Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 24 May 2019

Philips Galle‘s engraving, “The Sons of God, Satan amongst Them, Present Themselves before Him”, 1563, after Maarten van Heemskerck


Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)

“The Sons of God [the Angels], Satan amongst Them, Present Themselves before Him” (TIB title) (aka “The Sons of God and Satan before God”) 1563, from the series of eight plates (TIB 5601.018:1–8), "The Story of Job" (aka “Geschiedenis van Job”), after the design of the intermediary draughtsman, Maarten van Heemskerck (1498–1574), with Latin text by Hadrianus Junius (aka Adriaen de Jonghe) (1511–1575), published by Philips Galle in Haarlem.

Note: the Curator of the British Museum advises that a related drawing by Heemskerck for this print is held by the Centraal Museum, Utrecht (inv. 11260) (see BM no. 1949,0709.113).

Engraving fine laid paper trimmed with narrow margins around the image borderline on the top, sides and below the text box, backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 20.9 x 25.2 cm; (image borderline) 19.7 x 24.9 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower centre) “MHEEM. IN. 2.”; (on cloud below God) “PG. F.”
Lettered on plate below the image borderline in two columns of two lines of Latin text: "ALIGERO ... PECTORA DIRIS".
State: i (of ii)

TIB 5601.018:2 (Walter L Strauss & Arno Dolders [eds.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, New York, Abaris Books, p. 74. cat. no. .018:2); New Hollstein Dutch 58-1(2) (Galle) (Manfred Sellink [comp. & ed.] 2001, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, Part 1, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision, p. 88, cat. no. 58); New Hollstein Dutch 162-1(2) (Heemskerck) (Ilja M Veldman 1993–94, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts 1450-1700: Maarten van Heemskerck”, Roosendaal, Koninklijke Van Poll, p. 140, cat. no. 162); Bartsch LVI.73-80.018:1-8.

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(transl.) “The heaven-dwellers and Satan make their appearance before God. God is holding a globe under his arm. God gives Satan permission to do what he wants with Job's property. Under the representation an explanatory text in Latin.”

See also the description offered by the Metropolitan Museum of Art
and the British Museum

Condition: crisp, well-printed impression, trimmed near the image borderline and retaining the text box at the lower edge. The sheet is in excellent condition and is laid onto a support of conservator’s fine archival/millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this superb lifetime impression of this rare engraving, executed only 22 years after Michelangelo completed “The Last Judgement”, for the total cost of AU$272 (currently US$187.82/EUR167.82/GBP147.98 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this fascinating print illustrating the moment when God gives Satan permission to test Job's virtue (see Job 1:6–12), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print is reserved pending confirmation of its purchase


For those interested in the portrayed scene the following New International Version (NIV) translation of the relevant passage from Job 1:6–12 may be useful:

6 One day the angels came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came with them.
7 The Lord said to Satan, ‘Where have you come from?’
Satan answered the Lord, ‘From roaming throughout the earth, going back and forth on it.’
8 Then the Lord said to Satan, ‘Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one on earth like him; he is blameless and upright, a man who fears God and shuns evil.’
9 ‘Does Job fear God for nothing?’ Satan replied.
10 ‘Have you not put a hedge around him and his household and everything he has? You have blessed the work of his hands, so that his flocks and herds are spread throughout the land.
11 But now stretch out your hand and strike everything he has, and he will surely curse you to your face.’
12 The Lord said to Satan, ‘Very well, then, everything he has is in your power, but on the man himself do not lay a finger.’
Then Satan went out from the presence of the Lord."










Thursday, 23 May 2019

Lucas Vorsterman's engraving, “Adoration of the Magi”, 1602, after Rubens


Lucas Vorsterman I (aka Lucas Aemilius Vorsterman) (1595–1675)

“Adoration of the Magi” (aka “Adoration with the Torches”), 1620, after Peter Paul Rubens’ (aka Petrus Paulus Rubenius) (1577–1640) painting in the Church of St John, Malines and the modello drawing in the Cabinet du Dessins, Musée du Louvre (Paris) with a Latin dedication by Rubens to Albert, Archduke of Austria, published by Lucas Vorsterman I in Antwerp. This is a later impression.

Note that there is a very close copy of Vorsterman’s engraving by Pieter Nolpe (1613/14–c1652/3) but this copy can be easily distinguished from Vorsterman’s print by the production detail, “Peter Nolpe fecit”, and the lighter tone of the keystone illuminated in the archway above the Holy Family (see Nolpe’s engraving at the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1631634&partId=1&searchText=vorsterman+adoration+&page=1).

Engraving on heavy wove paper, trimmed with small margins around the plate mark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 61.7 x 46.8 cm; (plate) 59.1 x 44.5 cm; (image borderline) 58 x 43.9 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline (left) “SERENISSIMO … CONSECRATOVE. / P.P.Rubens pinxit.”; (centre) “Cum priuilegÿs, Regis Christianissimi, Principum Belgarum, & Ordinum Batauiæ.”; (right) “Lucas Vorsterman sculp. et excud. An.1620."

Schneevoogt 1873 22.84 (C G Voorhelm Schneevoogt 1873, “Catalogue des estampes gravées d'après P.P.Rubens”, Haarlem, p. 22, cat. no. 84); Dutuit.VI.54.44 (Eugène Dutuit 1884, ”Manuel de l'amateur d'estampes”, Paris); Hollstein 8 (Christiaan Schuckman [comp.] & D. de Hoop Scheffer [ed.] 1993, “Hollstein's Dutch & Flemish Etchings, Engravings & Woodcuts, 1450–1700: Lucas Vorsterman I”, vol. 43, Amsterdam, p. 16, cat.no. 8).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Adoration of the Magi; the Holy Family at right; the Christ child delves His hand into a vessel offered by one of the reverential Magi; the turbaned magi holds open a precious casket and the other holds a censer; behind them a crowd of figures strain for a better view; in the background by some columns two figures bear torches; after Peter Paul Rubens. 1620 Engraving”

See also the description at the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: well-printed faultless but slightly dull later impression with small margins and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in museum quality/near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or significant signs of use).

I am selling this very large engraved masterwork by one of the most famous and accomplished printmakers who collaborated with Rubens (until they had an major argument and parted), for AU$525 (currently US$360.87/EUR323.52/GBP285.28 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this major engraving of the Baroque period, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Wednesday, 22 May 2019

Giovanni Buonafede's engraving, "La Madonna Della Seggiola”, c1840, after Raphael


Giovanni Buonafede (aka Giovanni Bonafeddo) (1816–?)

“La Madonna Della Seggiola”, c1840, after Raphael’s (1483–1520) painting in the ‎Palazzo Pitti (Florence), published by Calcografia Romano (aka Camera Apostolica; Calcografia Camerale; Regia Calcografia; Calcografia Nazionale; Calcographia RCA) (1738–1870) in Rome.

Engraving with etching on heavy wove paper with small margins and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 44.1 x 36.3 cm; (image borderline) 32.2 x 32.2 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Raffaele Sanzio dip.“; (centre) “LA MADONNA DELLA SEGGIOLA / Roma presso La Calcografia Camerale”; (right) “Giov. Buonafede inc“.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The Virgin and Child with the Baptist in a tondo, after Raphael; lettered state Engraving”

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression, trimmed with small margins around a soft platemark impression. There is a strong fold at the upper edge of the sheet following the platemark and there is a hole at the lower right corner with a small retouched restoration otherwise the sheet is in very good condition and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this large engraved masterwork, exemplifying Buonafede’s skill in translating the colours, tones and textures of Raphael’s famous painting, for AU$225 (currently US$155.12/EUR138.82/GBP122.41 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exquisite example of nineteenth century mastery of reproductive engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Tuesday, 21 May 2019

Gerard Gauw's engraving of calligraphy, "Plate17" (1605), after Jan van de Velde I



Gerard Gauw (aka Gerrit Adriaensz. Gauw) (c1580–1638) after
Jan van de Velde I (1569–1623)

“Plate 17”, 1605, from the model book of 52 engraved plates of calligraphy (including the title and finis plates), “Deliciae variarum insigniumque scripturarum” (Delights of Various and Distinguished Scripts) published in 1649 by Willem Jansz. Blaeu (1571–1638) in Haarlem.

This publication and a description of its details may be view online or downloaded free-of-charge from Archive.org:

Details of this publication are also available from Hathi Trust:

Christie’s Auctions give many insights about this publication and advise that this is the “earliest and perhaps the rarest of Van den Velde's half-dozen writing books”; see:

Engraving on fine laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 14.9 x 18.5 cm; (plate) 10.5 x 15.7 cm.
Inscribed on plate with seven lines of cursive Italian text with flourishes and signed below the text: “Velde”
Numbered on plate at lower left corner: “17”.

Condition: a superb, richly inked and near faultless impression in museum quality/almost pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use). The very fine sheet is laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this small, rare and important masterpiece from the Dutch Golden Age, designed as a model for calligraphy students to copy, for AU$390 (currently US$268.17/EUR240.50/GBP211.19 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this supreme example of early calligraphy with serpentine flourishes on cursive Italian script, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Monday, 20 May 2019

Enea Vico's engraving, “Statue of Hermaphroditus in a Niche”, 1552


Enea Vico (1523–1567) according to the British Museum and the Museum Boijmans or an anonymous artist as proposed by the Rijksmuseum.

“Statue of Hermaphroditus in a Niche” (descriptive title only) (aka “Hermaphroditos”), 1552, after Marcantonio Raimondi’s (1470/1482–1527/1534) engraving, “Apollo” and its repetition in reverse (TIB 26[14].332[250] & 333[251]), after a sculpture that was once in the collection of the Palazzo Farnese (as inscribed on plate), from the series, “'Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae” (Mirror of Roman Splendour), published by Antoine Lafréry (aka Antonio Lafreri) (1512–1577) in Rome.

The Rijksmuseum offers the following insights into the series “Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae”, in which this print features:
(transl.) “This corpus, consisting of prints with representations of works of art and buildings from ancient and modern Rome, originated from publishers Antonio Salamanca and Antonio Lafreri. These two foreign publishers joined forces in Rome in the period 1553-1563. Their prints quickly became extremely popular with tourists and collectors, who purchased the prints individually or in large groups. Large groups of Speculum prints were often bound together in albums upon request. There are several Speculum albums that are all different in content. Between 1573 and 1577 Antonio Lafreri published a special title page (with the title 'Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae') that people could add to their collections. The death of Lafreri in 1577 did not mean the end of the corpus. A large part of the copper plates passed to Claudio and Stefano Duchetti. The rest was spread over various other publishers. The popularity of the Speculum prints managed to inspire publishers for a long time to have copies made and to add new prints to the corpus.” (RP-P-H-H-925)

Engraving on fine laid paper trimmed unevenly along the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 33.5 x 21.4 cm.
Inscribed on plate on pedestal base cartouche: “HERMAPHRODITI STATVA .../ … PALLATIO FARNESIANO COLLOCATA / ANT LAFRERII FORMISS ROMAE MDLII.”

Huelsen 56–A (Christian Huelsen 1921, “Das Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae des Antonio Lafreri”); Rubach 320 (Birte Rubach 2016, “Ant. Lafreri Formis Romae: Der Verleger Antonio Lafreri und seine Druckgraphikproduktion”, Berlin, Lukas Verlag, p. 415).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Statue of a youth identified as Hermaphroditos by the inscription, standing in contrapposto within a niche, right hand raised above head, left hand resting on a support. 1552 Engraving”

See also the description of this print offered by Museum Boijmans:

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum that attributes this print to an anonymous artist:
“Image of a male nude with an arm above the head. In the inscription, this figure is interpreted as Hermaphroditus, but the figure is also very similar to the Apollo Lyceus type.”

Condition: well-printed crisp impression in a generally clean condition, trimmed along the image borderline with replenished losses and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this Renaissance period engraving dated on the plate, “MDLII” (1552)—most likely a lifetime impression based on the crisp quality of the lines showing no sign of wear to the printing plate—for AU$412 (currently US$284.73/EUR255.14/GBP223.65 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this rare and (to my eyes) a curiously exciting print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold