Monday, 30 May 2016


Adolphe Martial Potémont (1828–83) (aka Adolphe Martial and Adolphe Martial- Potémont)

“Vieux Chênes au Bas-Bréau” [old oak trees in Bas-Bréau—a section of Fontainebleau forest], Plate 11, 1878, published by Alfred Cadart (1828–75) in “L'Eau-Forte”

Etching on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 38 x 34.7 cm; (plate) 31 x 26 cm; (image) 29.5 x 24.5 cm

Inscribed with the artists initials/monogram at the lower left edge of the image and lettered below the image: (lower left) “A. P. Martial. del. et sc.”; (lower centre) “VIEUX CHÊNES AU BAS-BRÉAU”; (lower right) “Vve A. Cadart Edit Imp. 56 Bard Haussmann Paris."


Condition: marvellously rich and well-inked impression with good margins. The sheet has glue stains in the margins (recto) but is otherwise in good condition (i.e. there are no tears, foxing or blemishes beyond the glue marks).


I am selling this magnificent image of ancient oaks in the Fontinebleau Forest made famous by the Barbizon school of artists for the total cost of AU$132 (currently US$94.81/EUR85.13/GBP64.85 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this forest scene exemplifying the spirit of the Barbizon School, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


I purchased this print many years ago for the simple reason: it was beautiful—stunning beautiful! I then sought to acquire more prints by the artist with the mistaken idea that his other prints would be equally richly worked and gorgeous. Sadly, I discovered that his other images were not so romantic. Indeed, I was somewhat shocked to discover that his earlier work, featuring mainly architectural views, matched what FL Leipnik in his unreserved assessment of artists in “A History of French Etching from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day” (1924) describes as “indifferent etching and lack of feeling …” (p. 125).

Regardless of what may be seen as emotional dryness of his earlier prints (e.g. his series of 300 etchings of Paris published in three volumes between 1862 and 1866 and his series of 12 etchings of “The Women of Paris during the War”), this particular print along with another landscape etching, “La Montée”, earned the praise of Leipnik who perceived it as having “incomparably greater merit” (ibid).




Sunday, 29 May 2016



De Demanne after the illustration by Deshayes published in Paris by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Duchesne in "Guide de la Culture des Bois, ou Herbier Forestier," (the atlas contains 64 lithographs), 1826

“Pin sauvage dit d’Ecosse ou de Genêve” [Wild Pine from Scotland or Geneva], 1825–26
Lithograph on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 42 x 27.4 cm

Inscribed (lower right) “Deshayes delt.”; (lower centre) “Pin sauvage dit d’Ecosse ou de Genêve.”; (lower right) “Lith: de Demanne.”

Condition: rich impression with generous margins. There is light spotting, otherwise the sheet is in excellent condition for its age.



I am selling this exceptionally fine lithograph along with the next lithograph I am listing, “Pin maritime ou de Bordeaux” by the same artist, (i.e. two lithographs by Demanne after Deshayes) for AU$110 in total (currently US$79.04/EUR71.10/GBP54.05 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this pair of botanical drawings, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.




De Demanne after the illustration by Deshayes published in Paris by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Duchesne in "Guide de la Culture des Bois, ou Herbier Forestier," (the atlas contains 64 lithographs), 1826

“Pin maritime ou de Bordeaux” [Maritime Pine], 1825–26
Lithograph on wove paper
Size: (sheet) 42 x 27.4 cm

Inscribed (lower right) “Deshayes delt.”; (lower centre) “Pin maritime ou de Bordeaux.”; (lower right) “Lith: de Demanne.”

Condition: rich impression with generous margins. There is spotting, otherwise the sheet is in good condition for its age.




Recently I had an interesting discussion with a long-distance internet friend about a woodblock print by the legendary Japanese printmaker, Hiroshige. The point of interest in our short discussion concerned Hiroshige’s choice to separate the key subject of the print (viz. travellers on horseback and walking) from the representation of falling snow depicted behind them. My standpoint was that by showing the figures set against a background of falling snow was not as visually satisfying as immersing the figures within a veil of snow falling all around them.

If I may now link that discussion with this pair of prints, I wish to suggest that the artists who drew these botanical illustrations (Demanne, the lithographer and Deshayes, the designer) are like artists who allow falling snow to be in front of the key subject. What I mean by this comment—especially seeing that there is clearly no snow featured in the prints—is that these artists have represented the true way that pine cones and needles are attached to their stems and they have achieved this realism by ensuring that features in the front (i.e. closer to the viewer) obscure those behind. Although I would be hesitant to propose that true scientific objectivity is about not showing everything, in these illustrations there may be the case for an argument.


Gilles Demarteau (1722–76) after Jean-Baptiste Le Prince (1734–81)
“Plate 1, Book 1”, 1773, from “Principes Du Dessin Dans Le Genre Du Paysage”
Crayon-manner stippled etching in sanguine ink on coarse laid paper
Size: (sheet) 43.5 x 30.2 cm; (plate) 26.9 x 20 cm

Inscribed within the plate (upper-centre edge) “Planche premiere. Livre 1 er.”; (lower left) “Le Prince”; (lower right) “Demarteau”; (lower centre) “Pour acquérir la facilite’ de dessiner le paysage, il faut commencer par etudier separément les feuilles de divers arbres propres à la peinture, sans cela il seroit impossible d’y donner le caractere; voyez q, 2, 3, on en dessinera ensuite plusieurs ensemble, à peu-près comme dans la figre 4,avec láttention de les placer de maniere que les masses d’ombre quélles produiront soient assez considerable pour faire valoir les masses de clair.” [Google Translation: To acquire facilitates' to draw the landscape, we must first separate study of the leaves of various trees suitable for painting, otherwise it would be impossible to give the character; see 1, 2, 3, then draw more together, nearly as in figure 4, with attention to the place of way that the masses of which are quite considerable shadow occur to assert the masses of light.] / A Paris chés Demarteau Graveur du Roi, rue de la Pelterie à la Cloche.”

Condition: crisp and well-inked impression with irregular margins (as published). There are minor handling creases otherwise in excellent condition for its age (i.e. the sheet is clean and without tears, stains or foxing).


This print has been sold




Gilles Demarteau (1722–76) after Jean-Baptiste Le Prince (1734–81)
“Plate 3, Book 2”, 1773, from “Principes Du Dessin Dans Le Genre Du Paysage”
Crayon-manner stippled etching in sanguine ink on coarse laid paper
Size: (sheet) 43.4 x 29.9 cm; (plate) 30.5 x 23.6 cm

Inscribed within the plate (upper-centre edge) “Planche 3 eme. Livre 2 eme”; (lower left) “Le Prince”; (lower right) “Demarteau”; (lower centre) “Ceci est une suite de ce qui à été demontré dans La Planche 2e. du Livre 2e. A est un jeune Hètre vu a trente pas. La forme particuliere des feuilles échape à la vuë, et l’on appercoit que la tournure généale de l’arbre, c’est à dire le caractere particulier ou la direction de ses branches.” [Google Translation: This is a result of what was shown in the second board. 2nd Book. A is a young thirty Beechwood seen not. The particular shape of the leaves an Escape to the view, and we perceive that généale turn of the tree, ie the particular character or direction of its branches.] / A Paris chés Demarteau Graveur du Roi, rue de la Pelterie à la Cloche.”

Condition: crisp and well-inked impression with irregular margins (as published). There are minor handling creases otherwise in excellent condition for its age (i.e. the sheet is clean and without tears, stains or foxing).


This print has been sold






Allaert van Everdingen (1621–75)
“Two Men in a Doorway”, 1773 (18th century impression), from the series, “Twelve landscapes” (H.40-51)
Etching on fine laid paper
Size: (sheet) 10.1 x 14 cm
Inscribed with the artist’s monogram (lower right corner) “AVE”.
Bartsch II.186.48; Hollstein 48.II; Dytuit 48.III

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Two men resting at the door of a timber-built cottage; in left foreground; a dead tree and its broken trunk next to a large rock at centre; at right view of a wooded landscape; from a series of twelve plates.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1632462&partId=1&searchText=Allaert+van+Everdingen&page=5)

Condition: crisp but slightly silvery impression with margins around the borderline, but trimmed before plate marks and in good condition. There are remnants of mounting hinges and pencil notes from previous collectors (verso).


I am selling this early etching capturing the spirit of the Nordic landscape for AU$115 in total (currently US$82.63/EUR74.34/GBP56.51 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.




Allaert van Everdingen (1621–75)
“Two Boats Approaching a Hut”, c. 1650 (lifetime impression), from the series, “Four landscapes” (H.30-33).
Etching on fine laid paper
Size: (sheet) 10.2 x 12.9 cm
State iii (of iii). Bartsch II.177.32; Hollstein 32.III

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Two men mooring boats on a river bank; next to a group of houses at centre; a man on a horse-drawn carriage on the country road at left; a castle on a hill on the far bank at right; from a series of four plates.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1632008&partId=1&searchText=Allaert+van+Everdingen&page=2)

Condition: strong, well-inked lifetime impression with no wear to the plate with margins around the borderline, but trimmed on or before plate marks and in excellent condition. There are remnants of mounting hinges and notes from previous collectors (verso).


I am selling this rare, lifetime impression capturing the spirit of the Nordic landscape for AU$225 in total (currently US$161.66/EUR145.44/GBP110.56 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.




When I was looking at these two landscapes, the thought occurred to me about the difference between Everdingen’s experience of village life in the mountains of Sweden and Norway and my very limited experience of small towns in the mountains of Australia. One of the big differences that I perceive is the site where folk in the mountains of Europe tend to situate their houses compared to those living in the mountains of Australia. If I may propose a broad generalisation (that may or may not be true and I am interested in readers’ comments): the Europeans choose to build houses in the mountain valleys with many streams, trees and boulders, whereas the Australians choose the mountain tops so that they can see everything—except nearby streams, trees and boulders.


Fred Williams (1927–82)
“The Engagement Ring”, 1956
Etching on a zinc plate printed on Whatmans paper with much tone left on the plate in the background, signed by the artist in pencil with the edition number “4–12” and the date “56”.
Size: (plate) 15 x 19 cm; (sheet) 22.1 x 15.9 cm
Number 4 in an edition of 12; state i (of ii) (note that in the second state the background is darkened with aquatint rather than plate tone.)
Mollison 88i (reproduced in plate 28)

Condition: very richly inked impression, signed and in near pristine condition.


I am selling this early print from Williams’ London years for AU$4000 (currently US$2874/EUR2585.58/GBP1965.53 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this rare original etching—and one that is often reproduced as an exemplary print of Williams’ early days—by one of Australia’s most famous artists, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


If I were to mention that many of Fred Williams’ early etchings (like this one) were executed in a London music hall because the theatre was a good place to keep warm while working on his plates, I suspect that this information would seem irrelevant. Nevertheless, it isn’t. The small size of the plate was chosen because it was portable and its size wouldn’t inconvenience fellow theatre patrons. Moreover, one only has to think of Williams’ later landscapes, where the terrain is portrayed from a bird’s eye view, to understand the affect of Williams’ time in the theatre as he made quick sketches of performers from the lofty heights of the theatre’s Dress Circle or, as in the case of this print, from a worm’s eye view near the Orchestra’s Pit to see what I mean.

What Williams portrays here is most likely an actress in a stage production lightly touched by stage lights. Certainly this is not an everyday scene of a lady reacting to an engagement ring—not that I’m an expert on how everyday women react to engagement rings. Note, for instance, the lady’s grand gesture as she leans her head backwards with a slight turn to her face while delicately holding the ring at her fingertips away from her body. In short, the low angle of view, the strong lighting and the dramatic gesture of the figure are all a part of Williams’ viewpoint in a music hall ... and the need to be warm.




Unidentified artist working in the style of the Pre-Raphaelites
“Angel Study”, late 19th century (?)
Chalk on reddish-brown tinted paper
Framed with a simple natural/unvarnished wood edge and an ivory/cream archival mount under a Perspex/acrylic sheet
Size: (frame) 59.5 x 49 cm; (image) 28.5 x 21 cm

Condition: the drawing appears to be in very good condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds or foxing) based on examining it in its frame only. The frame is untreated natural wood with minor signs of age.


I am selling this framed magnificent drawing by an unidentified master in the manner of the Pre-Raphaelites for AU$550 AUD (currently US$395.18/EUR355,52/GBP270.26 at the time of posting this drawing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this stunning original drawing, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This very beautiful drawing is a mystery to me and the dealer from whom I purchased it with regard to who drew it and when it was executed. The drawing is clearly by a highly skilled, technically aware and sensitive artist. At a guess the drawing exhibits some of stylistic attributes (i.e. the choice of subject, medium and colour) of the Pre-Raphaelites. I am not proposing that this drawing was made by one of this brotherhood of artists—such an attribution is as likely as finding a Rembrandt in the attic—rather, I wish suggest that the drawing is by a follower/admirer of this group and executed around the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.







Charles Émile Jacque (1813–94)
“Paysage—troupeau de vaches” [Landscape— Herd of cows], 1849, printed by Auguste Delâtre (1822–1907) and published by Marchant (c.1830–80), Alliance des Arts, Rue de Rivoli, 140, Paris.

Etching on chine-collé on thick wove paper
Size: (sheet) 15.9 x 20.5 cm; (plate); 7 x 9.4 cm; (image) 5.9 x 8.6 cm
Inscribed in the plate with the artist’s signature (upper right corner)

Guiffrey 1866 146 (undescribed state); IFF 222
Guiffrey offers the following description of this print: “Un troupeau de vaches sort du bois, au milieu marche le vacher précédé de son chien & portant sous le bras une botte d'herbes. Un arbre droit & maigre se découpe sur le ciel clair du fond. 1849. Signé Ch. Jacque. Premier état Eau-forte pure. Deuxième état Traits de burin dans les terrains & sur le cou des trois vaches qui sont le plus à gauche. Troi- sième état Un fond de bois entoure l'arbre qui se détachait isolé sur le ciel jusqu'à moitié de sa hauteur.” [Google Translation: “A herd of cows out of the wood, walking in the middle of the cowherd preceded her dog & carrying under his arm a bundle of herbs. A law & skinny tree is silhouetted against the clear sky. 1849. Signed Ch. Jacque. First Etching pure state. Second chisel Traits state land & on the necks of three cows that are more to the left. A third condition of woods surrounding the tree that stood isolated on the sky to half its height.”]

Based on Guiffrey’s description, I propose that this print is from the third state (of four states?). Guiffrey does not mention the inscribed publisher’s address featured in the British Museum’s copy signifying that the BM's copy is the fourth state—unless the address is erased which would make this a fifth state.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Man and herd of cows walking out of a forest and going to the right; later impression of a plate executed in 1849”

Condition: richly inked and crisp impression with margins. There is are a few very faint spots otherwise in excellent condition (i.e. there are no signs of abrasion, tears or stains beyond the very faint spots which may be an integral part of the paper rather than a flaw).


I am selling this exquisite etching exemplifying the spirit of the Barbizon School of artist for AU$118 (currently US$84.78/EUR76.27/GBP57.98 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this original Jacque etching referencing the old masters, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


In 1848, a year before Jacque executed this etching, Jean-François Millet (1814–75) began to make his first etchings. I mention this seeming unrelated date as it was a watershed moment for both Jacque and Millet: for Millet, 1848 (Michel Melot suggests 1947) marked the beginning his explorations of etching through his appreciation (Melot suggests “imitation”) of Jacque’s prints; for Jacque the date marked a change from his former approach of rendering images with fine lines to the confident emphatic lines of his mature work. In short, 1848 signified a time when both artists were under the influence of each other in creating the powerful images—like this print—that exemplify the Barbizon movement.

Regarding this print, I can see the strong influence of Millet’s vision of the noble rural worker that underpinned Jacque’s prints after 1848. This shared vision is certainly evident in Jacque’s choice of subject for the etching—a weary farmer carrying a sheaf of wheat under his arm while leading a herd of cows from a forest into a clearing—but the shared vision is also evident in even small details like the treatment of the portrayed farmer. For example, compare the similarities between this figure and the farmer in Millet’s etching, “Le Paysan rentrant du Fumier” (1855) that I have posted previously.



Saturday, 28 May 2016


Utagawa Hiroshige (歌川 広重) aka Andō Hiroshige (安藤 広重) (1797 –1858)

“Yui, Satta-mine Oya-shirazu” 由井薩多嶺親志らず (Yui: Satta Peak, [The Coast of] Oya-shirazu), number 17 from the series, “Tokaido Gojusan Tsugi Meisho Dzuye” (五十三次名所圖會) [The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido] aka Tate-e Tokaido [Vertically formatted], published by Tsutaya Kichizō (Kōeidō), 1855

Colour woodblock print on fine paper
Size: (sheet) 35.8 x 23.7 cm
Inscribed in upper-right blue cartouche: “由井 / 薩多嶺 / 親志らず” [Yui: Satta Peak, (The Coast of) Oya-shirazu]; upper-right red cartouche: “五十三次名所圖會 十七” [The Fifty-Three Stations: Illustrations of Famous Places, No. 17]; lower-left cartouche “廣重筆” [Brush by Hiroshige]; lower-left seal “” [Seal of censorship]; marked with the publisher’s seal lower-left and dated [Year of the Cock, seventh month]. 

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Colour woodblock oban print. Travellers ascending long slope along costal cliff; ships in bay; Mt Fuji in distance. Inscribed, signed, sealed and marked.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=784767&partId=1&searchText=hiroshige+no+17&page=1)
See the full set of this series at J. Noel Chiappa’s online catalogue raisonné of Hiroshige’s prints at http://www.hiroshige.org.uk/hiroshige/tokaido_tate-e/tokaido_tate-e.htm  

Condition: a variant coloured impression (compare with the copy at the British Museum, see url above) with a central vertical crease and other weak areas reinforced (verso). There are imperfections in the printing process.


I am selling this original woodblock print by the legendary Hiroshige for a total cost of AU$240 (currently US$172.44/EUR155.13/GBP117.93 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this rare Hiroshige featuring Mt Fuji, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This original impression by Hiroshige is a variant from the colours that he used in the first edition impression that may be seen at the British Museum. Most noticeable is the colour change from a yellow sky to the glowing red/pink one. Although the remainder of the colours in this print are much the same as those exhibited in the BM copy, the change in the colour of the sky makes a significant difference—at least to me—in how the image is seen. What I mean is perhaps best summed up by the old seaman adage: “Red sky at night, a sailor’s delight; red sky in the morning, a sailor’s warning.” Essentially, for me, the red sky of this impression casts a foreboding spell over the scene.

Beyond this gloomy viewpoint, Timothy Clark in “100 Views of Mount Fuji” (London, BMP, 2001) offers the following interesting insights into this print: “Oya-shirazu (literally, 'forgetting a parent') is the name used to describe a treacherous coastline beaten by waves where there is not even time for 'a child to look back for a parent, or a parent to look back for a child'. Until the construction of the Satta Pass by the Shogunate in 1655, the route of the Tokaido had been along the rocky shoreline at low tide, here seen partially covered by the sea. … this composition … [takes] us up the long slope that leads to the high pass. The figures are of the stereotypical 'stick-leg' kind (it almost looks as if they are on stilts) of Hiroshige's later years. Compensatory interest is created by the use of unusual, even unnatural colours… . The line of the right slope of Mt Fuji has been deliberately fragmented to suggest that it is glimpsed through the trees.”





Hermann Burmeister (1807–92)
Mammal Skeleton Fossils: Plate X; Plate XIII; Plate XVI, 1882–5, from Hermann Burmeister’s et al., “Description physique de la République Argentine d'après des observations personelles et étrangères” published in 1876, Buenos Aires & Paris. (Note that the three parts of Section 2 featuring the prints of “Mammifères” were published from 1881 to 1886.)

Large-folio colour lithographs on thick wove paper
Size: (each sheet) 56 x 36 cm

Inscribed (upper left) with the folio number and name, “II Mammifè”; (upper right) with the plate number in Roman numerals; (lower left) the name of the artist/designer and the date of publication; (lower right) the name of the printer and city of publication. Each anatomical detail is also inscribed with a relevant figure number.

Condition: strong impressions with full margins (as published). The sheets show minor signs of use (i.e. lightly bumped edges and general dustiness) and Plate X—the sheet featuring the seal—is lined on the back with a fine conservator’s support sheet.


I am selling these three large and exceptionally beautiful original 19th century lithographs for AU$108 (currently US$77.60/EUR69.81/GBP53.07 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing these masterworks of illustration, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Burmeister’s choice to add colour to these large lithographs of mammal skeleton fossils, certainly gives “life” to old bones. Nevertheless, I wonder if the addition of colour is simply to make them eye-catchingly beautiful or whether there is a more scientifically robust reason. I would like to believe that the colour helps to clarify—in a genuinely objective way—the true local colour of the bones and the seal, but I guess that the reason really doesn’t matter. The “end-result” for these illustrations is what counts and, to my eyes, the touch of colour engages the eye and sustains interest.