Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 21 February 2020

Honoré Daumier's lithograph featuring a caricature of Corot, “Aspect de la Seine de Paris à Chatou”, 1851


Honoré Daumier (1808–1879)

“Aspect de la Seine de Paris à Chatou” (View of the Seine from Paris to Chatou), 1851, plate 71 from the series, “Tout Ce Qu'on Voudra” (Anything we want), showing a caricature of Daumier’s friend Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (1796–1875), published by Aubert & Cie (1830s–1880s) in “Le Charivari”, 19 July 1851, in Paris.

Note: Google Translate explains the meaning of the journal title, “Le Charivari”:
“a cacophonous mock serenade, typically performed by a group of people in derision of an unpopular person or in celebration of a marriage”.

Lithograph on fine wove paper with full margins and text verso as published in “Le Charivari”.
Size: (sheet) 36 x 25.4 cm.
Lettered on stone: (upper centre) “TOUT CE QU'ON VOUDRA.”; (upper right) “71.”; (lower left) “Chez Aubert & Cie Pl. de la Bourse, 29. Paris”; (lower centre) “ASPECT DE LA SEINE DE PARIS À CHATOU”; (lower right) “Imp. de Me.Ve.Aubert, 5.r. de l’Abbaye Paris.”
Inscribed on stone: (lower left) “h.D.”; (lower right) “1[…]52”.

State i (?) (of ii) before the addition of an arc of tone in the sky (see the state ii impression at the NGA [inv. no. 2015.143.411])

Delteil  1716 (Loys Delteil 1902, “Le Peintre-Graveur Illustré (XIXe et XXe siècles)”, 31 vols, Paris).

Daumier.org offers the following background about this lithograph:

“A sunny day in July on the banks of the Seine. The winery and fishing village Chatou was connected by rail since 1837 with the capital some 10 km away, and enjoyed great popularity among the Parisians. The gravel beach and calm water in the river bend and fishing spots invited to sport and fun. The ginguettes - village pubs with music - made for the physical well-being. In mid-July, Daumier and his friend Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (16/07/1796 - 02/22/1875), and perhaps also Daubigny, travelled to Chatou to spend a leisurely day. They ate and drank, discussed, explored the area in search of interesting scenic motives, rowed and tried their luck with fishing.

Daumier was not a fisherman. He rather sat in the shadow under a tree and with a mischievous smile did sketches of people who stood patiently at the bank of the river and fished. Corot was also there, immobile and concentrated with an empty creel. A good opportunity for Daumier to perpetuate his friend in a sketchbook and to hand him the drawing as a birthday gift.

The story may have possibly occurred in a similar manner. There is no doubt that Corot had enjoyed being in Chatou. Some images, such as 'The railway bridge of Chatou' clearly attest to this. The fact is that here we have a lithograph that was published almost simultaneously with Corot's birthday. The two days in between would have been just enough to prepare the lithographic stone and to do all the work involved.

Daumier already had a very similar drawing of an angler from 1844 (see DR1240). Thus, it was easy to replace the figures and to transform the angler into Corot with a hint of his facial features”

Brandeis Institutional Repository offers the following description of this print:
“Men are lined up on the banks of the Seine to fish”

Condition: a strong impression in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of handling).

I am selling this confident and loosely drawn lithograph featuring a caricature of one of the most important landscape artists of the nineteenth century— Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot—for AU$181 in total (currently US$119.55/EUR110.73/GBP92.70 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this fascinating caricature of Corot possibly designed as a birthday gift by Daumier and executed 21 years before Corot was able to support his friend by buying him a home when Daumier became blind, homeless and penniless, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Thursday, 20 February 2020

Andrea Zucchi's engraving, “Virginity”, c.1710–24, after Giovanni Battista Tiepolo’s drawing after Corradini’s sculpture


Andrea Zucchi (1679–1740)

“Virginity” (aka “Allegory of Chastity”), c.1710–24, after a drawing by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (aka Giambattista Tiepolo) (1696–1770) of the marble sculpture, “Virginity” (1722–23), by Antonio Corradini (1688–1752), located with the altar of the guild of the “Scuola grande dei Carmini” in the Church of Santa Maria dei Carmini (Venice), published with privilege in Venice with dedication by Zucchi to the art collector, Zaccaria Sagredo (1653–1729).

Engraving with etching printed in sepia coloured ink on laid paper with small margins backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 36.2 x 21.9 cm; (plate) 34.7 x 20.7 cm; (outer image borderline) 34.7 x 20.3 cm.
Lettered on plate within the image borderline along the lower edge: (centre) “A sua Ecc. il Sig. ZACCARIA SAGREDO, che con nobiltà, autorità, beneficenza fauorisce e promuoue/ le belle arti, questo simolacro della VIRGINITÀ, scolpito da Antonio Corradini, a ornamento del tempio e altare/ della B.M.V. del Carmine in Venezia, a perpetua memoria di suo umilissimo ossequio, dona e consacra l'intagliatore/ Andrea Zucchi." (To his Exc. Mr. ZACCARIA SAGREDO, who with nobility, authority, charity favours and promotes fine arts, this simolacrum of VIRGINITY, sculpted by Antonio Corradini, to adorn the temple and altar of the BMV of the Carmine in Venice, in perpetual memory of his humble respect, donates and consecrates the engraver Andrea Zucchi.); (left) “Gio: Batt: Tiepolo del.”
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (centre) “Sopra il ponte de Bareteri, con Priuilegio.”

See the description of this print offered by the bookshop: Libreria Emiliana (Italy):

See also Matej Klemenčič’s essay that offers insight about this print in “Modern Venetian Sheet Impressions after Contemporary Sculpture: Questions of Form and Function” (pp. 108–09):

Condition: well-printed impression with small margins. There are minor abrasions, tears, stains and losses (e.g. there is a worm-hole above the lower cloud at left and losses to the lower right margin). The sheet is laid upon a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this very rare engraving after a drawing by Tiepolo exemplifying this master’s ability to give an aura of grandeur to a portrayed subject—note the low viewpoint and the slightly backward lean to the marble sculpture to give the impression of otherworldly spiritual transcendence—for AU$438 in total (currently US$290.23/EUR268.72/GBP225.31 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this engraving executed with exceptional sensitivity in the glorious Venetian Baroque period style, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.












Wednesday, 19 February 2020

Seymour Haden’s drypoint, “Windmill Hill, No. 2”, 1877



Francis Seymour Haden (aka Sir Francis Seymour Haden; H Dean [used for RA exhibitions]) (1818–1910)

“Windmill Hill, No. 2”, 1877, pencil signed by the artist at lower right.

According to The Fitzwilliam Museum’s (2018) exhibition essay, “Amateur Artist of Distinction: Prints by Francis Seymour Haden” (see https://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/sites/default/files/exhibitions/Amateur%20Etcher%20of%20Distinction.pdf):
“Windmill Hill is the name of a high common near Swanage. This is one of 17 plates executed in a fortnight during a stay at Newton Manor in Dorset with a fellow amateur artist and collector, Sir John Charles Robinson (1824-1913), who also produced etchings done on the spot of the same landscape” (p. 110).

Drypoint printed in a warm-black ink on cream laid paper.
Size: (sheet) 19.6 x 29.9 cm; (plate) 15 x 22.5 cm.
Signed in plate, at lower left: "Seymour Haden/ 1877".
Signed in graphite, at lower right below the platemark: "Seymour Haden".

State iv (of v) with final modifications to the image before the plate is cancelled in the final state (e.g. “Some of the previous work on trees at upper left removed and their outlines redrawn with diagonal strokes” [Schneiderman 153 IV]).

Schneiderman 153 (Richard S Schneiderman 1983, “A Catalogue Raisonné of the Prints of Sir Francis Seymour Haden”, Wiltshire, Robin Garton Ltd, p. 317, cat. no. 153 IV); Harrington 164 (Henry Nazeby Harrington 1910, “The Engraved Work of Sir Francis Seymour Haden, P.R.E.: an illustrated and descriptive catalogue”, Liverpool, H. Young and Sons, cat. no. 164).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“A heath with small bushes at centre, in the foreground; trees seen in the background”

See also the description of this print at the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

Condition: richly inked and faultless impression with margins in near pristine condition considering the age of the print (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use—apart from pencil notations by previous collectors and a faint collector’s stamp verso).

I am selling this superb, museum quality, pencil signed masterpiece of drypoint by arguably one of the finest printmakers of the nineteenth century for AU$510 in total (currently US$341.51/EUR316/GBP263 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally beautiful drypoint of the rugged terrain near Swanage (South West England) rendered with loose—almost calligraphic—velvety strokes of richly inked burred lines, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Tuesday, 18 February 2020

Michel Dorigny's engraving, “The Destruction of Niobe's Children”, 1651, after Simon Vouet



Michel Dorigny (1616–1665)

“The Destruction of Niobe's Children” (aka “Death of Niobe’s Children” (Dood van Niobes kinderen [Rijksmuseum title]), 1651, from a suite of nine plates, “Mythological or Allegorical Subjects” (Robert-Dumesnil [1835] nos. 123–131; see https://archive.org/details/bnf-bpt6k65579588/page/n315/mode/2up), after a painting by Simon Vouet (1590–1649), published with royal privilege from Louis XIV (King of France).

Etching and engraving on laid paper
Size: (sheet) 36 x 28.8 cm; (plate) 25.4 x 20.9 cm; (image borderline) 21.5 x 19.4 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “S. Voüet pinxit”; (centre) “Cum privilegio Regis”; (right) “Mich. Dorigny Sculp. 1651.”

IFF 125 (Département des Estampes 1939–, “Inventaire du Fonds, Français: graveurs du XVIIe siècle”, Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale, vol. 3, p. 488, cat. 125); Robert-Dumesnil 1835-71 IV.297.125 (A P F Robert-Dumesnil 1835, “Le Peintre-Graveur Français”, vol. 4, Paris, [Bouchard-Huzard], p. 297, cat. 125).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The slaying of the Niobids by Apollo and Diana, with the latter in the upper right firing arrows to kill the fourteen sons and daughters of Niobe who is in foreground left shielding herself”

See also the description of this print at the Rijksmuseum:

For those unfamiliar with the story of Niobe illustrated here, she was the proud mother of fourteen children (seven boys and seven girls) who regrettably boasted about her fecundity and ridiculed Leto (the mother of Apollo and Artemis) about Leto’s poor performance in the art of baby-making. In response to Niobe’s hubris and offensive lack of tact, Leto let loose her children (Apollo and Artemis shown in the sky) to kill all of Niobe’s children with poisoned arrows. Shocking! Even more disturbing, all of Niobe’s dead children were left unburied for nine days while Niobe lamented and stopped eating as she turned to stone.

Condition: well-printed impression with wide margins. The sheet is in excellent condition for its considerable age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this allegorical engraving about hubris and the outcome of hurtful boasting, for AU$266 (currently US$177.87/EUR164.20/GBP136.46 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this graphically strong scene from classical mythology, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Monday, 17 February 2020

Raphael Sadeler II’s engraving, “Seascape with Christ Walking on Water”, c.1615, after Paul Bril


Raphael Sadeler II (1584–1632)

“Seascape with Christ Walking on Water” (aka “Seascape with Christ and his disciples in the storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee” [Zeegezicht met Christus en zijn leerlingen in de storm op het meer van Galilea]), c.1615 (1599–1632), after Paul Bril (aka Paulus Brill; Paolo Brillo) (1553/4–1626)

Engraving on laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 27.2 x 34.4 cm; (plate) 20.2 x 27.4 cm; (image borderline) 19.4 x 27.2 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “P. Bril inuentor”; (right) “Raphael Sadeler iun. Scalpsit”.
State i (of i)

Hollstein Dutch 50 (Dieuwke de Hoop Scheffer [comp.] 1980, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts ca. 1450–1700: Aegidius Sadeler to Raphael Sadeler II”, vol. 21, [text], Amsterdam, Van Gendt & Co, p. 278, cat. 50).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Seascape with Christ walking on water in lower right, a ship on a choppy sea at left, St Peter walking towards Christ at centre, smaller boats and a city in background; after Paul Bril”

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum:
(transl.) “A maritime landscape. On the left, the disciples of Christ sail over the Sea of ​​Galilee in a boat during a storm. Christ follows them over the water on the left. Peter walks over the water towards Christ. He threatens to drown but Christ saves him”

Condition: excellent early impression (based on no evidence of wear to the printing plate), but with a flattened printer’s crease at centre and restored tears in lower margin. Beyond the restoration of tears, the sheet is otherwise in a clean condition with no foxing or significant stains.

Note that this is a second impression of this engraving that I have posted. The previous copy has been sold.

I am selling this remarkably strong engraving showing a sparkling light filled scene following a storm and the miracle of St Peter walking—but sadly also starting to sink because of his lack of faith—on a wind-whipped sea towards Christ who is also walking on water in the foreground, for AU$384 (currently US$258.24/EUR238.08/GBP197.98 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this marvellous engraving of vast space animated with natural and biblical drama, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.