Gallery of prints for sale

Thursday, 2 July 2020

Henry Augustin Valentin’s etching, “Le Christ Mort”, 1859, after Hans Holbein the Younger




Henry Augustin Valentin (1822–1886)

“Le Christ Mort” (title inscribed on plate), 1859, after Hans Holbein the Younger’s (c1497–1543) oil and tempera painting, “The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb” (1520–22) in the Musée de Bâle (Öffentliche Kunstsammlung, Basel), printed by Albert Quantin (1850–1930) and published in 1859 in Paris in the “Gazette des Beaux-Arts”, vol. 44, insert between pp. 98–99.

This print may be viewed in context in “Gazette des Beaux-Arts”, vol. 44, at archive.org:

Regarding Holbein’s painting, Wikipedia cites the interesting proposal by the art historians, Oscar Bätschmann and Pascal Griener, that Christ's raised and extended middle finger appears to "reach towards the beholder", while his strands of hair "look as if they are breaking through the surface of the painting" (Oskar Bätschmann, & Pascal Griener 1999, “Hans Holbein”, London, Reaktion Books, p. 88; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Body_of_the_Dead_Christ_in_the_Tomb).

Etching on cream laid paper printed in a warm black ink with full margins as published.
Size: (sheet) 31 x 45.1 cm; (plate) 12.6 x 34.6 cm; (outer image borderline) 7.7 x 31.3 cm.
Lettered on plate along the upper edge of the image: “IESVS·NAZARENVS·REX·IVDAEORVM” (Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews)
Inscribed on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Hans Holbein pinx/ Gazette des Beaux-Arts”; (centre) “Le Christ Mort/ (Musée de Bâle); (right) “H. Valentin sculp/ Imp. A Quantin”.

Condition: richly inked and well-printed, faultless, impression with generous, full margins as published. The sheet is in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, foxing or significant stains—but there is pale age-toning at the edges and a mark from the original tissue-guard attachment at the top edge).

I am selling this visually arresting etching of Holbein’s famous painting of Christ’s entombed body shown stretched by crucifixion with eyes and mouth open in an early stage of putrefaction—for AU$207 in total (currently US$143.48/EUR127.17/GBP114.72 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this seldom seen etching on the art market, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Wednesday, 1 July 2020

Antonio Tempesta’s etching, “Great Bison”, c.1620


Antonio Tempesta (1555?–1630)

“Great Bison” (aka “Bisons magnus/Bisonte grando”), c.1620, first state unnumbered impression from the series of 206 plates, "Nova raccolta animali piu curiosi del mondo" (aka “Animals and mythical creatures”), possibly published in Rome by Giovanni Giacomo de'Rossi (1627–1691) in or before 1650 (arguably with papal privilege from Pope Innocent X).

Etching and engraving on fine laid paper with an unevenly trimmed narrow margin around the plate mark.
Size: (sheet) 19.5 x 14.1 cm; (plate) 9.7 x 13.8 cm; (image borderline) 9 x 13.6 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Bisons magnus”; (right) “Bisonte grando”
State i (of ii) before the addition of the plate number.

Note: this is a rare print that is not held in the collection of either the British Museum or the Rijksmuseum, but the Rijksmuseum holds the two other etchings of bisons from the same series:
“Bisons/Bisonte” (aka Crested Bison) (http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.184394)
“Bisont/Bisone” (aka Locobardus Bison) (http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.184303).

In earlier posts I have showcased a few other etchings by Tempesta of animals that one doesn’t often see. For example, in one of his animal prints Tempesta featured a hippopotamus cleverly disguised as a beaver (see http://www.printsandprinciples.com/2016/12/antonio-tempestas-17th-century.htm). In another, he shared his fantasy by portraying a half dog and half goat having a wonderful time leaping around while being watched by a two-headed, six legged donkey (see http://www.printsandprinciples.com/2017/08/antonio-tempestas-etching-capras-canis.html).

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression trimmed unevenly with a narrow margin around the plate mark. The sheet is in superb condition for its considerable age with remnants of old mounting verso and minor staining.

I am selling this rare lifetime impression of Europe’s Great Bison—I understand that this bison has 14 ribs whereas the American bison has 15 ribs—for AU$286 in total (currently US$197.64/EUR175.96/GBP159.58 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this remarkable print featuring in the distant background a grim scene of a horse and rider attacked by a bison, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Tuesday, 30 June 2020

Charles E Wilson’s etching, "Paris, Vu Du Pont des Saints-Père, Le Soir", 1880, after Léon Pierre Herpin


Charles E Wilson (fl.c.1880)

"Paris, Vu Du Pont des Saints-Père, Le Soir", 1880, after Léon Pierre Herpin’s (1841–1880) 1879 painting, “Les Quais à Paris, la Nuit” (see https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/leon-pierre-herpin-1841-1880-les-quais-a-paris-la-44-c-67e0bf74ed), published in 1880 as plate XXVII (27) in the French periodical, “L’Art”, printed by François Liénard (fl.c.1860–1880s) in Paris.

Although I may be wrong, the view to the bridge, the Pont des Saints-Père (aka the Pont du Carrousel), is from the Pont Royal showing the old port of the Louvre on the left, the towers of Notre Dame right of centre in the far distance (?) with the flèche (spire) of the Sainte-Chapelle slightly to the left and the dome of the Institut de France on the right.

Etching on fine laid paper with full margins as published.
Size: (sheet) 30.7 x 43 cm; (plate) 23.4 x 33.4 cm; (image borderline) 20.7 x 31.9 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline:
(left) “Léon Herpin pinx./ L’Art”; (centre) "PARIS, VU DU PONT DES SAINTS-PÈRE, LE SOIR/ (Musée du Luxemboug)”; (right) “Ch. E. Wilson sc./ F. Liénard, Imp, Paris.”

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Evening view of Paris from Pont des Saints-Pères; boats moored at left, steamships travelling on the Seine; after Léon Herpin; illustration from 'L'Art' for 1880.”

Condition: richly inked, faultless impression, with full margins as published and in near pristine condition (i.e there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains, foxing or significant signs of use).

I am selling this superb etching of moonlight glowing on the Seine, executed at the height of the etching revival period (c.1850–1930)—a time when etchers celebrated their joy in the vital lines that the medium of etching allowed (as opposed to the earlier established tradition of engraving)—for AU$206 (currently US$141.13/EUR125.71/GBP114.93 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this marvellous evening view of Paris from Pont Royal to the Pont des Saints-Père and Notre Dame beyond, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.












Monday, 29 June 2020

Jean Honoré Fragonard’s etching, “Sainte Catherine d'Alexandrie”, c.1763, after Mattia Preti


Jean Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806)

“Sainte Catherine d'Alexandrie” (aka “Saint Catherine of Alexandria Cured by an Angel”), 1763–1764, after Mattia Preti’s (1613–1699) (aka Il Cavalier Calabrese [the Calabrian Knight]) painting on the ceiling of church of San Pietro a Maiella, in Naples.

Note: Georges Wildenstein in the catalogue rainsonné for Fragonard’s etchings (1955) advises that this etching was previously wrongly titled by Gaudour and Goncourt, “The Conception of the Blessed Virgin”. Consequently it does not show “a representation of the virginal conception of Christ” as described by the Curator of the British Museum (see BM inv. 1882,0311.1157). Instead, according to Wildenstein (1955) (transl.), it “represents a scene from the life of Saint Catherine, after a painting by Calabrèse [Mattia Preti] on the ceiing of the church of San Pietro a Maiella, in Naples” (p. 24). Wildenstein goes on to explain:
“The young saint, who was flogged on the orders of Emperor Maximin, awaits the punishment  in a dungeon. Two angels comfort her while she contemplates the dove, symbol of the Holy Spirit” (ibid).

Etching on buff laid paper trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderline.
Size: (sheet) 13.2 x 7.4 cm; (image borderline) 12.7 x 6.9 cm.
State i (of ii) Lifetime impression before the addition of signature and numbering.

Wildenstein 15; (Georges Wildenstein 1956, “Fragonard Aquafortiste”, Les Beaux Arts, Paris, p. 24, cat. no. xv [15]); Baudicour 16 (P de Baudicour 1859–61, “Le Peintre-Graveur Français continué”, vol. 1, Paris, p. 166, cat. no. 16): IFF 14 (Inventaire du Fonds Français: Bibliothèque Nationale, Département des Estampes, Paris, 1930, vol. IX, p. 287, cat. no. 14).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Enigmatic scene with dove flying above two naked angels standing beside a seated half-naked woman. c.1761/65 Etching”

See also the description of this print offered by Harvard Art Museums:

Condition: well-printed first-state/lifetime impression trimmed with a small margin around the image borderline. The sheet is in very good condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, stains or foxing—but there are thin areas that are not visible recto) with a collector’s stamp verso.

I am selling this extraordinarily beautiful and rare lifetime impression by Fragonard, for AU$496 (currently US$340.81/EUR302.85/GBP276.72 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally fine etching by one of the most important French masters of the 18th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Sunday, 28 June 2020

Frederic Regamey’s etching, “De L'Ame Des Betes”, 1873


Frederic Regamey (aka Frédéric Régamey) (1849-1925)

“De L'Ame Des Betes” (transl.) “Of the Soul of the Beasts”—no doubt a reference to René Descartes’ [1596–1650] proposition that animals do not feel anything and do not think because they do not speak, 1873.

Etching on fine cream laid paper, trimmed with a small margin around the image borderline (as published) and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 10.2 x 9.3 cm; (image borderline) 9.4 x 8.5 cm.

Condition: a delicate impression showing slight plate movement, trimmed with a narrow margin (3 mm) around the image borderline, in near pristine condition and laid onto a support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this exquisite and very small etching of a cat, which I see as seemingly breathing in the life of Paris from its high perch with birds flying past in formation, for AU$227 (currently US$155.80/EUR138.85/GBP126.28 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this gorgeous etching of a French cat in a state of contemplative bliss, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print has been sold