Gallery of prints for sale

Tuesday, 4 August 2020

Anthonie Waterloo’s etching, “The Chapel with Steps,” c1650



Anthonie Waterloo (aka Antoni Waterlo) (1609–90)

“The Chapel with Steps” (aka “La Chapelle Avec L’Escalier”), c1650 (1630–1663), plate five from the series, “Six landscapes” (aka “Hilly Landscapes”; “Heuvellandschappen”) (H.47–52), from the François Basan (1723–1797) edition of “Eighty-Eight Landscapes of Different Sizes” printed on forty-nine sheets published in 1776–77.

Etching on laid paper with a small margin around the platemark and laid onto a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 17.2 x 18.3 cm; (plate) 12.6 x 15 cm.

Inscribed on plate at upper-left: “Antoni Waterlo in. et ex.”

State ii (of ii) with the addition of what Morse (TIB 1992) describes as “Heavy cross-hatching added on the end of the rock at the curve of the path directly below the white house” (p. 58).

TIB 0201.051 S2 (Peter Morse [ed.] 1992, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Antoni Waterloo”, vol. 2, Part 1, Commentary, New York, Abaris Books, p. 58, cat. no. .051 S2; see also vol. 2, p. 42, cat. no. 51 [58]); Hollstein 51–2 (Christiaan Schuckman [comp.] 1997, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts c.1450–1700: Antoni Waterloo”, vol. 50, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision Rijksprentenkabinet, p. 122, cat. no. 51); Bartsch II.58.51 (Adam Bartsch 1803, “Le Peintre Graveur”, 21 vols, Vienna).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“The chapel; at far left; a road leading past it and the river at right; a man crossing a bridge in middle distance, next to the tall tree growing on a mount at centre; from a series of six landscapes. Etching”

(https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_F-3-57).

See also the descriptions of this print offered by the Detroit Institute of Arts Museum and the Rijksmuseum:

https://www.dia.org/art/collection/object/chapel-steps-64557;

http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.193719.

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression with a small margin around the platemark and laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in excellent condition for its considerable age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, losses, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this very beautiful and luminous etching executed with great sensitivity—note, for example, how the artist uses small curved strokes in the sky to the left of the centre tree’s dead limbs that help to integrate sky and tree with a subtle rhythmic flow (compare Waterloo’s treatment of this area of sky with the same area in the copyist/monogrammist LL’s version: http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.193720)—for the total cost of AU$293 (currently US$208.99/EUR177.68/GBP160.48 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this complexly interesting landscape by one of the most famous autodidact artists of the 17th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Monday, 3 August 2020

Théophile Chauvel’s etching, “Solitude”, 1862


Théophile Chauvel (aka Théophile-Narcisse Chauvel) (1831–c1914)

“Solitude,” 1862, Plate 41 from sixty etchings featured in the first year (September 1862–August 1863) and first volume of prints produced by the Société des Aquafortistes, “Eaux-Fortes Modernes: Originales et Inédites” (Modern Etchings: Original and New), printed by Auguste Delâtre (aka Auguste Marie Delâtre) (1822–1907) and published by A. Cadart & F. Chevalier (fl.1861–1863) and A. Cadart & Luquet (fl.1863–1867) in May 1863 in Paris.

Etching on watermarked laid paper with the blindstamp of the publisher and printed with full margins (as published).
Size: (sheet) 35.7 x 53 cm; (plate) 23.5 x 31.4 cm; (image borderline) 21.2 x 25.9 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left corner) “T. Chauvel 62”.
Numbered on plate above the image borderline: (upper right corner) “41.”
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) T. Chauvel pinxt. & sculpt.”; (centre) “SOLITUDE./ Paris, Publié par A. CADART & F. CHEVALIER, Éditeurs, Rue Richelieu, 66.”; (right) Imp. Delâtre, Rue St. Jacques, 303, Paris.”
Blindstamped below the platemark: (centre) “A CADART & LUQUET/ EDITEURS/ 66 R.[UE] RICHELIEU”.

IFF 5 (Inventaire du Fonds Français: Bibliothèque Nationale, Département des Estampes).
The British Museum, National Gallery of Australia and the Harvard Art Museums offer descriptions of this print:

Condition: richly inked and faultless impression with generously wide margins. The sheet is in near pristine condition for its age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this large etching exemplifying the Romantic spirit of nineteenth-century France for AU$228 in total (currently US$162.53/EUR137.93/GBP123.98 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail [EMS] postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in acquiring this graphically strong etching with its subtle reference to the great landscape tradition dating back to Poussin in the placement of a figure dwarfed by the surrounding forest, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Sunday, 2 August 2020

Jean Louis Charbonnel’s etching, “Nude Girl Crying in a Landscape”, 1873


Jean Louis Charbonnel (1854–1885)

“Nude Girl Crying in a Landscape” (descriptive title only), 1873, proof impression from a suite of five etchings that I understand (from advice from the dealer from whom I purchased this print, but I am unable to confirm if the following information is correct) are loosely based around the Auvergne region (central France) and were to feature as illustrations for “Album du Journal Paris a l'Eau Forte Pour 1875”, published by Richard Lesclide (1825–1892) and printed by Charles Delâtre (fl.c1872–1876) (see https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/334979).

Etching on fine wove paper (China) trimmed close to the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 12.9 x 5.5 cm; (image borderline) 12.3 x 4.9 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (lower left) “J. C.”

Condition: near faultless delicate impression trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderline. The sheet is in pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or blemishes), but, as the sheet is tissue thin, it has been laid onto a conservator’s support sheet.

I am selling this exceptionally sensitive etching for AU$186 in total (currently US$132.90/EUR112.85/GBP101.58 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in acquiring this delicate etching exemplifying the Romantic leanings of artists in France at the time, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Saturday, 1 August 2020

Alfred Robaut’s lithograph, “Jacob Wrestling with the Angel,” 1864, after Eugène Delacroix


Alfred Robaut (1830–1909)

“Jacob Wrestling with the Angel,” 1864, published in Paris by Dusacq & Cie (fl.c1864–1869) after Eugène Delacroix’s (aka Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix) (1798–1863) 1850 chalk on tracing paper  study (see https://www.themorgan.org/drawings/item/109711) for Delacroix’s oil and wax on plaster, “Jacob Wrestling with the Angel,” completed in 1861, in the Saints-Anges' chapel of the Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris.

Lithograph (possibly a transfer lithograph [autographie]) printed in black ink on ochre coloured chine collé (China) paper laid onto a support sheet after the removal from the original (but damaged) backing sheet. Note that Alfred Robaut encouraged artists such as Delacroix and Corot to use the transfer process of lithography, as this technique gave artists the freedom to draw on paper that could later be transferred to lithographic stones, rather than the artists having to work directly on problematically heavy limestone plates.

Size: (irregular sheet) 55.8 x 37.9 cm.
The Rijksmuseum offers a description of this print:

Ashley Dunn, Assistant Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints at the Met offers the following description of the Delacroix’s design underpinning this lithograph:
“In Delacroix's design, Jacob and the angel appear in the shallow foreground locked in combat at lower left. A grove of tall trees rises dramatically behind them; the thick, overlapping trunks echo their intertwined bodies. Through a clearing on the lower right, a cluster of figures suggests the flock of sheep and caravan that Jacob accompanied before his encounter with the angel”

For those unfamiliar with the subject portrayed in this lithograph, the following account of Genesis (32:22–28) may be helpful:
“That night Jacob got up and took his two wives, his two female servants and his eleven sons and crossed the ford of the Jabbok. After he had sent them across the stream, he sent over all his possessions. So Jacob was left alone, and a man wrestled with him till daybreak. When the man saw that he could not overpower him, he touched the socket of Jacob’s hip so that his hip was wrenched as he wrestled with the man. Then the man said, “Let me go, for it is daybreak.” But Jacob replied, “I will not let you go unless you bless me.” The man asked him, “What is your name?” “Jacob,” he answered. Then the man said, “Your name will no longer be Jacob, but Israel, because you have struggled with God and with humans and have overcome.”

Condition: very good impression but with many small restorations (e.g. there is watercolour infilling along a break in the centrefold and other hairline fractures) and the whole tissue-thin sheet has been removed from its damaged original support sheet and is relined with a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this graphically impressive and very large lithograph of Delacroix’s chalk study of one of his most famous compositions, for AU$292 in total (currently US$1208.63/EUR177.17/GBP159.46 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this rare lithograph—so rare that I have found only a single copy of it in any of the major museum repositories (viz. the Rijksmuseum)!—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Friday, 31 July 2020

Joseph Parrocel’s etching, “Jesus Heals the Sick by Laying His Hands on Them,” 1661


Joseph Parrocel (1646–1704)

“Jesus Heals the Sick by Laying His Hands on Them” (aka “Jesus Christ guerit plusieurs malades, imposant les mains sur chacun d'eux” [Robert-Dumesnil title), 1661, plate 19 from the series of forty plates, “Les Miracles de la Vie de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ” (The Miracles of the Life of Our Lord Jesus Christ).

Etching on laid paper trimmed within the plate mark (with partial loss of the lower right biblical reference) and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 15.6 x 118.3 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline along the lower edge: (left) “J. Parrossel. jn. et fe. C.P.R”
Inscribed on plate below the image borderline: (centre) “guerit plusieurs maladies, imposant les mains fur chacun” (cures several illnesses, laying hands on everyone); (lower right corner and partially trimmed) “St Luc Ch. 4”.

State i (of ii) lifetime impression of the etched state of the plate before it was later engraved in the second state (see discussion further below).

Robert-Dumesnil in the catalogue raisonné for this set of prints advises that the first state impressions of “pure etching” are “rare.”
Arguably, this impression is very likely to have been printed by the artist’s own hand as the inventory of his possession (dated 16 July, 1704) reveals that the artist possessed in the cellar of his house a “press in oak wood” to print his plates.

Robert-Dumesnil 1838 59 (19) (A P F Robert-Dumesnil 1838, “Le Peintre-Graveur Français,” vol. 3, Paris, p. 275, cat. no. 59 [19]: see https://archive.org/details/bnf-bpt6k65575384/page/n289/mode/2up).

Robert-Dumesnil in the catalogue raisonné (1838) offers the following description of this print:
(Transl.) “Our Lord is standing on a staircase, in the middle of the back, from where he works this miracle on a crowd of sick people stretched out in the foreground and in the background” (p. 266).

Condition: a superb, richly inked and well-printed impression of the utmost rarity—I have been unable to locate another copy of this print in any of the major museum repositories (including the Louvre)—trimmed within the platemark with partial loss of the biblical reference (St. Luke Ch. 4) and backed with a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this first state etching before it was later “finished” with engraving, for AU$235 in total (currently US$168.86/EUR142.53/GBP128.36 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally rare old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold