Thursday, 30 November 2017

Aegidius Sadeler II’s engraving, " Forest Landscape with Two Figures”, c1600, after Pieter Stevens II


Aegidius Sadeler II (aka Gillis Sadeler; Egidius Sadeler; Ægedius Sadeler) (c1570–1629)

"Forest Landscape with Two Figures” (TIB title), 1597–1629, plate 4 in the series of 8 plates, “Bohemian landscapes”, published by Aegidius Sadeler II and Marco Sadeler (as inscribed on the plate), after a drawing by Pieter Stevens II (c1567–1624) in the Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam.

Etching and engraving on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark.
Size: (sheet trimmed unevenly) 16.7 x 29.7 cm
Lettered on the plate below the image borderline: (left) “P Stephani Inuent: / Egi: Sadeler excud:”; (right) “Marco Sadeler excudit.”
State ii (of iv)

TIB 1997 7201.275 S2 (vol. 72, Part 2, Supplement, p. 79); Hollstein 1980, vol. 21, no. 266; Prag um 1600, no. 272; Piccin, no. 98
The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
“A forest landscape. On the road travellers. In the background an inn where hikers rest.”

Condition:  richly inked, crisp and well-printed impression trimmed on or within the platemark. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing). There are remnants of mounting (verso).

I am selling this exceptionally rare print—so rare that it is not in the collection of the British Museum—by one of the great master printmakers of the late Renaissance for the total cost of AU$337 (currently US$255.03/EUR215.30/GBP189.59 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this museum quality impression sparkling with strong tonal contrasts, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print has been sold


Interestingly, Isabelle de Ramaix (1998) in “The Illustrated Bartsch”, vol. 72, Part 2, Supplement, p. 79, advises that “Zwollo attributes the engraving to Isaac Major” (see, AN Zwollo 1968, “Pieter Stevens, ein vergessener Maler des Rudolfȉnische Kreises” in “Jahrbuch der Kunsthistorischen Sammlungen in Wien, n.s., 64, p. 158).

Although both august writers would have a much better understanding of the historical details underpinning the execution of this print, nevertheless, based solely on the publication details inscribed on the plate in state iii, I doubt that Isaac Major could be the printmaker who etched and engraved this plate. The reason is simply that in state iii (after the erasure of the publication details shown on this state ii impression) the lettered publication details state clearly: “Gravé par Sadeler” (i.e. the plate was engraved by Sadeler—presumably by Aegidius Sadeler).






Wednesday, 29 November 2017

Utagawa Yoshitora’s triptych woodblock print of Samurai in combat, c1848/64


Utagawa Yoshitora (aka Kinchoro [錦朝楼]) (歌川芳虎) (fl.c.1836–1882)
Triptych: “Samurai battle in Mountains” (descriptive title), c1848/64.

Three-panel colour woodblock print with binding holes.
Size: (each panel) 35.2 x 24.4 cm
Signature seal of Yoshitora with the publisher's seal and double censors' seals.
Condition: well-printed early lifetime impressions that have retained their rich colour and apart from a minor stains, abrasions and a few spots of unevenness at the edges (e.g. the centre panel has a partial worm hole at the upper right edge) the sheets are in very good condition for their age. The left panel has a closed tear that has been restored and the tear is now virtually invisible. This panel has been laid upon a fine washi paper support sheet.

I am selling this very rare woodblock triptych by Yoshitora—so rare that I have been unable to locate another complete copy of it online, but the Ritsumeikan University holds the centre panel: https://ja.ukiyo-e.org/image/ritsumei/mai01k09(2) —for AU$703 (currently US$533.91/EUR449.98/GBP398.57 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this spectacular panoramic view of a battle, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.



Looking at this panoramic spread of a battle is a wonderful reminder that battles may be more than men killing each other; a battle may also involve an intimate invasion of nature by man. Certainly from my viewpoint, I see the fighting samurai scaling the weather sculpted mountain shown in the centre panel as forming vein-like lines travelling INTO the “flesh” of the mountain. Going further, even the green of the surrounding grassy slopes may be seen as the landscape’s skin making the men scaling on and streaming into the red rock-face seem even more like they are engaged in a landscape invasion. This is a marvellous crystallisation of the early Japanese vision of the landscape anthropomorphised.










Tuesday, 28 November 2017

Thomas de Leu’s engraving, “Perseus”, c1613, after Antoine Caron


(Attrib.) Thomas de Leu (1560–1620) or Jaspar Isaac (aka Gasper Isac; Jaspar Isac; Gaspard Isac; Jaspar Isacsz; Jasper de Isaac) (1585–1654)

“Perseus”, 1613-1614, after Antoine Caron (1521–1599), illustration from “Les images ou tableaux de platte peinture des deux Philostrates” (1615), originally written by Philostratus (170?–245 AD), translated by Blaise de Vigenere (1523–1596) and published by Sébastien Cramoisy (fl.c.1620–1665), c1616 (earlier and later editions are recoded) and much later by Matthieu Guillemot, 1637, Paris, p. 254.

Engraving on laid paper, lined onto a conservator’s support sheet, trimmed along the platemark on the top and sides and with printed text (trimmed) as published at the lower edge.
Size: (sheet) 28.7 x 18.7 cm: (plate) 24.6 x 18.7 cm

Condition: crisp early impression (based on the lack of wear to the plate and the accumulation of paper pulp around the chainlines signifying early laid paper as opposed to later laid paper where the pulp is more evenly distributed) trimmed along the platemark and trimmed with loss to some of the printed descriptive text. The sheet has a few abrasions (restored and now virtually invisible) and has been laid upon a support sheet of fine washi paper.

I am selling this graphically arresting engraving from c1616 for AU$308 (currently US$233.94/EUR196.67/GBP175.78 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this strong image created only thirteen years after the first illustrated version of Cesare Ripa’s (1555–1622) “Iconologia” was published—the first book to describe abstract concepts in terms of images—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print has been sold


There are three printmakers—Thomas de Leu, Jaspar Isaac and Léonard Gaultier—involved in the engraving the illustrations for Blaise de Vigenere’s translation of Philostratus' “Les Images ou tableaux de platte peinture des deux Philostrates” in which this print features.

Regarding my attribution of this unsigned/anonymous engraving to Thomas de Leu, Jaspar Isaac executed the title page illustration and sixteen other plates but I believe that the treatment of this engraving is closer in style to that of Thomas de Leu who is known to have executed six of the plates (see for example the signed engraving by de Leu from the series: http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1457874&partId=1&searchText=Thomas+de+Leu&page=3). Again, based solely on the style of the engraving, I do not believe that it was executed by Léonard Gaultier (see an example of Gaultier’s style in my earlier post: http://www.printsandprinciples.com/2016/11/leonard-gaultiers-engraving-of-prophet.html). 

From what I have been able to see online, the major museums do not hold this engraving and so I have been unable to clarify the name of the engraver from such an institution’s standpoint. Nevertheless, the Metropolitan Museum of Art offers an abundance of important details about the publication; see: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/358999. Moreover, to see this plate in its context and to download a free eBook of this publication see: https://books.google.com.au/books?id=b8hgAAAAcAAJ&pg=PP278&lpg=PP278&dq=La+teste+de+Meduse+conuertit+en+rocher&source=bl&ots=Mmrac3zOH2&sig=CEKrVUW_j8voBT--HtCpc5OcHpU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjJ6IPq0ODXAhWEKpQKHQ7mDRUQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=La%20teste%20de%20Meduse%20conuertit%20en%20rocher&f=false)







Monday, 27 November 2017

Adriaen van Ostade’s etching, “The Pater Familias”, 1648


Adriaen van Ostade (aka Adriaen Jansz. van Ostade) (1610–1685)

“The Pater Familias” (aka “Le Père de la Famille”; “The Father”), 1648

Etching on fine paper without visible chainlines trimmed close to the platemark
Size: (sheet) 12.8 x 9.5 cm; (platemark) 12.6 x 9.4 cm; (image borderline) 12.2 x 9 cm
Signed on plate at lower edge: “AV. ostade 1648”
State v (of v) with rounded plate corners (Godefroy).

TIB 1.33 (v) (368) (Walter L Strauss & Leonard J Slatkes [eds.] 1978, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists”, vol.1, p.347); Hollstein 33.IV; Bartsch I.368.33; Godefroy 33 v/v; Boon-Verbeek 33 v/vi; Davidsohn 33 iv/iv
See also P van der Coelen 1998, “Everyday life in Holland's Golden Age: The Complete Etchings of Adriaen van Ostade”, ex. cat. Rembrandthuis, Amsterdam, no.34.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print (in the fourth state):
“The Pater Familias; a humble interior with the father carefully feeding his baby, watched by his wife who holds some laundry in front of the fire-place, another child sits before a stool on the floor eating a meal, a large pot is suspended before a fire at right, a bed with a curtain beyond. 1648 Etching” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1442178&partId=1&searchText=ostade+The+Pater+Familias&page=1)  

Condition: well-inked, crisp and well-printed impression in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of handling) trimmed close to the platemark. There is the remnant of a hinge at the top of the sheet (verso).

I am selling this sparkling crisp impression from the final state of this very important print in the oeuvre of Ostade for AU$310 (currently US$237/EUR198.44/GBP177.48 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this superb print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


Surprises happen when least expected.

Initially, when I set out to showcase this print, my vision was simple: I wanted to offer close-up details of Ostade’s marvellous etching so that they may be compared with related details in Jacque’s etched copy posted previously. What I had not anticipated is that this seemingly simply domestic scene of warm intimacy in a family would set me into a flurry of thinking.

Essentially, I realised that the portrayed family bliss must have been a shock at the time that it was executed. Indeed, it may even represent a watershed moment. After all, earlier depictions of domestic/tavern life invariably showed the antithesis of family cohesion and harmony; images that I would describe succinctly as “bad behaviour.” Interestingly, in just a few years after this print was created the whole notion of how family life should be portrayed changed significantly away from derogatory satire to positive celebration of domestic life as showcased by artists like Vermeer and de Hooch.

Regarding the change of attitude towards showing loving intimacy in domesticity, Leonard J Slatkes (et al., 1994), in the exhibition catalogue from the Georgia Museum of Art, “Adriaen van Ostade: Etchings of Peasant Life in Holland’s Golden Age”, offers rich insights into the shift of mindset and proposes that Rembrandt’s depictions of the Holy family may have prompted “a transformation of … religiously oriented intimacy into pure genre themes.” (see pp.177–8)







Sunday, 26 November 2017

Charles Emile Jacque’s etching, “The Pater Familias”, 1844, after Adriaen van Ostade


Charles Émile Jacque (aka Charles Jacque; Charles-Emile Jacque) (1813–1894) and/or Léon Subercaze (fl.1845–1849)

Note that the curator of the British Museum advises: “The lettering identifies the etcher as Charles Jacque, but Beraldi notes that several prints engraved after Tiepolo, Ostade, Chardin and Jeanron and ‘signed’ by Jacque are actually by Subercaze.” (see BM No. 1889,0608.292)

“The Pater Familias”, 1844, after Adriaen van Ostade (1610-1685), published in “L'Artiste”, 1844.

Etching on chine collé on thick wove paper lined onto a conservator’s support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 25 x 21.5 cm; (plate) 15.8 x 12.1 cm; (chine collé) 13.8 x 10 cm; (image borderline) 12.3 x 9.1 cm
Lettered above the chine collé: “L'Artiste”
Inscribed below the image borderline: “Gravé à l'eau forte par Ch. Jacque, d'après Ostade”
Inscribed within the image borderline right of centre at lower edge: “A. Ostade 1648”

Beraldi 1885-92 10 (Henri Beraldi 1885, “Les Graveurs du dix-neuvième siècle”, 12 vols plus supplement, Paris); Hollstein 33 (copy); IFF 504 (under Jacque); Bartsch I.368.33 (copy)

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The Pater Familias, after Ostade: a humble interior with the father carefully feeding his baby, watched by his wife who holds some laundry in front of the fire-place, another child sits before a stool on the floor eating a meal, a large pot is suspended before a fire at right, a bed with a curtain beyond”

Condition: richly inked, crisp and well-printed impression with generous margins and laid upon a fine washi paper conservator’s support sheet. There is an area of thinness at the left plate edge but this issue is addressed by the support sheet and the abrasion/thinness does not impact upon the chine collé or the image; otherwise the sheet is in very good condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, stains or foxing)
.
I am selling this etching after Ostade, signed by Jacque (but argued to be executed by Subercraze) for AU$161 (currently US$122.77/EUR102.86/GBP92.05 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this rare etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


In my previous post I lightly discussed the sensitivity of Léon Subercaze as a master printmaker of the 19th century. I also bemoaned the fact that there is very little biographical detail about this fine artist. To be honest, the only detail that I can find is offered by the British Museum that Subercraze was active as a printmaker between 1845 and 1849. Although this short time span could be lengthened to 1860, as I discovered an etching by Subercaze dated “1860”, the real issue is not a quibble about dates when he flourished. Instead, it’s a quibble about ethics. Specifically, the august Henri Beraldi (1885) in “Les Graveurs du dix-neuvième siècle” is cited by the curator of the British Museum to argue that Subercaze is the true etcher of this print after Ostade and not Charles Jacque whose name is inscribed on the plate. I wish that printmakers, publishers and the gate-keepers of history were always as honest …















Saturday, 25 November 2017

Léon Subercaze’s etching, “Young boy seated at a dinner table”, c1849


Léon Subercaze (fl.1845–1849)
“Young boy seated at a dinner table” (descriptive title only), c1849

Etching on fine buff coloured Japan paper (presumably it may once have been a chine- collé sheet), trimmed with margins around the image borderline, but before the platemark and lined onto a conservator’s support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 11.7 x 10 cm; (image borderline) 11 x 9.3 cm
Inscribed on the plate below the image borderline at left: “L. Subercaze”

The British Museum holds the following collection of etchings by Subercaze:  http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx?searchText=L%C3%A9on+Subercaze+

Condition: faultless impression in pristine condition laid upon a support sheet of washi paper.

I am selling this superb impression in museum-quality condition by one of the “forgotten” 19th century printmakers whose work is yet to be acclaimed for its quality (see my discussion) for AU$110 (currently US$83.88/EUR70.27/GBP62.89 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this simple but marvellously strong composition, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


Subercaze is one of the invisible printmakers of the 19th century whose significance will someday shake the history books—but only a little shake. The reason is simple: HE was the etcher responsible (but unacknowledged) for executing some of major reproductive plates of old master prints bearing the name of one of the most famous printmakers of the Barbizon School: Charles Jacque.

First glance at this print shows clearly that Subercaze was a sublime etcher. He is able to illuminate even the darkest of shadows—note how Subercaze illuminates the young boy’s forehead and uses the “bounced” light from this region to add reflected light into the deep shadows of the cap that the boy wears. Moreover, Subercaze could express even what a child is thinking—note the boy’s tiny hand finding comfort in his crossed arms and the placement of the spoon on the plate at just the “right” angle parallel to his arms on the table to declare, without words, that he is ”over” eating. Despite such clear indicators of a sensitive and insightful artist, biographical information about him is limited to a few years that he was an active printmaker. So strange! So sad!





Friday, 24 November 2017

Samuel Palmer’s etching, “The herdsman's cottage”, 1850


Samuel Palmer (1805–1881)
“The herdsman's cottage” (aka “Sunset”; “Sunrise”), 1850, published in “The Portfolio” (November 1872) under the title “Sunrise” and later published by PG Hamerton (1875) in “Examples of Modern Etching” and again by PG Hamerton (1880 third edition) in “Etching and Etchers.”

Size: (sheet) 30.8 x 22 cm; (indistinct platemark) 12? x 10? cm; (image borderline) 9.7 x 7.7 cm
Etching on buff coloured laid paper with full margins as published.
Inscribed on the plate below the image borderline at lower left margin: “SP”
State ii (of ii) with the addition of the artist’s initials

Lister 1969/1988 E.3.II (Raymond Lister 1969, “Samuel Palmer and his Etchings”, Watson-Guptill, p. 100; Raymond Lister 1988, “Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of Samuel Palmer”, Cambridge)

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Man and dog herding cattle in a wood by a cottage in the sunset. 1850 Etching”

Condition: richly inked, well-printed, virtually faultless copy in near pristine condition despite its age. .... oops! when I was posting the details I discovered the tiniest of a tiny hole that I had overlooked

I am selling this superb impression in museum-quality condition by one of the most famous of the British printmakers for AU$711 (currently US$542.13/EUR457.28/GBP407.91 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this print which the artist, arts writer and publisher, Philip Gilbert Hamerton, describes as being “like a pearl or diamond without flaw” (cited by Elixabeth Harvey-Lee: http://www.elizabethharvey-lee.com/exhibitions/palmer/palmer03_herdsman.htm) please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


Although the size of this print is very small—it’s about the size of one’s palm (presuming that everyone’s palm is around 9.7 x 7.7 cm)—the image is like a glimmering ember of a fiery light illuminating darkness. I may sound a tad poetic in how I see this tiny image but for me it captures perfectly the startling effect of what could best be described as a blast of radiating light from either a setting or rising sun filtering through a forest. No wonder that the herdsman shown in the lower-right corner looks up to contemplate the visual blast.