Gallery of prints for sale

Monday, 19 April 2021

Charles Eugène Delacommune’s charcoal drawing, “Orsay, Vallée de Chevreuse”, 1884

Charles Eugène Delacommune (1845–1905)

Orsay, Vallée de Chevreuse”, 1884, a charcoal drawing signed and dated on watermarked (“MICHALLET”) Michallet cream laid paper—the same beautiful paper manufactured in the second half of the 19th century in France with its distinctive weave of parallel ridges used by Georges Seurat for his conté crayon drawings which allowed even the darkest shadow to glow and “breathe” with the paper’s texture.

Regarding the portrayed scene, I understand that its geographical location is in the southwestern suburbs of Paris, approximately 20–25 km from the centre of Paris. (My apologies if I am not correct about this). I suspect that the scene is drawn on location as the measurement of the reflections of the mountain and distant building in the stream are accurate … of course the drawing may also have been executed in the studio and if it were, I propose that the artist is well-trained about the technical aspects of perspective.

Regarding the charcoal, the intensity of the black and the lack of smudging—mindful that smudging is an expected outcome of vine charcoal caused by the loose attachment of fine charcoal dust/powder to the sized paper—suggests to my eyes that this drawing may have been executed with oiled charcoal—a drawing medium produced from saturating vine charcoal with oil—which was popular in life classes at the time. Interestingly, only advanced students tended to use this almost dust-free medium capable of strong blacks (like today’s compressed charcoal) as it did not allow for the usual revisions to a drawing unlike vine charcoal.

Size: (sheet) 37.4 x 28.7 cm.

Condition: the sheet is in very good condition for its considerable age (dated 1848) with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant smudges, stains or foxing. There are remnants of previous mounting verso.

I am selling this exceptionally beautiful, signed and dated charcoal drawing, executed on the same watermarked paper (Michallet) used by Georges Seurat for his conte crayon drawings, for AU$288 (currently US$222.71/EUR186.14/GBP160.79 at the time of posting this drawing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this very French and very romantic drawing showcasing the late 19th century spirit for drawing on location rather than in the studio, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.












Sunday, 18 April 2021

James McNeill Whistler’s lithograph, “Stéphane Mallarmé”, 1892

James McNeill Whistler (aka James Abbott McNeill Whistler) (1834–1903)

Stéphane Mallarmé”—French Symbolist poet (1842–1898), 1892, printed by Ch Wittmann (fl1891–1907) in Paris—(later 1894 impressions were printed by Henri Belfond (1834–1903) (see http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.42629)—signed in the stone with the artist’s butterfly monogram, published in "Vers et Prose" by Perrin et Cie (Imprimerie Deslis Frères) in Paris, 1893.

Maggs Bros. Ltd offers the following interesting exchanges between Mallarmé and Whistler regarding this print and an excellent description of it:

“Mallarmé writing to Whistler in November 1892, ’this portrait is a marvel, the best thing that’s ever been done of me, and I am delighted with it’ (5 Nov. 1892). The artist himself later wrote that ’it is very beautiful - and as a portrait of the poet extraordinary’ (Whistler’s letter to T. Way, 15 Oct. 1894)” (https://www.maggs.com/vers-et-prose-morceaux-choisis-avec-un-portrait-par-james-mn-whistler_228494.htm).

Transfer lithograph on cream chine collé on heavy wove paper backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 17.2 x 10.9 cm; (chine collé) 11.5 x 8.7 cm.

Inscribed on plate: (lower right) [artist’s butterfly monogram]; (lower edge at centre) “Imp Ch. Wittmann”.

State i (of i)

Levy 101 (“The Lithographs of James McNeill Whistler”, first published in 1998—note that this two-volume catalogue raisonné is available for online viewing at the Art Institute of Chicago: https://www.artic.edu/digital-publications/33/the-lithographs-of-james-mcneill-whistler-the-digital-edition).

The Art Institute of Chicago offers a description of this print and the following insight about Whistler and Stéphane Mallarmé:

“Introduced by Claude Monet, the poet Mallarmé and Whistler became friends in 1887 and remained close until Mallarmé’s death in 1898. Each man played a role in the other’s publishing projects; Mallarmé translated the “Ten O’Clock” lecture into French, and Whistler produced this lithographic portrait for Mallarmé’s 1893 book of poems, Vers et prose” (https://www.artic.edu/artworks/73797/stephane-mallarme).

See also the description of this print at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/339426#.

Condition: a well-printed impression laid upon a support sheet of fine archival/millennium quality washi paper in a near pristine (museum quality) condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this small portrait study of the famous French Symbolist poet Mallarmé, who was a close friend of Whistler and of many other artists of the time like Gauguin—see Gauguin’s etched portrait of the poet:  https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1949-0411-2463—for AU$349 (currently US$270.12/EUR225.47/GBP195.17 at the time of posting this print) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this acknowledged very close likeness to the poet—and a print that both artist and sitter exchanged correspondence that it was “a marvel” and “very beautiful”, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 










Saturday, 17 April 2021

Charles Jacque’s etching, “Le Matin”, 1864

Charles Jacque (aka Charles Émile Jacque; Charles Jaque) (1813–1894)

“Le Matin” (Morning), 1846, plate 10 from the series of 24 etchings, “Collection d'eaux-Fortes”, printed in Paris by Sarazin (aka Sarasin) (fl.c1846-1880).

Etching and drypoint on chine collé (China) on cream wove paper with wide margins.

Size: (sheet) 28.9 x 41 cm; (plate) 14 x 21 cm; (chine collé) 9.9 x 16.2 cm; (image borderline) 9 x 15.4 cm.

Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “ch. Jacque”.

Lettered on plate above the image borderline: (left) “No. 10.”; (right) “2.”

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “CH. JACQUE”; (centre) “LE MATIN”; (right) “SARAZIN IMP.”

State iii (of iii) Guiffrey (1866) describes the second and third states: “Deuxième état: Le ciel est resté clair; la cheminée de la cheminère laisse échapper de la fumée; point sèche sur toute la planche. Troisième état: Tout est repris un burin & à la pointe; ciel coloré; la fumée est énlevée.” ([Transl.] “Second state: The sky remained clear; the chimney of the chimney lets out smoke; dry point all over the plate. Third state: Everything is taken over with a burin & at the tip; colourful sky; the smoke is raised.”) (p. 92).

Guiffrey 186 iii (J.-J. Guiffrey 1866, “L'Oeuvre de Ch. Jacque”, Paris, Lemaire, p. 92, cat. no. 186); IFF 289 (Jean Adhémar & Jacques Lethève 1954, “Inventaire du Fonds Francais Apres 1800”, Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, cat. no. 289).

Guiffrey (1866) offers the following description of this print:

(Transl.) “At the first light of the morning, mounted on one of his animals, a plough boy leaves the village with his two horses. A dog precedes them running. On the left, the houses still immersed in a semi-darkness; near them we can make out a man; to the right, other houses further away. Signed: Ch. Jacque.” (p. 92).

See also the description offered by the British Museum:

“Morning: landscape with in the foreground a peasant riding a horse going to the right, accompanied by another horse; cottages in the background; lettered state. 1864
Etching, on chine collé” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1889-0608-215).

Condition: a richly inked and well-printed impression with generous margins in a near pristine (museum quality) condition with no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing.

I am selling this very poetic and romantically beautiful—perhaps even iconic image—of what I see as the passing era in rural France towards the end of the 19th century before mechanization began to change everyday life, for AU$279 (currently US$215.83/EUR180.15/GBP155.92 at the time of posting this print) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally evocative etching by one of the luminaries of the Barbizon School, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 











Friday, 16 April 2021

Huot & Danguin’s engraving, “The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne”, 1885,

Adolphe-Joseph Huot (1839–1883) and Jean-Baptiste Danguin (1823–1894)

“The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne” (aka “La Vierge, l'Enfant Jésus et Ste. Anne” [plate title]), 1885, after Leonardo da Vinci’s painting (c1503) in the Louvre, Paris (inv. 776), plate XXIV printed by Charles Chardon (1832–1896), published by the Société Française de Gravure (aka Société des Graveurs au Burin) (fl.1868–)—a society that the BM advises was founded by Henriquel-Dupont at the Gazette des Beaux-Arts to publish plates for distribution to its members (see https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/term/BIOG183625). The plate in the collection of the Chalcographie du Louvre.

Engraving with etching on heavy wove paper trimmed with a narrow margin around the platemark on the top and sides and (possibly) along the platemark on the lower edge.

Size: (sheet) 30.9 x 30 cm; (image borderline) 31 x 21.5 cm.

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “PEINT PAR LÉONARD DE VINCI/ [faint] I RE [first year?] SÉRIE”; (centre) “SOCIÉTÉ FRANÇAISE DE GRAVURE/ La Vierge, l'Enfant Jésus et Ste. Anne/ (MUSÉE DU LOUVRE)/ Imp. Ch. Chardon”; (right) “GRAVÉ PAR A HUOT ET DANGUIN/ PLANCHE XXIV”.

Condition: a well-printed strong impression in near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of handling.

I am selling this superb engraving (with etching) of Leonardo’s famous painting showing the Virgin seated on her mother/St Anne’s lap coaxing baby Jesus away from grappling with a sacrificial lamb—the symbol for his passion—for the total cost of AU$312 (currently US$241.59/EUR201.61/GBP175.82 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this extraordinary 19th century translation into line of the colour and tones of Leonardo’s painting, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 












Thursday, 15 April 2021

Workshop of Hendrik Goltzius’ engraving, “Arcas aims his arrow at Callisto”, 1590

Workshop of Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617) and executed under Goltzius’ direction. (Note that amongst the students in Golzius’ workshop were the highly distinguished artists: Jacob Matham, Jan Saenredam, Jan Muller, Jacob de Gheyn II and Pieter de Jode.)

Arcas aims his arrow at Callisto” (Rijksmuseum title) (aka “Arcas Preparing to Kill his Mother, Changed into a Bear” [TIB title]), 1590, plate 29 from the series of fifty-two prints (of an originally planned 300), “Metamorphoses from Ovid”, initially published in Haarlem in 1589 by Hendrik Goltzius/Claes Jansz. Visscher (1587–1652) and later by Hendrik Bosch (Bos) (fl. 1717–1729) in Amsterdam in “Metamorphoses Book II”, lettered with Latin verses by Franco Estius (fl.1580s–1594).

Engraving on fine laid paper.

Size: (sheet) 22.6 x 31 cm; (plate) 17.6 x 25.6 cm; (image borderline) 16.5 x 25.3 cm.

Numbered on plate below the image borderline in the lower corners: (left) “9”; (right) “29”.

Lettered on plate below the image borderline with four lines of Latin in two columns: “Diclynne dilecta comes .../ ...// …/ …in axe lacat.”

State ii (of ii) with the addition of the plate number.

TIB 3 (3). 59 (107) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Hendrik Goltzius”, vol. 3, p. 327, cat. no. 59 (107); New Hollstein Dutch 560-2(2).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Plate 29: Landscape with Callisto as a bear on a river-bank at right, her son Arcas standing at left and pointing an arrow at her in order to kill her; after Hendrik Goltzius” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1947-0412-3-29).

See also the description of this print offered by the Rijksmuseum:

(Transl.) “Arcas, the son of Jupiter and Callisto, aims his arrow at a bear, unaware that it is his mother. She changed shape fifteen years earlier. In the background to the right you can see how Jupiter places mother and son in the sky before Arcas can shoot, as constellations. Two lines of verse in Latin under the depiction" (http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.594124).

Condition: a well-printed slightly silvery impression with generous margins (approx. 2.5 cm). The sheet is in an excellent condition with no tears, holes, abrasions, folds (but there are minor restored printer’s creases), losses, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this very beautiful engraving in a remarkably good condition considering its considerable age from Goltzius’ workshop, for the total cost of AU$340 (currently US$263.39/EUR219.88/GBP191.07 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this 16th century interpretation of the mythological story where Callisto—a nymph turned into a bear by the wife of Zeus after discovering Zeus had made the nymph pregnant—is about to be shot by her fully grown-up son, Arcas, but escapes being killed by rising into the heavens to become the constellation Ursa Major (“the Great Bear"), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold