Gallery of prints for sale

Monday, 9 December 2019

Paul Rajon's etching, “Portrait of Gerard Dou”


Paul Rajon (aka Paul Adolphe Rajon) (1843–1888)
“Portrait of Gerard Dou” (aka “His own Portrait” [published title]; “The Painter’s own Portrait”), 1876, after Gerard Dou’s (aka Gerrit Dou; Gerard Dow) (1613–1675) possible self-portrait in the National Gallery, London (inv.nr.NG192), published in 1876 by Seeley, Jackson & Halliday (London) (fl.1867–1880) in Philip Gilbert Hamerton’s (ed.) “The Portfolio: An Artist Periodical”, bound in-between pages 32–33.
Etching on cream laid paper with generous margins and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 35 x 24.1 cm; (plate) 19 x 14.8 cm; (image borderline) 16.8 x 13,2 cm
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline and following the inscription on the original painting in background at right: “CDOV”. (G. DOU)
(Scratch) inscribed on plate below the image borderline: (centre) “P. Rajon aq. ft."
The National Gallery (London) offers the following insights about Gerard Dou’s (possible) self-portrait, “Portrait of a Man”, 1635-40 (oil on oak, 18.9 x 14.7 cm):
“In this tiny portrait, an affable young man turns towards us, settling his elbow over the back of his chair. His pipe is paused and he meets our gaze with an easy, relaxed look. Perhaps he has just taken a puff; the tobacco is glowing and smoke twists upwards from the bowl. Other minute details – from the pattern of the gold braid on the man’s hat to the reflections in his eyes – add to the atmosphere, and it is through such meticulous painting that Gerrit Dou has managed to capture the sense of a moment in time, rather than just a deadpan likeness. But the realism belies the point of the painting. Until recently it was thought to be a self portrait, but the similarities with known paintings of Dou are too generic for us to be sure. It is more likely that this is a tronie – an image of a stock character – which were highly popular in the Netherlands at the time.”
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Portrait of Gerard Dou; half-length turned to the left, facing the viewer; wearing a beret and holding a pipe; within oval; after Gerrit Dou”
See also the description of this print offered by the National Galleries of Scotland:
Condition: richly inked and well-printed (near faultless) lifetime impression showing no sign of wear to the printing plate, with generous margins. Beyond minor imperfections in the paper the sheet is in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing) laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.
I am selling this strong etching arguably featuring a self-portrait of one of Rembrandt’s most famous students (Gerard Dou)—interestingly, an artist purported by R N Wornum in “The Portfolio” (1876) to paint “under an umbrella to protect his work from dust” (p. 33)—for a total cost of AU$185 (currently US$126.31/EUR114.13/GBP95.96 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).
If you are interested in purchasing this subtly executed etching—note the exquisite transitions of tone in the rendering of the face that require magnification to see the individual strokes—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.












Sunday, 8 December 2019

Philips Galle's engraving, “Giovanni de Medici Surrounded at Rome”, 1583


Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)
“Giovanni de Medici Surrounded at Rome” (aka “Giovanni, Surrounded by Armed Men at Rome, Defends Himself” [TIB title]), 1582/3, plate 1 to the series of twenty-one engravings (including the title plate), “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi”, after Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Ioannes Stradanus) (1523–1605), published by Philips Galle in Antewerp.
Engraving on laid paper trimmed around the platemark.
Size: (sheet) 22.3 x 29.7 cm.
Lettered on plate within the image borderline: (centre of lower edge) “Johannes Stradanus inventor. Philippus Galle sculpsit et excudit.”
Numbered and lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “1”; (centre in two lines of Latin) “Johannes Medices …/ …Funditq[ue].”
State i (of ii) lifetime impression.
TIB 5601.102:2 (Arno Dolders [ed.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, p. 385, cat. no. [5601].102:2); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 353.I (Johannes Stradanus) (Marjolein Leesberg [comp.] 2008, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Johannes Stradanus”, vol. 3, Amsterdam, Sound and Vision Rijksmuseum, p. 40, cat. no. 353); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 489.2 (Philips Galle) (Manfred Sellink [comp.] 2001, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, vol. 3, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision p. 192; p. 199. cat. no. 489); Baroni Vannucci 1997 691.14 (Alessandra Baroni Vannucci 1997, “Jan van der Straet, detto Giovanni Stradano, flandrus pictor et inventor”, Milan, Jandi Sapi Editori).
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate numbered 1: Giovanni de' Medici surrounded at Rome; two armies fighting at the bridge of Castel Sant'Angelo; to right, [children] and the elderly fleeing; at centre, in the foreground, two army leaders confronting each other.”
The Rijksmuseum offers the following description:
(transl.) “The young Giovanni de Medici, called 'dalle Bande Nere', is surrounded by members of the Orsini family during a street fight on the [Castel Sant'Angelo bridge]. He slaps wildly with his sword and flees the besiegers. The print has a Latin caption and is part of a series about the family history of the De 'Medici family.”
Condition: well-printed lifetime impression showing no sign of wear to the printing plate, trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderline. Beyond minor age-toning (appropriate to the age of the impression), the sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).
I am selling this rare impression of the first plate (following the title plate) to the series, “History of the Medici”, for a total cost of AU$304 (currently US$207.98/EUR187.95/GBP158.41 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).
If you are interested in purchasing this amazing engraving full of action and I must point out the compositionally daring use of the soldier's foot on the left that “steps” over the image borderline to reflexively draw the viewer into the pictorial space of the scene, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.
This print has been sold











Saturday, 7 December 2019

Philips Galle's engraving, “Title Plate: History of the Medici”, 1583


Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)
“Title Plate: History of the Medici” (aka “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi”), 1583, title plate to the series of twenty-one engravings (including this plate), “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi”, after Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Ioannes Stradanus) (1523–1605), published by Philips Galle in Antewerp.
Engraving on laid paper trimmed around the platemark.
Size: (sheet) 20.9 x 27.9 cm.
Lettered on plate within the image borderline: (armorial banderole) “PLVS […] OVLTRE” [More]; (cartouche at centre) “MEDICEAE FAMILIAE/ RERVM FELICITER GESTARVM/ VICTORIAE ET TRIUMPHI./ Elegantissimis iconibus à Iohanne Stradano Flandro,/ artificiosissimo penicillo delineate et à/ Philippo Gallæo in æs/ incisa, et edita./1583.”
Lettered on plate below the image borderline in two lines of Latin text: “INGENIO ET GENIO NOBILI DNO AMBROSIO MARIENBERGO, OMNIS GENERIS PICTVRAE/ ET ELEGANTIARVM ADMIRATORI, PHILIPP. GALLAEVS L.M. DEDICABAT.”
State i (of iii) lifetime impression.
TIB 5601.102:1 (Arno Dolders [ed.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, p. 384, cat. no. [5601].102:1); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 352.I (Johannes Stradanus) (Marjolein Leesberg [comp.] 2008, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Johannes Stradanus”, vol. 3, Amsterdam, Sound and Vision Rijksmuseum, p. 39, cat. no. 352); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 488.I (Philips Galle) (Manfred Sellink [comp.] 2001, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, vol. 3, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision, p. 192, cat. no. 488); Baroni Vannucci 1997 691 (Alessandra Baroni Vannucci 1997, “Jan van der Straet, detto Giovanni Stradano, flandrus pictor et inventor”, Milan, Jandi Sapi Editori).
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Title Plate to a series of twenty-one prints on the military deeds of Giovanni de' Medici; at centre a cartouche lettered with title and authors; a coat of arms surmounting the cartouche and four captives seen at top and bottom of the cartouche; the Medici coat of arms seen on both sides with various military motives, including armoury; with dedication to Ambrosius of Marienbourg.”
The Rijksmuseum offers the following description:
(transl.) “Cartouche with the title of the series: Mediceae Familiae rerum feliciter gestarum victoriae et triumphi. Around the cartouche weaponry (armour, bladed weapons, drums, guns and banners) and four prisoners, hands tied behind their backs. Top left and top right successively the arms of Giovanni de 'Medici (nicknamed dalle Bande Nere) and Cosimo I de' Medici. The latter crowned and with the order of the golden fleece. The weapon directly above the cartouche refers to the Habsburg emperors. It is a double-headed eagle with the coat of arms of Austria on the chest. In addition, the order of the golden fleece and the two columns of Hercules with the motto of Charles V: Plus oultre.”
Condition: richly inked and near faultless lifetime impression trimmed with a thread margin around the image borderline. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).
I am selling this superb lifetime impression of the title plate to the series, “History of the Medici”, for a total cost of AU$304 (currently US$207.98/EUR187.95/GBP158.41 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).
If you are interested in purchasing this fabulous title plate that is a true tropaion monument to the military deeds and power of Giovanni de' Medici, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.
This print has been sold











Friday, 6 December 2019

Alexander Runciman's etching, “Cormar Attacking the Spirit of the Waters”, 1774


Alexander Runciman (1736–1785)
“Cormar Attacking the Spirit of the Waters”, 1774, illustration inspired by an episode in “Fingal” (see https://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ossian/oss24.htm) in James Macpherson's (1736–1796) “The Works of Ossian” (1765)—a reputed translation of the oral cycle of Gaelic poetry of the (possibly) legendary narrator/poet, Ossian. This composition relates to the cycle of ceiling paintings by Runciman in Penicuik House (Midlothian, Scotland) destroyed by fire in 1899.
Etching on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 7.5 x 12.8 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (lower edge) "ARunciman [“AR” in monogram] inv & [in reverse] fecit […]  [“Uid Fiingul” faint and not fully decipherable and perhaps a reference to Fingal].
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Cormar standing at a deck in profile to left, his left foot forward, about to grab the spirit in a wave on the left with his right hand, a sword in his left, three other figures in the right background.”
Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression, trimmed along the platemark in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, significant stains or foxing), laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.
I am selling this small but visually arresting etching executed with confident spontaneity and creative invention—note how the freely sketched figures (water spirits) fleeing the central figure (Cormar) are convincingly portrayed as whisper-like apparitions—for a total cost of AU$330 (currently US$225.76/EUR204.02/GBP171.95 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).
If you are interested in purchasing this gem of Scottish printmaking capturing some of the passion of Goya and William Blake, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold







Alexander Runciman's etching, “Agrippina with the Ashes of Germanicus", c.1774.


Alexander Runciman (1736–1785)
“Agrippina with the Ashes of Germanicus", c.1774.
Etching on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 13.4 x 10.6 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (lower edge) "ARunciman [“AR” in monogram] […] [“ïnv 74”? illegible text].
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Death of Germanicus: Agrippina the Elder sitting on a stool in profile to left, holding an urn on her lap which is lettered with his name; a servant standing on the left, weeping by covering her eyes with her hand, Gaius beside her looking up to Agrippina.”
Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression, trimmed along the platemark in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing) laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.
I am selling this fascinating composition—like many of Runciman’s designs—referencing classical Roman bas-reliefs appropriate to the portrayed subject of Agrippina the Elder (c.14 BC–AD 33)—regarded by the Romans of the time as a woman of impeccable character after starving herself to death following torture (a beating so severe that she was blinded) for promulgating the idea that her husband was murdered—holding the urn of her husband’s ashes, for a total cost of AU$330 (currently US$225.76/EUR204.02/GBP171.95 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).
If you are interested in purchasing this freely executed and graphically strong etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold