Gallery of prints for sale

Thursday, 22 August 2019

Maria Sibylla Merian's engraving, “Plate VII: Prunier fleuri”, 1679


Maria Sibylla Merian (aka Maria Sibylla Graff) (1647–1717)

“Plate VII: Prunier fleuri” (Flowering Plum, caterpillar and butterfly), 1679–1683, published as plate 7 in Merian’s “De europische Insecten” (aka “Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung, und sonderbare Blumennahrung” [The Wondrous Transformation of Caterpillars and their Strange Diet of Flowers]) editions from 1679/83 until 1730. The page format of this impression suggests that his impression is from the earlier edition as in the final 1730 edition the prints are clustered four to a page and the title text is erased (see an online copy of the 1730 edition with the publication details at archive.org https://archive.org/details/gri_33125008530400/page/n12).

Engraving on laid paper, coloured by hand in watercolour (presumably at the time of publication) with full margins as published and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 23.4 x 16.8 cm; (plate) 14.8 x 11 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (upper right corner) “VII”; (lower centre) “Prunier fleuri.”
Lifetime impression (based on the format of the page which suggests that it is from one of the first editions).

Regarding the edition size, Florence F.J.M. Pieters & Diny Winthagen (1999) in “Maria Sibylla Merian, naturalist and artist (1647-1717): a commemoration on the occasion of the 350th anniversity of her birth” (“Archives of Natural History”, 26 [1]) advise:
“… her books were very rare, editions probably not exceeding 100 copies, and consequently very expensive for scientists — especially the coloured copies: the subscription prices of a coloured versus an uncoloured copy of her book on Surinam insects were 45 and 15 Dutch guilders” (p. 10). Note that “the pay of a Dutch ocean-going sailor came to 9 guilders a month during the entire seventeenth and eighteenth centuries” (ibid). [https://pure.uva.nl/ws/files/956970/80552_327018.pdf]).

Condition: crisp, near faultless and very well preserved impression (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing), laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this rare engraving by the first woman artist-naturalist to publish her findings that catapillars—described in Merian’s day one of the "beasts of the devil"—were not "’born of mud’ by spontaneous generation” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Sibylla_Merian), but that they were a stage in the metamorphoses of the butterfly, for the total cost of AU$257 (currently US$173.87/EUR156.92/GBP143.06 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this lifetime impression of one of the first coloured botanical studies ever published—mindful that the colours were chosen for their accuracy and that the artist recorded the plants from which pigments could be derived at a time when the guild system disallowed women from painting in oils (see Wikipedia about this artist)—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Hendrik Goltzius' engraving, “Giovanni de' Medici in a Duel”, c1575


(Attributed to) Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617)

“Giovanni de' Medici in a Duel” (aka “Duel on Horseback”; “Giovanni De’ Medici Beats his Opponent in a Cavalry Battle”), c1578/1583, plate 5 from the series of 22 plates, “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi” (transl. “The Medici Family’s Successes Victories and Triumphs”) (aka The History of the Medici), after Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Johannes Stradanus; Giovanni della Strada; Jan van der Straeten; Giovanni Statenensis; Giovanni Stradano) (1523–1605), published by Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612) in Haarlem.

Note: The Curator of the British Museum advises that the Rijksmuseum holds a related drawing (see BM no. Ii,5.169).

Engraving on fine laid paper with watermark trimmed close to the platemark with narrow margins around the image borderline.
Size: (sheet) 22 x 29.6 cm; (image borderline) 20.2 x 29.4 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “Joh. Stradanus inue. P.Galle excudit”.
Numbered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “5”.
Lettered in two lines of Latin on plate below the image borderline: “Joh. Med. hostem fortiss. ad singulare certamen prouocantem hasta per loricam pectore/ Transfixo exequo exanimem reliquit”
State ii (of ii)
This impression is from the first edition with Philips Galle as the publisher. There is an (alleged) second edition published by Theodor Galle and a third edition published by Johannes Galle.
(See explanation of the three editions offered by Lombardia Beni Culturali:

TIB 3(3).286(87)–1(2) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Hendrik Goltzius”, vol. 3, p. 253, cat. no. 286 [87]); Hollstein Dutch 330;

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Giovanni de' Medici in a Duel; Giovanni remains on his horse holding a broken lance while his opponent, at right, has fallen wounded from his horse; the duellists are in an arena with assembled spectators. 1583”.

See also the Rijksmuseum’s description of this print:
(Transl.) “Giovanni de' Medici has just knocked his opponent off his horse with his lance. The two are inside a fence, surrounded by a lot of horsemen. Two lines of Latin below the show. This print is part of a 22-part series of prints from the history of Giovanni de 'Medici, called' dalle Bande Nere '.”

Walter L Strauss (1982) in TIB, vol. 3 (Commentary) offers the following description of this print and insights provided by EKJ Reznicek (1980) in “Simiolus 10”:
“Giovanni de' Medici is shown with his lance broken; his opponent, breast pierced by the tip of Medici's lance, is falling off his horse. Reznicek notes a similarity in the face of the dislodged rider to Jan van Hemessen's painting of 1566, ‘Christ Driving the Money Changers from the Temple’ at Nancy (exhibition catalogue ‘Le seizième siècle européen’, Paris [Petit Palais] 1965–66, no. 166) and to Rubens's ‘Lion Hunt’ in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich” (Stauss, p. 311; Reznicek, p. 201).

Condition: early/lifetime impression (based on the crisp quality of the line showing no sign of wear to the plate and its publication in the first edition as confirmed by the name of the publisher) with no restorations, trimmed close to the image borderline in excellent condition for its age (i.e. there is light age toning but there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this graphically strong and very well preserved engraving for the total cost of AU$402 (currently US$272.54/EUR245.59/GBP224.50 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this lifetime impression of a masterwork from the 16th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Tuesday, 20 August 2019

Workshop of Hendrik Goltzius' engraving, “Apollo Killing Python”, 1589


Workshop of Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617) and executed under Goltzius’ direction. (Note that amongst the students in Golzius’ workshop were the highly distinguished artists: Jacob Matham, Jan Saenredam, Jan Muller, Jacob de Gheyn II and Pieter de Jode.)

“Apollo Killing Python”, 1589, from the series of fifty-two prints (of an originally planned 300), “Metamorphoses from Ovid”, published in Haarlem in 1589 by Hendrik Goltzius/Claes Jansz. Visscher (1587–1652) in “Metamorphoses Book I.”

Engraving on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 17.8 x 25.6 cm; (image borderline) 16.8 x 25.2 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline with four lines of Latin verses in two columns by Franco Estius (fl.1580s–1594): "Immensum certis strauit ... / ... necat atq mari." 
State i (of ii) before numbering.

TIB 3 (3). 43 (105) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Hendrik Goltzius”, vol. 3, p. 319, cat. no. 43 (105); New Hollstein Dutch 544–1(2).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate 13: Apollo killing the Python; the god standing at left and pointing a big bow at the monster; after Hendrik Goltzius.”

See also the description of this print offered by the Rijksmuseum:
(Transl.) “Apollo kills the snake Python with many arrows (depicted here as a dragon). In the bottom margin a four-line explanation, in two columns, in Latin.”

Condition: an exceptionally rare lifetime impression before numbering, richly inked and well-printed, trimmed with small margins around the image borderline. The sheet is laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper to flatten the centre-fold of publication. There are a few stains retouched with watercolour to make them virtually invisible—in the distant sea below the arrow and on the first loop of the Python’s tail—otherwise the sheet is in excellent condition with no tears, holes, abrasions, or foxing.

(Please note that this is the second impression of this print that I have listed—the previous impression has been sold.)

I am selling this stunning, lifetime impression of a print that is very seldom seen on the market for the total cost of AU$460 (currently US$311.80/EUR281.43/GBP257.92 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this fabulous engraving from the 16th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Monday, 19 August 2019

Max Pietschmann's mezzotint, "The Bather", 1903


Max Pietschmann (aka Ernst Max Pietschmann; Francois Laubnitz) (1865–1952)
"The Bather", 1903, published by The Studio (magazine) in London in the special supplement edited by Charles Holme, “Representative Art of Our Time”, 1903.

Mezzotint printed in sepia coloured ink on cream laid paper, unsigned as published, backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 32.4 x 22.9 cm; (plate) 27.8 x 19.9 cm; (image borderline) 24.1 x 18.5 cm.

The Yale University offers a description of this print:

Condition: richly inked and well-printed, faultless impression in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use), laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this remarkably beautiful and poetic mezzotint by an artist famous for his figure studies—no doubt underpinned by his life class training at the Académie Julian in Paris—for AU$214 (currently US$145.01/EUR130.61/GBP119.73 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this dream-like image of a nude young woman potrayed with great delicacy in evening light as she bathes her leg while resting on the bank of a stream, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Sunday, 18 August 2019

Harmen Jansz. Muller's engraving, “Man finds Salvation in the Church of Christ”, 1565


Harmen Jansz. Muller (1540–1617)

“Man finds Salvation in the Church of Christ” (De Mens vindt redding in de kerk van Christus), 1565, plate 4 from the series of five engravings (New Hollstein 445-448), “Christ as the Good Samaritan“, after Maarten van Heemskerck (1498–1574) with lettered verse by classical scholar and Latin poet, Hadrianus Junius (aka Adriaen de Jonghe) (1511–1575), published in Amsterdam.

Engraving on laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 23.2 x 28 cm; (plate) 20.3 x 25 cm; (image borderline) 19.2 x 24.8 cm
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline below St Peter’s right foot: “"MHeemskerck In"; entwined initials of the fecit note at the base of the second column on the left: "HML F".
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: “ILLE NOMISMA … ITER,”
State i (of i); early impression (based on the lines showing minimal signs of wear to the printing plate).

New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 448 (Maarten van Heemskerck) (Ilja Veldman [comp.] 1993–94, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Maarten van Heemskerck”, Roosendaal, Koninklijke Van Poll, vol. 2, p. 134, cat. no. 448); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 66 (The Muller Dynasty [Harmen Jansz Muller]) (Ger Luijten et al. [eds.] 1999, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: The Muller Dynasty”, Rotterdam, Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum Sound and Vision Publ., vol. 1, p. 148, cat. no. 66).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(Transl.) “Man finds salvation in the church of Christ. He stands with folded hands next to Christ, who hands a Bible to Peter. Two church buildings in the background. At the bottom in the margin a verse in Latin. Variant to the parable of the Good Samaritan.”

Note: the British Museum holds the first plate of the series, “Christ as the Good Samaritan“, but the museum does not have this engraving (see the BM curator’s comment for 1875,0710.424).

Condition: a crisp, well-printed early impression with margins (approx. 1.5 cm). The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing) laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this superb early engraving from 1565—the year that Pieter Bruegel the Elder painted “Hunters in the Snow” during what is now called Europe’s “Little Ice Age”—for the total cost of AU$305 (currently US$206.89/EUR186.43/GBP170.35 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this iconic engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold