Gallery of prints for sale

Monday, 5 December 2022

Thomas Landseer’s soft-ground etching, “Hand and Wrist of ‘Duncan’”, 1817, after Benjamin Robert Haydon

Thomas Landseer (1795–1880)

“Hand and Wrist of ‘Duncan’”, 1817, from a series of seven soft-ground etchings after Benjamin Robert Haydon (1786–1846), published in 1817 by Thomas Landseer in “Haydon's drawing-book”. See this etching and another plate showing two hands described by the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1866-1013-420-420-. Although I may be wrong, the subject possibly relates to Hadon’s studies for “The Murder of Duncan – Macbeth Stabbing Duncan” (see https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:28274).

Soft-ground etching on chine collé on wove paper, trimmed with a small margin around the platemark and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (support sheet) 34.2 x 44 cm; (sheet) 17.8 x 30.5 cm; (plate) 15.2 x 28 cm; (chine collé) 15 x 28 cm.

Lettered in plate along the lower edge: (left) “DUNCAN/ B. R. Haydon. delt.”; (centre) “Pub. May 1. 1817 by T. Landseer 33 Foley Str: London.”; (right) “T. Landseer Sct

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression, trimmed around the platemark and laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper providing wide margins. Beyond slightly dusty margins to the original sheet, the sheet is in a good condition with no tears, holes, folds, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this simply magnificent study of a hand executed as a soft-ground etching, for the total cost of AU$237 (currently US$161.32/EUR153.08/GBP131.31 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally fine hand study, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Saturday, 3 December 2022

Albrecht Dürer’s engraving, “The Virgin and Child with a Monkey”, c1498


Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528)

“The Virgin and Child with a Monkey”, c1498, a 19th century impression from the original plate.

Engraving (19th century impression) on buff wove paper.

Size: (sheet) 21.3 x 15.4 cm; (plate) 18.9 x 12.3 cm.

Inscribed in plate with the artist’s monogram at lower centre: “AD”.

State i (of i) Late impression.

TIB 1001.042 (Walter L. Strauss [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Sixteenth Century German Artists: Albrecht Dürer”, vol. 10 [Commentary], New York, Abaris Books, pp.99–102, cat. no. [1001].042 [B.42(60)]); Meder 30 (Joseph Meder 1932, “Dürer-Katalog: Ein Handbuch über Albrecht Dürers Stiche, Radierungen, Holzschnitte, deren Zustände, Ausgaben und Wasserzeichen”, Vienna, cat. no. 30); Hollstein 30 (F.W.H Hollstein 1954–, “German Engravings, Etchings and Woodcuts, c1400–1700”, vol. VII, Amsterdam, M. Hertzberger, cat. no. 30); Schoch, Mende, and Scherbaum 20 (Rainer Schoch, Matthias Mende, Anna Scherbaum 2001–04, “Albrecht Dürer, Das druckgraphische Werk”, vol. 1, Munich, Prestel cat. no. 20).

The Cleveland Museum of Art offers the following insightful description of this print: “Like his earliest engraving of the subject, Dürer portrayed the Madonna and Child within an enclosed garden. In addition to the garden, which refers to Mary’s virginity, the artist included other elements that reference each figure’s religious significance. The bird held by the Christ Child represents the souls that will be saved by his sacrifice while the chained monkey, a symbol of lust and greed, is tamed under the Madonna’s influence, thus reinforcing her purity and virtue. Done only a few years later than his Holy Family with Butterfly, the difference in the sculptural modelling of the figures and the skilful handling of the background show Dürer’s quick development as an engraver as well as the impact of his first visit to Italy in 1495-96” (https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1964.29).

See also descriptions of this print offered by the Metropolitan Museum of Art; British Museum and Rijksmuseum: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/391053; https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_E-4-68; http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.33142.

Condition: a strong (late) impression showing very little wear to the printing plate with small margins. The sheet is in a near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains, foxing or signs of handling.

I am selling this original impression of one of Albrecht Dürer’s most famous engravings—note that it is not one of the fifteen copies made after Dürer’s design (see TIB101.042 C1–C15, vol 10 [Com.] pp.99–102)—taken from Dürer’s original plate in the 19th century, for the total cost of AU$3000 (currently US$2038.46/EUR1935.72/GBP1657.80 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally rare masterwork of engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.












Friday, 2 December 2022

Christoffel Jegher’s colour woodcut, “Portrait of Julian”, c1645

Christoffel Jegher (1596–1652/3)

“Portrait of Julian” (331/332–363) (aka Flavius Claudius Julianus; Julian the Apostate; Julian II), c1645, plate LXXIV (74) chiaroscuro woodcut illustration to page 149 of Hubert Goltzius' (1526–1583) “Icones Imperatorum Romanorum”, published in Antwerp by Balthasar Moretus II (aka Balthasar Moerentorf II) (1615–1674) in 1645.

Colour woodcut from two blocks printed in black and ochre on buff laid paper with letterpress text verso.

Size: (sheet) 20.5 x 20.1 cm; (image borderline dia.) 16.9 cm.

Lettered in plate following the round image borderline: “DN. FL. CL. IVLIANVS. P. F. AVG.”

The British Museum offers a description of this print: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1982-U-2959.

Condition: a strong impression with Latin letterpress text verso. Beyond unevenness to the ochre colour at upper left and a few dot stains in the lower right margin, the sheet is in an excellent condition for its considerable age with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this lifetime impression of a graphically arresting chiaroscuro woodcut from the mid-1600s for the total cost of AU$262 (currently US$178.06/EUR169.09/GBP144.81 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this marvellously strong colour woodcut depicting Julian II who was Caesar of Rome from 355 to 361 and ultimately Emperor from 361 to 363, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 









Adolphe Mouilleron’s (folly) lithograph, “Charles V Picking up Titian’s Brush”, c1843, after Robert-Fleury

Adolphe Mouilleron (1820–1881)

A printer’s folly lithograph printed by Victor Jacques Bertauts (fl.1830s–1880)—a unique proof of superimposed mirror impressions— “Charles V Picking up Titian’s Brush” (“Charles Quint ramassant le pinceau du Titien”), c1843, after Joseph Nicolas Robert-Fleury’s (1797–1890) painting exhibited in the Salon of 1843. The published version of this lithograph (without the superimposition) is from the series, “Album of the Salon of 1843”, showing the main works exhibited at the Louvre, published in 1843 by Pierre Joseph Challamel (aka Challamel & Cie) (1813–1849?) in Paris.

Note that there is a caricature lithograph of the same subject lettered with the title: “Le Titien mérite bien d'être servi par César, même quand César est abymé de rhumatisme” (Titian well deserves to be served by Caesar, even when Caesar is damaged by rheumatism).

Superimposed two reversed impressions of a crayon-manner lithograph on wove paper trimmed around the (superimposed) image borderline and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (support sheet) 43 x 30 cm; (image borderline) 25.5 x 14.1 cm.

Condition: a well-printed (folly) impression trimmed around the image borderline and laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper providing wide margins.

I am selling this playfully composed “folly” lithograph showing mirror images of King Charles V picking up Titian’s dropped paint brush—a sign of the King’s respect for the great painter even though the King was suffering rheumatism—for the total cost of AU$208 (currently US$141.82/EUR134.66/GBP115.53 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this curiously wonderful and unique lithograph, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Wednesday, 30 November 2022

Théophile Alexandre Steinlen’s lithograph, “Les Soliloques du Pauvre”

Théophile Alexandre Steinlen (1859–1923)

Les Soliloques du Pauvre” (The Soliloquies of the Poor), 1895, proof impression of the cover to Jehan Rictus’ (aka Gabriel Randon) (1867–1933) poems, “Les Soliloques du Pauvre”, published by the Société du "Mercure de France" in Paris in 1897 (see https://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb312150546).

I understand that the advancing figure on the right of the composition is the poet, Jenan Rictus—based on the Bibliothèque nationale’s advice that Rictus (transl.) “was a great friend of Steinlen who took inspiration from his silhouette to illustrate the most famous of his works: ‘The Soliloques of the Poor’” (see cat. no. 13: https://archive.org/details/bnf-bpt6k65340400/page/n22/mode/1up).

Éditions Gallimard offers the following insightful account of Jehan Rictus and this publication: (transl.) “Gabriel Randon, known as Jehan-Rictus … had a difficult and conflicted childhood, he left school around fourteen, lived in various small jobs and began to frequent the milieu of artists and anarchists in Montmartre. Leading a precarious life, homeless for a while, at twenty-two he frequented the world of tramps and vagabonds, a crucial experience that would inspire him with the best of his literary work. He was twenty-eight when he undertook to give voice to the little people of the streets and the declassed in poems entirely written in his language, Parisian slang. It will be The Soliloquies of the Poor which he made known by saying them himself in the Montmartre cabarets, notably at the Chat Noir. Unclassifiable book, without equivalent in the history of poetry, this collection which knows an immediate success because of its lyrical force, its oratorical power and its prosodic control is undoubtedly, after Villon and before Prévert or Queneau, one of rare examples of a poetry that uses popular language and in a certain way prefigures contemporary rap” (https://www.gallimard.fr/Catalogue/GALLIMARD/Poesie-Gallimard/Les-soliloques-du-pauvre-suivi-de-Le-coeur-populaire#).

Transfer lithograph printed in black on cream wove paper (see https://emuseum.mfah.org/objects/2826/les-soliloques-du-pauvre).

Size: (sheet) 28 x 38 cm; (image borderline) 20 x 32.3 cm.

Lettered in plate: “Jehan Rictus/ Les Soliloques/ DuPauvre/ Dessins De/ Steinlen”.

Crauzat 579 (Ernest de Crauzat 1913, “L'oeuvre gravé et lithographié de Steinlen”, Paris Société de propagation des livres d'art, p. 156, cat. no. 579 [see https://archive.org/details/loeuvregravetl00crauuoft/page/156/mode/1up]).

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression in a near pristine condition with no tears, holes, abrasions, stains or foxing.

I am selling this proof impression of Steinlen’s famous lithograph designed for the cover of his friend’s book of poems, for the total cost of AU$242 (currently US$164.68/EUR157.77/GBP136.20 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this graphically strong original lithograph capturing a bleak view of Parisian life in Montmartre towards the end of the nineteenth century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold









Anthonie Waterloo’s etching, “Traveller Near a Wood”, c1645

Anthonie Waterloo (aka Anthoni Waterloo; Antoni Waterlo) (1609–1690)

“Traveller Near a Wood” (aka “Man with a Dog in a Forest”), c1645 ([Rijksmuseum dates] 1630–1663; [final reworked state] 1868), from the series “Six Landscapes” (H.53-58). This impression was published in 1868 by Philip Gilbert Hamerton (1834–1894) in London as plate v (opposite page 282) in “Etching & Etchers” (1868).

Etching on laid paper (partial watermark) with full margins as published.

Size: (sheet) 16.9 x 25.1 cm; (plate) 11.5 x 14.3 cm; (image borderline) 11.2 x 14.1 cm.

Inscribed in plate: (lower right): “AW F”

State iii (of iii) with “Cross-hatching added on the trunk of the tree at the center, just below the foliage. Heavy cross-hatching added in the dark area at the lower left” (Morse [1992], p. 61).

TIB 0201.053 S3 (Peter Morse [ed.] 1992, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Antoni Waterloo”, vol. 2, Commentary, Part 1, New York, Abaris Books, p.61, cat. no. 053 S3); Hollstein Dutch 53 (3) (Christiaan Schuckman 1997, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Antoni Waterloo,” vol. 50, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision, p. 126, cat. no. 53).

The British Museum and Rijksmuseum offer the following descriptions of this print: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_F-3-61;  http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.193724.

Condition: a richly inked impression—note retroussage marks around the figure and dog—with full margins and red edging to the sheet (as published) in a near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this superb impression from the Hamerton edition of 1868—interesting to note the nineteenth century desire to add richness to an impression like this by the use of retroussage (i.e., a technique employed when wiping the still wet plate to allow ink to “spill” over the lines)—for the total cost of AU$298 (currently US$200/EUR193.20/GBP167.07 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this very beautiful etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.