Gallery of prints for sale

Tuesday, 11 August 2020

Jan de Bisschop’s etching, “Dying Christ Supported by Angels,” c1670

Jan de Bisschop (aka Johannes Episcopius) (1628–1671)

“Dying Christ Supported by Angels,” c1670 (1668–1671 [Rijksmuseum dating]), after a red chalk drawing in the Albertina, Vienna (inv. no. 2128; see https://sammlungenonline.albertina.at/#/query/5a3b14ca-fc54-4ac9-ab84-d57b64007f86) formerly attributed to Annibale Carracci (1560–1609), plate 1 (after the title plate) in the series of 157 etchings by Jan de Bisschop, initially published at the Hague in 1671/72 by Nicolaas Visscher II (1649–1702) and later by Hendrik de Leth (1703–1766) in “Paradigmata Graphices Variorum Artificum”, with a title plate by Gerard de Lairesse (1640–1711) (see https://research.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3296238&partId=1). This impression is from the numbered and lettered Hendrik de Leth edition (c.1731–41).

See this publication and the context of this print online at archive.org:

https://archive.org/details/paradigmatagraph00biss_0/page/n3/mode/2up.

Etching on laid paper with wide margins.

Size: (sheet) 31.9 x 22.4 cm; (plate) 22.3 x 13.4 cm.

Inscribed on plate: (upper right corner) “1”; (lower left) “Ann.Caratus inv.del.”; (lower right) “Ann.Caratius inv.del.”; (lower right) “[De Bisschop's monogram] JE. f.” 

State iii (of iii) with the addition of the artist’s Latin monogram, the name of the designer and the plate number.

Hollstein Dutch 6 (F W H Hollstein 1950, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts ca. 1450–1700: Berckheyde–Bodding”, vol. 2, Amsterdam, Menno Hertzberger, p. 44, cat. no. 6); Gelder & Jost 1-3 (3) (Jan G van Gelder & Ingrid Jost 1985, “Jan de Bisschop and his Icones and Paradigmata: Classical Antiquities and Italian Drawings for Artistic Instrumentation in Seveneenth Century Holland”, Doornspijk, Davaco, p. 231, cat. no. 1).

See also the description of this print at the British Museum and the Rijksmuseum:

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1850-0810-754;

http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.466643.

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression in near faultless condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of handling).

I am selling this exceptionally beautiful translation (in reverse) of Carracci’s red chalk drawing in the Albertina of Christ as “The Man of Sorrows”, for AU$302 in total (currently US$216.58/EUR184.46/GBP165.72 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing what I see as a magnificent rendering of Christ’s musculature with convincingly drawn foreshortened legs and stretched torso (following his crucifixion), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Monday, 10 August 2020

Meister des Trostspiegels’ woodcut, “Conquest of a Castle,” c1532


Meister des Trostspiegels (aka Petrarch Master) (fl.c1520–1540)

Note: although the printmaker’s title, “Meister des Trostspiegels,” stems from the artist’s many (258) woodcut illustrations to Franceso Petrarca’s (1304–1374) “Trostspiegel” (1519/20), the true identity of the artist is possibly Hans Weiditz (c1500–1536). From a personal standpoint, however, earlier this evening I was convinced that the artist was Hans Burgkmair the Elder (1473–1531) and spent a great deal of time looking through the massive catalogue raisonné on Burgkmair (TIB vol. 11) to check. Sadly, I failed to find this print. Nevertheless, there are many woodcuts executed in a similar style by Burgkmair (see for instance, https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1837-0616-270), moreover, I understand that Burgkmair was a contributing illustrator working with the Meister des Trostspiegels in the early German editions.

“Conquest of a Castle,” c1532, from Franceso Petrarca’s “Vpn Hülff vnd Rath in Allem anligen,“ 1532.

Regarding the edition from which this impression was taken, I understand that a later edition was published in Frankfurt am Main by the heirs of the famous publisher, Christian Egenolff's (aka Egenolph) (1502–1555), in 1559 (see Willard Fiske’s 1882, “A Catalogue of Petrarch Books,” p. 23), titled: “Hülff, Trost vnd Rath in allem anligen der Menschen. Francisci Petrarche, des hochwei- sen, fürtreflichen Poeten vnd Oratorn, zwei Trost- biücher, Von Artznei vnd Rath beyde im guten vnd widerwertigen Glück” ([Google transl.] “Hülff, Trost vnd ​​Rath in all things human.  Francisci Petrarche, the wise, noble poet and orator, two consolation books, Von Artznei vnd Rath both in good and disgusting happiness”). Arguably, the quality of the impression, showing little or no sign of wear to the printing plate, and the form of the German letterpress text (verso) suggests the early/lifetime edition.

Woodcut on laid paper with letterpress German text verso, trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 14.5 x 16.1 cm; (image borderline) 14.4 x 15.6 cm.

Condition: a good but slightly grey impression. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing) and is laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this remarkable woodcut of a sixteenth century assault upon a citadel for the total cost of AU$197 (currently US$140.89/EUR119.81/GBP107.93 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this highly detailed old master woodcut, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Sunday, 9 August 2020

Nicolas Bonnart I’s engraving, “Ecce Homo,” c1690, after Raphael Sadeler I and after Jacopo Ligozzi

Nicolas Bonnart I (c1637–1718)

Ecce Homo,” c1690 (1680–1700), after the 1598 engraving by Raphael Sadeler I (1560/6–1628/32) (see https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_X-1-109) after the painting by Jacopo Ligozzi (1547–1627) in the Bavarian State Painting Collections (see https://www.sammlung.pinakothek.de/en/artwork/ZMLJr9VLJv/jacopo-ligozzi/ecce-homo).

Regarding the portrayed subject, according to the Rijksmuseum, the figure on the left is Pontius Pilate showing the scourged Christ to the Jewish people (see http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.168802), but the British Museum offers an alternative reading by advising that the left figure is Herod Antipas (see BM inv. no. X,1.109). The head to the left of Christ is Barabbas, the murderer released by the crowd.  

Engraving on laid paper with a small margin around the platemark.

Size: (sheet) 27.3 x 21.5 cm; (plate) 24.5 x 19.7 cm; (image borderline) 23.5 x 19.1 cm.

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “A Paris chez Nicolas Bonnart rue St Jacques a l'Aigle”; (centre) “ECCE HOMO.”

Condition: richly inked, near faultless impression, with a small margin (approx. 1 cm) around the platemark. The sheet has remnants of mounting (verso), otherwise the sheet is in an excellent condition for its age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this strong and near faultless impression executed after the engraving by Raphael Sadeler I and in turn after the painting by Jacopo Ligozzi, for the total cost of AU$261 (currently US$186.90/EUR158.54/GBP143.14 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this sensitively executed engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold

Saturday, 8 August 2020

Stefano Mulinari’s etching with sulphur tint, “Processional Scene with Horses,” 1782, after Polidoro da Caravaggio

Stefano Mulinari (c1741–c1790)

“Processional Scene with Horses” (descriptive title only), 1782, plate 1 from the series of 100 plates, “Scuola Italiana o sia Nuova Raccolta di Stampe a Forma di Disegni ...” (The Italian School or a New Collection of Prints after Drawings ...), after Polidoro da Caravaggio (aka Polidoro Caldara; Polidoro da Caravagio), published by Venanzio Monaldini (fl.1765–1819) in Rome.

Etching and sulphur tint, printed in brown ink on laid paper, trimmed with a small margin around the image borderline and text lines.

Note: the sulphur tint process is a precursor to aquatint. The technique may involve mixing sulphur into a paste with vegetable oil and smearing it over the selected areas of the plate and allowing the sulphur to corrode the plate with fine pitting or simply sprinkling the sulphur onto the plate and heating it. Unlike aquatint, the sulphur tint process does not allow for variation of tone or dark tones.

Size: (sheet) 28 x 40.9 cm; (outer image borderline) 23 x 40.3 cm.

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) Polidoro da Caravaggio inv: e del:”; (centre) A Sua Altezza Reale […] Vescovato di Munster ec. ec.” (a dedication to the Archbishop-Elector of Cologne and the Bishop of Münster, Maximilian Friedrich, [1708–1784]); (right) “SMulinari incis: 1782.”

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Plate 1: processional scene after Polidoro da Caravaggio, men and women, some on horseback, moving to the right, a man embracing a young boy at left. 1782 Etching with sulphur tone printed in brown”

(https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1936-1010-39-2).

Condition: an early richly inked impression showing no sign of wear to the printing plate, trimmed with a narrow margin around the image borderline. The sheet has a few worm holes otherwise it is in a very good condition for its age with no tears, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this strong impression glowing with the raw sienna colour of the printing ink and velvety texturing created by the early etching technique termed “sulphur tint”—a process predating aquatint where sulphur is used as the mordant to corrode the copper printing plate to form copper sulphide and fine pitting to the plate—for the total cost of AU$253 (currently US$181.18/EUR153.70/GBP138.76 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this beautifully executed frieze, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


Thursday, 6 August 2020

Engraving from the circle of Raphael Sadeler I, “Labor,” c1591, after Maarten de Vos

Unidentified engraver from the circle of Raphael Sadeler I (1560/61–1628/32)

Note: there is a possibility that this is a first state impression by Raphael Sadeler I before the inscribed signature details were added in the second state. I have my doubts, however, as the foliage in the distant tree at far right doesn’t appear “right.” Nevertheless, the plate size is close to Sadeler’s engraving and Sadeler may have altered the foliage in the second state which may account for the inconsistency to the treatment of the foliage that I see.

“Labor”, c1591, after the engraving by Raphael Sadeler I, after a drawing by Maarten de Vos (aka Maarten de Vos; Maerten de Vos) (1532–1603) in the Bibliothèque Royale Albert 1er, Berlin (inv. F 244.74), published by Claes Jansz. Visscher (aka Nicolaes Jansz.Visscher; Piscator) (1587–1652).

Engraving on laid paper trimmed with a small margin around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet trimmed slightly unevenly) 21.8 x 25.5 cm; (image borderline) 19.5 x 25 cm.

Lettered above the image borderline: (centre) “LABOR”.

Numbered within the image borderline on lower edge: (left of centre) “2”.

Lettered below the image borderline in two columns of four lines of Latin: “Inde ubi iam firmata …/ …/ …/ …// …/ …/ …/ … cupio posteritate coli."

TIB 7101.190 C1 (Isabelle de Ramaix 2006, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Raphael Sadeler I”, vol. 71, Part I [Supplement], New York, Abaris Books, p. 273, cat. no. [7101] .190 C1).

Ref. for Raphael Sadeler I: Hollstein XXI.255.207; Hollstein XLIV.289.1463 (F. W. H. Hollstein 1954–2010, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts,” vols. 1-64, Amsterdam, 1954–2010, cat. no. 255, p. 207; 1463, p. 289).

The Metropolitan Museum of Art offers the following insights about this print:

“Love, labor, honor, and pain: these are the four stages of human life according to many early modern artists, including Sadeler. In this image of labor, Minerva, goddess of crafts, commerce, and the arts (as well as wisdom), appears above a muscular young man who seems to have been interrupted in the act of measurement. He gazes at a building under construction, with a compass in his left hand, a large architectural treatise in his right, and various instruments of the liberal arts at his feet. In the distance are industrious scenes of men and women engaged in harvesting and weaving. Labor is understood here to encompass not only the virtues of physical activity but also the diligence required to produce works of art, mathematics, and science”

(https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/739485?).

Condition: strong impression trimmed with a small margin around the image borderline and laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet has a flattened centrefold and restorations (e.g. tears at upper left corner and a hole in the lower margin to the left of the lettered text), otherwise the sheet is in a good condition for its considerable age with no significant stains.

I am selling this interesting engraving expressing the early 17th century notion of work—as expressed through the symbolic representation of the tools of trades and the liberal arts, physical labour, technical manuals and best practices—for the total cost of AU$287 (currently US$206.85/EUR174.73/GBP157.72 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this beautifully executed old master engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.