Gallery of prints for sale

Sunday, 17 February 2019

Georges Bellenger’s lithograph, “The Triumph of Silenus”, c1862, after Théodore Géricault


Georges Bellenger (1847–1915)

“The Triumph of Silenus” (aka “The Procession of Silenus”) , c1862, after the chiaroscuro drawing in black chalk and white gouache on brown paper (c1816–17) in the Musée des Beaux-Arts d'Orléans by Théodore Géricault (aka Jean-Louis André Théodore Géricault) (1791–1824), published by Lemercier et Cie (fl.1827–1899) in Paris.

Lithograph in black and brown inks on thick wove paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 29.5 x 36.5 cm; (image borderline) 20.4 x 27.6 cm
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “GÉRICAULT DEL”; (centre) ‘Imp. Lemercier et Cie. Paris.”; (right) “G. BELLENGER LITH.”

Condition: crisp and well-printed impression with the only defect being a restored scratch at the lower right corner (virtually invisible) otherwise the print is in near pristine condition backed with a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this marvellous lithograph showing the very drunk and obese satyr, Silenus—the tutor/companion of the wine-god Dionysus and famous for the philosophical quip given to him by Plutarch: “the best thing for a man is not to be born, and if already born, to die as soon as possible”—weighing down a poor donkey. The total price for this richly glowing lithograph is AU$168 (currently US$120.03/EUR106.25/GBP93.07 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this beautiful original lithograph, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Saturday, 16 February 2019

Jan Luyken’s etching, “The Plague of Fiery Hail over Egypt”, 1708


Jan Luyken (aka Jan Luiken) (1649–1712)

“The Plague of Fiery Hail over Egypt” (aka “Plaag van hagel en onweer” [transl. “Plague of hail and thunder” (Rijksmuseum title)]; “De Plaag van Hagel en Vuur over Egipte” [title on plate]), 1708, published by Pieter Mortier I (1661–1711) as an illustration to “Icones Biblicae Veteris et Novi Testamenti”, in Amsterdam.

Etching on laid paper trimmed with small margins around the image borderline and the lettered publication details, and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 33.8 x 42.5 cm; (image borderline) 32.5 x 41.8 cm
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “P. Mortier. edit. cum Privileg.”; (centre) “De Plaag van Hagel en Vuur over Egipte. Exod. IX.” Note that the lettered reference, “Pag. 54.”, has been lost with restoration of the lower-right corner.
Lifetime impression.

Van Eeghen 3242/3705 (P van Eeghen 1905, “Het werk van Jan en Casper Luyken”, Amsterdam, Frederik Muller & Co., vol. 2, pp. 586 & 661, cat. nos. 3242 & 3705). Note that this publication is available for online viewing or free download at archive.org:

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(Google transl.) “View of a landscape where the storms, lightning and where people and animals are struck by huge hailstones. In the background the contours of a city. The print is a depiction of the seventh plague that God made over Egypt.”

Condition: near faultless, well-printed impression, trimmed with small margins and laid on a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. There is a replenished loss at the lower right corner, otherwise the sheet is in an excellent/near pristine condition.

I am selling this superb lifetime impression, for AU$193 (currently US$137.90/EUR122.07/GBP106.92 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this finely executed, large and graphically arresting scene featuring fiery hailstones—larger than cannonballs!—falling on distressed Egyptian folk and their animals (viz. horses, camels, oxen, sheep and at least one pig), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Friday, 15 February 2019

Dalziel Brothers’ wood-engraving, "Summer Snow", 1863


Wood-engravers: Dalziel Brothers (aka Camden Press; Dalziel and Co.) (1839–1905)
Designer: Edward Burne-Jones (1833–98)
“The Summer Snow”, 1863, illustration to Dora Greenwell’s poem, “Summer Snow”, published by Strahan & Co. (London and Edinburgh, 1863) in “Good Words for 1863” (opp. p. 380), after the design drawn (but not engraved) on the printing plate by Edward Burne-Jones.
__________

Extract from Greenwell’s poem:
“Once in a garden fair,
Huddling close their heads together,
Flowers were heard to whisper there,
‘Oh the changeful April weather!
Soft falls the summer snow,
On the springing grass drops light,
Not like that which long ago,
Fell so deadly cold and white;
This wears the Rose's flush,
Faint, ere bloom hath quite foregone her,
Soft as maiden's timid blush,
With the looks she loves upon her.’" (p. 380)
­­­­__________

Wood-engraving on wove paper with letterpress title, trimmed with small margins and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 16.4 x 12.2 cm; (image borderline) 14.6 x 10.7 cm
Signed on plate within the image borderline: (lower-left corner) “DALZIEL”.
Titled with letterpress text below the image borderline: “THE SUMMER SNOW.”

Amanda-Jane Doran (2017) offers excellent insights about this print:
Interestingly, Doran proposes that there is a possibility that Georgiana (Burne-Jones’ wife) may have been involved in the engraving of this plate.

This print is discussed in the Dalziel Brothers’ (viz. G & E Dalziel) 1901 publication, “The Brothers Dalziel: A Record of Fifty Years’ Work ...1840–1890”, Camden Town, Camden Press, p. 162. In this discussion, William Holman Hunt’s letter (1861) to Alexander Strahan regarding the choice of illustrators for “Good Words” proposes that Edward Burne-Jones “… is perhaps the most remarkable of all the younger men of the profession for talent”. Holman Hunt then advises that Burne-Jones: “… has yet, I think, made but few if any drawings on wood, but he has had much practice in working with the point both with pencil and pen and ink on paper, and so would have no difficulty with the material” (p. 162).

See also the description at the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne):

Condition: crisp and well printed impression on wove paper with small margins and laid on a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in an excellent/near pristine condition.

I am selling this famous wood engraving—in the sense that it is often reproduced with reference to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and features in the current exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia (Canberra), “Love and Desire: Pre-Raphaelite Masterpieces from the Tate”—for AU$130 (currently US$92.48/EUR82/GBP72.10 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this extraordinarily beautiful wood-engraving featuring “a portrait of Jane Morris in the early years of her marriage to the artist’s close friend and artistic collaborator, William Morris” (Doran [2017]), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Thursday, 14 February 2019

Jan Collaert II's engraving, “Hunter Caught in Pit”, c1596


Jan Collaert II (aka Hans Collaert; Jan Baptist I Collaert) (c1561–c1620)

“Hunter Caught in Pit” (aka “Inexperienced Hunter Attacked by Snakes” [BM title];  “Jager gevangen in kuil” [Rijksmuseum title]), c1596, from the series of 104 engraved plates of hunting scenes, “Venationes Ferarum, Avium, Piscium” (With wild beasts, birds, fish), after the design by Jan van der Straet (mostly known as Joannes Stradanus) (1523–1605), with text by Cornelis Kiliaan (1528–1607), published by Philips Galle (1537–1612) in Antwerp.

Engraving on laid paper trimmed with small margins around the image borderline at top and sides and retaining the text box, backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 19.9 x 27 cm; (image borderline) 18.3 x 26.7 cm
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left corner) “Ioan. Stradanus invent. / I. Collaert Sculp. Phls Galle exc.”.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline in two lines of Latin in two columns: “Sæpe quidem .../ …// …/ ..esca Colubris.”
Lifetime impression; state i (of iv) before numbering.

New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 1517.I (3) (The Collaert Dynasty); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 504.I (4) (Johannes Stradanus); Baroni Vannucci 1997 693.42 (Alessandra Baroni Vannucci 1997, “Jan van der Straet, detto Giovanni Stradano, flandrus pictor et inventor”, Milan, Jandi Sapi Editori)

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(transl.) “In a landscape hunted deer and rabbits. Near a few ruins a careless hunter has fallen into a pit with snakes. Although his friends try to pull him out of the pit with a rope, their attempts are too late. The man is bitten and strangled by snakes. The print has a Latin caption and is part of a series about hunting scenes.”
See also the description offered by the British Museum:
“Inexperienced Hunter Attacked by Snakes; in the centre foreground, a hunter is attacked by snakes in the vaults of a ruined building, which is seen beyond; above, three companions attempt to rescue him with a rope; in the left mid ground, a hunter on horseback chases a deer, while two hounds pursue a rabbit in the left foreground” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1620278&partId=1&people=128853&peoA=128853-2-60&page=1)

Regarding other plates in this series, see Alessandra Baroni & Manfred Sellink 2012, “Stradanus 1523–1605: Court Artist of the Medici", Turnhout, Brepols Publishers, pp.245–58, cat. nos. 32-49.

Condition: richly inked and well printed early impression trimmed with small margins around the image borderline (retaining the text box) and laid on a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. There are small losses and restorations (virtually invisible).

I am selling this curious scene of a hunter who has fallen into a subterranean chamber and is being bitten by leaping snakes as he is hauled up on a rope by rescuers for the total cost of AU$286 (currently US$189.08/EUR167.75/GBP147.69 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this alarming and amazing image created only 84 years after Michelangelo finished work on the Sistine Chapel, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print has been sold











Wednesday, 13 February 2019

Benigno Bossi’s etching, "Allegory of Art", c1770


Benigno Bossi (1727–1792)

"Allegory of Art", c1765–1776, plate 1 from the series, “Prove d’acquaforte” (Etching proofs), from the compendium of two suites of prints by Bossi, “Raccolta di teste, pensieri e prove d'acquaforte”, published in c1776 by Gioachino Bettalli and C Cont.a of Capello, in Parma.

Etching on laid paper.
Size: (sheet) 27 x 18.7 cm; (plate) 16.3 x 12.5 cm; (image borderline) 15.5 x 11.2 cm.
Inscribed somewhat indecipherably on plate within the image borderline: (lower right corner) “Be…[nigno?] Bos …[si?] In. …[fe?].”
Numbered on plate within the image borderline: (upper right corner) “1”.
See a brief description of this print held by the Moravian Gallery (Brno, Czech Republic): https://www.webumenia.sk/dielo/CZE:MG.C_174

Condition: richly inked and near faultless impression on laid paper with generous margins. There are minor signs of handling (i.e. light finger marks on lower edge of the margin and there is slight wrinkling to the edges of the sheet, otherwise the print is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this remarkable etching of two putti engaged in the art of creative invention—one of the children (in my interpretation of the image) is drawing the silhouette edge of the shadow cast by a classical sculpture as if referencing the famous myth of the “Maid of Corinth” who created the first drawing by tracing the shadow of her lover before he went to battle; the other child seems to be gazing into a bowl of paint as if looking into a crystal ball—for AU$220 (currently US$156.34/EUR138.48/GBP121.33 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exemplary visual representation of the art of creating art, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.