs when they lay in the half-lights.

The reason for me thinking about this follower’s request for a critique is that this self-portrait by Bobrof is clearly not a composition devised by Rembrandt. Nevertheless, the chiaroscuro/theatrical lighting and the confident command of the etching needle exhibits (to a limited degree) some of Rembrandt’s hallmarks. There is a critical element, however, that separates the two masters: Bobrof does not employ a visual device, such as a projecting hand or piece of the surrounding architecture, to link the pictorial depth of the image with that of the physical space of the viewer. In short, Bobrof’s marvellously executed and highly creative composition is like a stone wall which can be looked at but not fully engaged with. By contrast, the “secret” of a good Rembrandt is that the image “reaches” out to viewers so that they feel welcomed into the pictorial space of the image.






Saturday, 13 August 2016

Allaert van Everdingen’s etching, “The Knoll”


Allaert van Everdingen (1621–75)
“La Butte” (The Knoll), 1636–75
Etching on fine laid paper trimmed to the image borderline.
Size: (sheet) 13.4 x 18.9 cm
State iii/iii (based on a pencil inscription verso)
Inscribed with the artist’s monogram at lower left edge: “AVE”.
Bartsch II.216.100; Hollstein 100.II

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “The hill; two peasants seated next to a large boulder at centre; a third peasant walking past them and the hut at right; at left a wild stream passing a tall tree; in left background a monastery on a hill.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1634435&partId=1&searchText=+Everdingen&page=6)

Condition: crisp and richly inked impression, trimmed to the borderline in good condition. Verso shows an ink setoff from when the original printer left this impression on top of another still wet impression (a fascinating piece of historical evidence about the printing practice at the time). There are remnants of mounting and inscriptions from previous collectors (verso).

I am selling this early etching capturing the spirit of the Nordic landscape for AU$125 in total (currently US$95.62/EUR85.66/GBP73.97 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this old master print with the rare ink setoff from another impression (verso), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


What is find fascinating about this artist’s landscapes is not simply that he portrays Nordic scenes with babbling brooks, lumpy rocks and lush trees. What really makes his landscapes special to me is that the babbling brooks, lumpy rocks and lush trees are invariably underpinned with a rigid framework of straight lines that make his landscapes compositionally strong. In this etching, for instance, note how the angles of the architectural features—the monastery in the far distance on the left and the two huts on the right—act like compositional “bones” that give structure to the image.

This print also has a “special” hidden attribute that can only be seen on the back of the print: an offset print (i.e. a mirror image in printer’s ink) from another impression of the same print left when the printer laid this impression on the other still wet impression. Ideally such an offset impression should never happen, as all printers know that freshly pulled prints should not be stacked on top of one another. Nevertheless, I love seeing such revealing acts of dreadful negligence by ancient printers. The German language has the perfect word for it: schottenfreude.




Friday, 12 August 2016

Flameng’s etching, “Deliverance of the Captives of Carcassonne”


Léopold Flameng (aka Léopold Joseph Flameng) (1831–1911)
“Délivrance des Emmurés de Carcassonne”(Deliverance of the Captives of Carcassonne), 1879, after a painting by Jean Paul Laurens (1838–1921) exhibited in the Salon of 1879, printed by Alfred Salmon (fl. 1863–94),” first published in “L'Art, 1879. This impression is from the sumptuous double volumes of MK Halévys “L’Eau-Forte”, 1888.
Etching on heavy cream wove paper (Japan/Arches)
Size: (sheet) 40.1 x 28.5 cm; (image borderline) 28.6 x 22.7 cm
Numbered above image: “Planche XXXIV”
Beraldi 1885-92 207; IFF 248

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Bernard Délicieux freeing prisoners from the Inquisition's jail in Carcassonne, after Laurens; the Franciscan friar stands on the left and addresses a crowd with both hands in the air while on the right a group of men is destroying the wall blocking the entrance of the jail; published in “L'Art, 1879” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3496274&partId=1&searchText=flameng+Laurens&page=1)

Condition: strong, well-inked and well-printed impression in good condition (i.e. there are no significant stains, tears, folds or signs of foxing, but there is a band of age-toning verso).

I am selling this original etching (with engraving) by Flameng for a total cost of AU$72 (currently US$55.29/EUR49.57/GBP42.65 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this fine print by one of the leading reproductive printmakers of the 19th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


MK Halévy, in the first volume of “L’Eau-Forte” (1888), offers a good account of what is illustrated in this etching by Léopold Flameng after Jean Paul Laurens’ painting of the same name (now in the Luxembourg museum):
“The people of Carcassonne have just attacked the wall of the inquisitorial dungeons to release the prisoners. In the centre, Jean de Picquigny, reformer of Languedoc, stands watching the invasion which he cannot prevent; the brother-miner, Bernard Délicieux, strives to pacify the mob” (p. xvi). (For those unfamiliar with this incident, the “storming” of the prison occurred in 1303 involving not only the local folk of Carcassonne, but also those of Albi.)

At the time of executing this print, Flameng was famous as a reproductive printmaker (i.e. an artist who translates paintings and other artworks into prints). His reputation was established by his very first etching: a copy of Rembrandt’s “Hundred Guilder Print” (see his graphic translation at https://www.artsy.net/artwork/leopold-flameng-after-rembrandt-van-rijn-the-hundred-guilder-print). This print was so good that Charles Blanc exclaimed: “He has imitated Rembrandt to a point that would deceive the master himself were he to return to this world” (FL Leipnik, 1924, p. 119).

Although this graphic translation is far from the incredibly sensitive rendering of Rembrandt’s masterpiece, I wish to draw attention to his treatment of the children portrayed in this print. Few artists have the skill to render the fine facial features of children when they are bathed in light. Note for example how Flemeng creates white lines to represent the children’s blonde hair, a feat that is not so straight forward when one is making an image only using black lines.





Thursday, 11 August 2016

Lépicié’s engraving “Le Bénédicité”, after Chardin


Bernard Lépicié (aka François Bernard Lépicié; Bernard L'Epicie; Bernard Lépicier) (1698–1755)
“Le Bénédicité” (The Grace), 1744, after a painting by Jean Baptiste Siméon Chardin (1699–1779), published by Louis Surugue (c.1686–1762)
Engraving (with etching), trimmed to the image borderline, on heavy laid paper.
Size: (sheet) 36.8 x 25.3 cm
Lettered with names of designer and etcher, date, title, four verses in French, inscription giving the provenance of the original painting, and publication addresses: “à Paris chez Lépicié (...) au coin de l'Abreuvoir du Quay des Orfevres” and “chez L. Surugue (...) ruë des Noyers vis à vis le mur de St. Yves”.

Bocher 1876 5.II (Bocher, Emmanuel, Jean-Baptiste Siméon Chardin: catalogue raisonné, Paris, 1876); IFF 70 (Inventaire du Fonds Français: Bibliothèque Nationale, Département des Estampes, Paris, 1930)

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Saying grace, after Chardin; domestic interior with woman serving soup to her two children sitting at a table, the youngest saying the grace.” The curator of the British Museum also advises that this print is after “a painting by Chardin shown at the Salon in 1740, formerly in the collection of Louis XV, and now in the Musée du Louvre (Paris). A pair to 'La mère laborieuse'.”

Condition: rare impression, trimmed to the image borderline, with small surface abrasions and light staining. Beyond these issues, the sheet is clean and in good condition (i.e. there are no tears, folds or holes).

I am selling this rare 1744 original engraving of domestic bliss by Lépicié after Chardin for a total cost of AU$205 (currently US$158.09/EUR141.68/GBP121.93 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this charming and delicately executed print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Beyond being famous for his translations of Chardin’s paintings into delicate etched and engraved lines—such as this superb example—Lépicié was also a poet. Like most poets struggling to find an audience, Lépicié clearly saw an opportunity to make the meaning of Chardin’s composition unambiguous with a few lines of poetry inscribed below the image:
“La Soeru, en tapinois, se rit du petit frere / Qui bégaie son oraison, / Lui, sans s’ínquiéter, dépêche sa priere, / Son apétit fait sa raison. Lépicié” (Google Translation: "Sister, stealthily, laughs at the little brother / Who stutters his prayer, / He, without worry, dispatches his prayer, / His frighten its raison. Lépicié ")

Although this print is the same as the copy in the British Museum with the attribution to Bernard Lépicié, the Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery has another copy with the name, “Rene Elizabeth Marie Lepicie” inscribed on the plate (lower right). Interestingly, the Hunterian Museum proposes: “Lépicié's interpretation of Saying Grace was one of the most popular prints of the century." (http://www.huntsearch.gla.ac.uk/cgi-bin/foxweb/huntsearch/DetailedResults.fwx?collection=all&searchTerm=933&mdaCode=GLAHA).

Regarding the popularity of this famous print, Archibald Younger (1913) in “French Engravers of the 18th Century” makes the bold assessment: “… difficult as it must have been to reproduce in black and white the life with which his [Chardin’s] pictures were imbued … in Lépicié’s beautiful plate of ‘Le Benedicite’ … the engraver’s art may be said to have now almost reached its zenith “(p. xiii).





Monday, 8 August 2016

Corot’s cliché verre print, “Souvenir of Ostia”


Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (1796–1875)
“Souvenir of Ostia”, 1855, from the series of cliché verre prints, “Quarante Cliché-Glaces”, printed in the Le Garrec 1921 edition with Le Garrec’s ink stamp verso.
Point drawn cliché verre on fine light sensitive wove paper, signed by the artist in reverse (lower left)
Size: (sheet) 28.9 x 36.1 cm; (image borderline) 27.2 x 34.4 cm
Delteil 57; Melot 57

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate 13: landscape (Ostia?) with church(?) building amongst trees, figure in foreground beside stream; first plate; from a portfolio of forty mounted cliché-verre prints by five artists.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1341285&partId=1&searchText=corot+Ostia&page=1)

Condition: superb impression in pristine condition by Le Garrec with verification stamp of authenticity (verso).

 I am selling this large original print by, Corot, one of the most famous artists of the 19th century, for a total cost of AU$986 (currently US$759.74/EUR678.07/GBP582.06 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this exceedingly rare cliché verre print (i.e. a drawing inscribed through an opaque emulsion applied to a glass plate that is then placed over a sheet of light sensitive paper and exposed original glass print using a photographic process on light please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


One of the seductive attributes of making cliché-verre prints (i.e. “a print made by placing photographic paper beneath a glass plate on which a design has been scratched through a coating of an opaque substance and then exposing it to light” [https://www.britannica.com/art/cliche-verre]) is the relative ease with which an inscribing instrument can glide over the glass plate. Corot is clearly liberated by the process, as his line work in this print is freely laid. Corot’s approach to achieving tonal variation using this process is the same that employed by pen-and-ink artists who only use full-strength ink: Corot compacts his line work in areas of shadow and varies the amount of white paper left between each stroke to represent different intensities of light.

Regarding the “Quarante Cliché-Glaces” series of cliché verre prints that this large and exceedingly rare print was extracted, the curator of the British Museum offers the following information:
“From a portfolio of forty individually mounted cliché-verre prints by Corot, Daubigny, Delacroix, Millet and Rousseau, printed from plates held in the collection of M. Cuvelier (Paris: Maurice Le Garrec, 1921); with title page, list of plates and 'avertissement', each mount and title page stamped with the series number in blue ink; edition 8/150. The verso of each print also bears a stamp, possibly that of the Edmond Sagot studio (the title page states that Le Garrec was the successor to Sagot). The department also holds a cliché-verre plate by Corot ( ) which was donated by M. Cuvelier after the printing of this series.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1341297&partId=1&searchText=1922,0410.213&page=1).




Sunday, 7 August 2016

uyken’s 1704 engraving of Herod’s army fighting robbers in their caves


Jan (Johannes) Luyken (1649–1712) and Caspar Luyken (1672–1708)

“Herodes Beoorlogt de Roovers inde Rotsen door Soldaaten die in Kisten aan yzere kettingen hangende door windaasen neergelaaten worden” [“Herod fights the robbers in their caves” or “Herod conquers Jerusalem” or “Herod waging war the (?) on the Rock Cliffs by the Soldiers hanging by boxes suspended by iron chains coming down on (?) the people below (?) (see: http://www.antiquarianbiblical.com/pages/prints/printot/luykeno/luykeno.htm], 1704, published by Jan Covens (1697–1774) and Corneille Mortier (1688 active) in “Josephus Flavius & Basnage, Alle de werken” in the 1729 edition. (Note the first edition was published by Pieter Mortier in 1704, the second edition was published by Covens and Mortier in 1729, and the third edition was by Frans Houttuyn in 1747.)

Copper engraving on heavy laid paper with wide margins and centre fold (as published)
Size: (sheet) 47.8 x 57.4 cm; (plate) 33 x 42.5 cm
Lettered in the plate below the image borderline: (left) “Edit. à J. Cóvens et C. Mortier.”; (centre) “Herodes Beoorlogt de Roovers inde Rotsen door Soldaaten die in Kisten aan yzere kettingen hangende door windaasen neergelaaten worden”; (right) “Pag. 355” / “62”
Hollstein (Jan Luyken)

Condition: crisp impression with wide margins and centrefold (as published) professionally conserved on a fine archival support sheet to preserve the centrefold. The sheet is in superb condition for its age (i.e. there is no foxing, noteworthy stains or folds).

I am selling this large original engraving from 1704 by Jan Luyken and his son for a total cost of AU$136 (currently US$103.61/EUR93.54/GBP79.26 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this visually arresting scene of Roman battle engineering, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Not only is this print very large but the portrayed battle scene is equally grand in its conception and breadth of what is presented. Luyken really knew how to showcase a battle! I suspect that I am not alone in being transfixed by all the featured gore and the mechanics of the Roman strategy for eradicating robbers in mountainside caves. For instance, I love the Roman’s engineering feat shown here of using a gigantic pulley system for lowering soldiers in boxes. I am also fascinated that nearly each rock pinnacle has a figure standing on it with arms theatrically raised. Moreover, the dark forces within me shamefully marvel—with repugnant horror—at the grisly positions of the falling and fallen robbers.





Saturday, 6 August 2016

Théophile Chauvel’s etching of the Forest at Fontainebleau after Théodore Rousseau


Théophile Chauvel (aka Théophile Narcisse Chauvel; Théophile-Narcisse Chauvel) (1831–c1914) after Théodore Rousseau (1812–67)

“Une mare—Forêt de Fontainebleau”, 1874, printed by François Liénard (1860s–1880s; fl. c.) and published in “L'Art”, 1876.
Etching on laid paper with 3.8 cm chainlines and trimmed at, or within, the platemark (as published in “L'Art”).
Size: (sheet) 28.4 x 39.8 cm; (image borderline) 24.6 x 29.6 cm
Lettered in the plate below the image borderline: (lower left) “Th. Rousseau, pinx.” / “L'Art.”; (lower centre) “UNE MARE - FORÉT DE FONTAINEBLEAU.” / “Collection de Mr. William T. Blodgett.”; (lower right) “Th. Chauvel, sc.” /  “F.çois Liénard, Imp. Paris.”
IFF 31 (Inventaire du Fonds Français: Bibliothèque Nationale, Département des Estampes, Paris, 1930)
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“A pond in a clearing of the forest at Fontainebleau; a figure standing by the pond, at centre, surrounded by trees; after Théodore Rousseau; published in 'L'Art', 1876. 1874” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3350959&partId=1&searchText=Chauvel+Rousseau&page=1)
Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression in pristine condition.

I am selling this literally dazzling etching in (rare) perfect condition, for a total cost of AU$89 (currently US$67.80/EUR61.21/GBP51.87 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this simply stunning etching after Rousseau, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Chauvel is one of my favourite nineteenth century etchers in term of his ability to display skill without resorting to impersonal formulaic approaches to representation.

Although Chauvel was a regular exhibitor at the Salon from 1858 to 1904 and was awarded the prestigious Legion of Honour in 1896, he is best known for his graphic interpretations of other artist’s paintings, such as this print after a painting by Théodore Rousseau, rather than for his own compositions. Regardless of his reputation as a reproductive etcher (i.e. an artist that “translates” paintings into etchings), Chauvel could draw like an angel—presuming angels can draw—and one only has to examine his line work in portraying the intricacies of Rousseau’s cloud formations to understand what I mean. For instance, in this etching he is able to illustrate the transparency of clouds rendered in oil paint and could do this in a way that a viewer could visualise the form of the cloud mass as well as subtle movements within the mass. Simply amazing!

Chauvel’s skill as an etcher is even acknowledged by FL Leipik—a writer who is not shy in offering unapologetic, blunt assessments of artists in his “A History of French Etching” (1924). Leipik saw in Chauvel an artist who, “though eclectic, does not convey the impression of slavish imitation” (p. 128). Leipik also insightfully proposes that if “sensitive adaptability prevented Chauvel from working in a fashion of his own, it fitted him eminently for the interpretation of others” (ibid).