Gallery of prints for sale

Wednesday, 24 October 2018

Philips Galle’s engraving, “Ops”, 1574


Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)

“Ops” (as inscribed on plate) (aka “Agriculture” (TIB title), 1574, plate 1 from the series of 8 engravings, “The Human Labours” (BM title) (aka “Personifications of Industrial and Professional Life” [TIB title]), after Marten van Cleve I (aka Marten van Cleef; Maerten van Cleve) (1527–1581) or Frans Floris (aka Frans Floris van/de Vriendt, 1519/1520–1570), with descriptive text by Hugo Favolius (1523–1585), published initially by Philips Galle (see the impression held by the Rijksmuseum, RP-P-1952-531), later by Johannes Boel (1592–1640) (see the impression held by the British Museum, 1950,0520.434), and finally published by Joannes Galle (1600–1676) in Antwerp. This impression is from the Joannes Galle edition (as inscribed on plate on the lower image borderline).

Engraving on fine laid paper with margins.
Size: (sheet) 24.9 x 30.6 cm; (plate) 20.5 x 24.6 cm; (image borderline) 20.5 x 20.2 cm
Lettered on plate within the image borderline: (upper left) “f.”; (upper centre) “ARTES PRACTICÆ, MAN VALES ET HONESTÆ./ OPS.”
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (on barrel at lower left) “F.Floris inuent.”; (left of centre at lower edge) “Ioan. Galle excud.”
Lettered in Latin on plate below the image borderline in two columns of two lines: Magna Deûm …/ … // …/ …auras./ Hugo Fauolius caneb.”
Numbered on plate below the image borderline: (centre) “1”.
State: iii (of iii) with the addition of the line of text above the allegorical figure, “Ops”, and the publication details of Joannes Galle.

TIB 5601.084:1 (Walter L Strauss & Arno Dolders [eds.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch”, vol. 56, Supplement, p. 315); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 148.II (Frans Floris); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 382.II (Philips Galle).

Condition: crisp, richly inked and near faultless impression with margins in museum-quality/excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing).

I am selling this rare engraving from 1574 for a total cost of AU$270 (currently US$191.37/EUR167.89/GBP148.14 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this important and very beautiful print showcasing the agricultural aspirations of the 16th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print in its first state published by Philips Galle (who is also the engraver of the print):
(transl.) “In the foreground the Roman goddess of Agriculture Ops. She is surrounded by all kinds of agricultural and horticultural products and tools. In the background a plowing and sowing farmer. The print has a Latin caption and is part of a series of prints about human activities.”

See also the description of this print in its second state at the British Museum:
“Ops personifying agriculture; she sits holding a sickle besides a wheatsheaf bound with grape vine and is surrounded by the abundance of agriculture, barrels and tools etc; in the distance a field is ploughed and a man sows seeds”

Regarding the third state (shown here) published by Joannes Galle, the meaning of the print is now made unambiguously clear with the Latin text inscribed at the top of the image: “ARTES PRACTICÆ, MAN VALES ET HONESTÆ” (Google transl. “Practical art MAN is valid and honesty”) which I understand to mean the virtues of honest work.

There is one change over the course of the various states that catches my eye more than any other and it is the erasure of date of the engraving’s execution (1574) on the barrel and its substitution with the name of the artist who (arguably) designed the composition: Frans Floris. This may not seem at first to be extraordinary change to the print, but when a viewer is reminded that one of the greatest feats of fame of this Flemish artist was his propensity to drink copious amounts alcohol then his name written across the barrel seems shockingly appropriate.







Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Raphael Sadeler I’s engraving, “View of a Harbour with Large Waves”, c1590


Raphael Sadeler I (1560/61–1628/32)

“View of a Harbour with Large Waves” (TIB title), c1590, after a lost drawing by Pieter Stevens II (c1567–after 1624), published by Raphael Sadeler I (as inscribed on plate).

Etching with engraving on fine laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 21.4 x 28.3 cm; (plate) 21 x 27.9 cm; (image borderline) 20.1 x 27.7 cm
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower right) “P. Stephan. In:/ Raph. Sadeler ex.”
Lettered in Latin on plate below the image borderline in four columns of two lines: “Fluctiuago …/ …// …/ …// …/ …// …/ …aquas.”
State i (of i) Note: the crisp linework with no sign of wear to the plate suggests that this is a lifetime or an early impression.

TIB 7102.06 (Isabelle de Ramaix [ed.] 2007, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Raphael Sadeler I”, vol. 71, Part 2 [Supplement], Abaris Books, p. 215); Wurzbach, no. 127, 2; Hollstein 1980, vol. 21, no. 55 (Raphael Sadeler II); Edquist, p. 312, no. 40b.

Condition: richly inked, faultless impression in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing) trimmed close to the platemark. The sheet has been laid onto a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this museum quality impression—shimmering with strong contrasts of light and dark—that is so rare that it is neither in the collection of the British Museum nor the Rijksmuseum, for AU$345 in total (currently US$243.76/EUR212.68/GBP188.04 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing arguably one of the best examples of a harbour scene rendered with theatrical drama of the period style known as Mannerism, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


Research for this print was a tad difficult as it is so rare that reliable information is limited to the catalogue raisonnés rather than online repositories at major museums like the British Museum and the Rijksmuseum (neither of which possess a copy of this print). Making the task even more problematic is that “The Illustrated Bartsch” attributes the print to Raphael Sadeler I (TIB 7102.06) whereas Holstein assigns it to Raphael Sadeler II (Hollstein 1980, vol. 21, no. 55 [Raphael Sadeler II]). Not that even these august authorities are always spot on as TIB (vol. 71, Part 2 [Supplement], p. 215) describes this print as an engraving, but close examination reveals that many of the richer black lines are etched.

Interestingly, the proportional amount of engraving to etching may be a guide to determining who the true printmaker may be, as when I was reading Isabelle de Ramaix’s introduction to the TIB volume on Raphael Sadeler I, I discovered the following riveting piece of information:
“Like Johan Sadeler I, Raphael I always first etched his plates, but he engraved less with the burin than his elder brother, so that the etched lines remain clearly visible” (TIB, vol. 71, Part 2 [Supplement], p. 1). I also discovered in the same introductory essay by Isabelle de Ramaix that “Raphael II usually signed himself as Raphael Junior“ (ibid) and this helps to clarify that the true printmaker is indeed Raphael Sadeler I.








Monday, 22 October 2018

David Kandel’s woodcut, “Rhinoceros”, 1550, after Albrecht Dürer



David Kandel (1520/25–1592/96)

“Rhinoceros”, 1550, after Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) (Meder 273), printed by Heinrich Petri (fl.c.1527–1577), published in a German edition of Sebastian Münster’s (1488–1552), “Cosmographia”, published in German from 1550 to 1628.

Woodcut with letterpress text printed recto and verso on fine laid paper (as published).
Size: (sheet) 30.7 x 19.9 cm; (Rhinoceros recto) 10 x 14.6 cm; (woodcut verso) 2.8 x 5.7 cm
With the monogram of David Kandel (entwined letters): “DK”

Hollstein 10p; Nagler 1858-79 II.1173.5; Bartsch IX.394.17
Note that the British Museum’s leaf featuring Kandel’s rhinoceros (see BM no. 1850,1014.988) is from the Latin edition of “Cosmographia” and features on the verso side a woodcut of “an elephant carrying various figures on a large saddle to right, by an anonymous printmaker”.

Condition: well-printed impression with full margins as published in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this extremely rare woodcut for AU$350 (currently US$248.63/EUR216.46/GBP191.49 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this superb woodcut in museum quality condition after Dürer’s famous “Rhinoceros”, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold




This woodcut by Kandel after Dürer’s famous “Rhinoceros” (1514) was a plate in a series of 22 illustrations for the enlarged edition of “Cosmographia”—the first publication offering descriptions of the world and, interestingly, the first to feature a map of the Americas—initially published in Basle in 1550 and republished another 15 times with German text with the last printing in 1628. The Curator of the British Museum advises that this enlarged edition “contained around 900 illustrations and 40 maps” (see BM no. 1850,1014.972).

For those who may not be familiar with Dürer’s depiction of a rhinoceros—an Indian rhinoceros I understand—the design of the woodcut is based on a sketch made by an unidentified artist when the portrayed rhino was in Lisbon. Essentially, Dürer never had the chance to see this particular animal as the rhino drowned when the ship that was transporting it from Lisbon to Rome became shipwrecked. What Kandel/Dürer have depicted in their illustration of a rhino is consequently a concoction of rhino details and understandably, some are not quite right, such as an “extra” horn on the neck of the animal and the marvellous patterning of spots on its hide.






Sunday, 21 October 2018

Pietro Savorelli’s engraving, "Zorobabel", c1805, after Michelangelo


Pietro Savorelli (c1765–1805)

"Zorobabel", c1805, after the fresco lunette by Michelangelo in the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, second plate from the series of eight engravings of the lunettes, published in Rome (c1805) by the Calcografia Romana (1738–1870) as part of a long series on the Sistine vault.

Engraving on heavy wove paper with full margins and the dry/blind stamp/seal of the Calcografia Romana press on the plate mark at lower right as published.
Size: (sheet) 54.5 x 72 cm; (plate) 39.5 x 52.6 cm; (image borderline) 34.3 x 48.5 cm.

Numbered on plate above the image borderline: (centre) “II”.
Lettered on plate within the image: (upper left) “'MICHAEL ANGELVS BONAROTIUS PINXIT”; (upper right) “IN SIXTINO VATICANO SACELLO”; (lower centre) “ZOROBABEL".
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (centre) “PIO SEPTIMO PONT. OPT. MAX./  Roma Presso la Calcografia Camerale”; (right) “Petrus Savorelli del. et sculp. Romae”.


Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression with full margins as published in near faultless condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this huge engraving in near pristine condition for AU$210 (currently US$149.54/EUR129.65/GBP114.59 at the time of this listing). Postage for this print is extra and will be the actual/true cost of shipping.

If you are interested in purchasing this masterwork of engraving in museum quality condition, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.



For those wondering about the significance of the prophet named Zorobabel featured in this lunette, according to Wikipedia, he “was a governor of the Persian Province of Judah (Yehud Medinata)” and “laid the foundation of the Second Temple in Jerusalem” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zerubbabel). As a prophet, Zorobabel, had divine guidance from “the Lord of Hosts” who advised him (according to the Hebrew Bible in “The Prophecy of Haggai”): “I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen” (Haggai 2:23–2:23). Essentially, Zorobabel’s mission was to rebuild the Second Temple following the Lord’s command without deviation.







Saturday, 20 October 2018

Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine’s etching (with drypoint), “The Large Bagpiper”, 1787



Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine (aka Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gordaine) (1745–1830)


“The Large Bagpiper”, 1787. Note that the word “large” in the title is in reference to the plate size as there is a second etching by Norblin that is is slightly smaller featuring a bagpiper (see BM no. 1853,0312.290: http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1533605&partId=1&searchText=norblin+&page=1)
Etching and drypoint on ivory Japanese (wove) paper with small margins and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 9.1 x 6.3 cm; (plate) 8.1 x 5.5 cm
Inscribed on plate in reverse: (upper right) “Norblin fecit Varsovie 1787'.
State ii with added drypoint outline

Hillemacher 1848 27.II
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Standing man playing bagpipes; on white ground; second state, with right arm outlined with drypoint.”

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression with small margins (approximately 4 mms) laid onto a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet has light staining in the upper left and lower right corners from old glue on the verso otherwise the print is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or foxing).

I am selling this seemingly simple and freely inscribed etching by one of the most important artists of the Enlightenment in Poland for AU$256 (currently US$182.30/EUR158.05/GBP139.69 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this small masterwork from the 1700s following in the tradition of Rembrandt, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold




To be honest, I do not know why Norblin chose to portray a chap playing bagpipes, but I doubt that the reason was simply because he liked bagpipe players. From my standpoint, mindful that Norblin’s prints often reference the old masters, I believe that this bagpipe player in his peasant dress addresses the recurrent theme in the 17th century of showing bagpipers as figures connected with bawdy reveling. If I may go further with this proposal, the fact that the piper looks backwards instead of forwards may also add to this idea of him being more than JUST a music maker. After all, the more common way of portraying folk of dubious character is to show them looking sneakily over their shoulder at the mayhem that they have caused. 







Friday, 19 October 2018

Odoardo Fialetti’s etching, “A Satyr with a Jawbone Striking a Lion who attacks a Man”, c1625


Odoardo Fialetti (1573–1626/27)

“A Satyr with a Jawbone Striking a Lion who attacks a Man” (TIB title), c1625, from the series of ten plates (including the titlepiece), “Vertical Grotesques” (aka “Disegni varii di Polifilo Zancarli”), after Polifilo Giancarli (fl.c.1620–57) (“Disegni varii di Polifilo Zancarli”), possibly published by Tasio Giancarli (fl.1625) in Venice.

Etching with plate tone on laid paper with small margins backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 25.4 x 16.4 cm; (plate) 23.9 x 15 cm; (image borderline) 22.4 x 14.7 cm
Inscribed on plate below the image borderline: (left) ”Poliphilvs Giancarli In.”; (right) “OF [monogram] inci”
State i (of i)

TIB 38.49 (Sebastian Buffa [ed.) 1983, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Italian Artist of the Sixteenth Century”, vol. 38, p. 239); Bartsch XVII.280.49; Berlin 1939 559 (P Jessen 1939, “Katalog der Ornamentstichsammlung der Staatlichen Kunstbibliothek Berlin”, Berlin).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(transl.) “The lower body of the man who gets bitten ends in a leaf with flowers. Leaf from series of 10 sheets with vertical panels full of foliage, figures and animals.”
See also the description of this print at the British Museum:

Condition: crisp impression showing very little wear to the printing plate in very good condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions but there are a few minor marks commensurate to the age of the print). The sheet has small margins and is laid onto a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this exceptionally rare etching for AU$350 in total (currently US$249.95/EUR217.90/GBP191.78 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this early masterpiece of ornamental design, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.
This print has been sold


Although I often stumble into the dangerous territory of making broad generalisations, I feel compelled once again to propose a sweeping statement that helps to explain the slightly silvery quality of this rather beautiful etching … (hold your breath for a second as I make a statement that I will probably regret in the future): Italian printmakers and draughtsmen in the 16th and 17th centuries tended to use organic based blacks which lends their artworks a greyish tonality compared to the German artists of the same period who tended to use mineral based blacks which gives their artworks strong tonal contrasts.

Now that I’ve made my very arguable proposal, this print is not an impression taken from a worn plate, but rather it is an impression made with a greyish coloured ink. If I may go a little further with very debatable generalisations—and this time I fully expect to be hauled over hot coals—Italian printmakers tend to be less fastidious in the way that they ink and pull their prints compared to the German printmakers of this time period. This leaning not to care too much helps to explain the curiously interesting thumb print of the printmaker that may be seen on the left arm of the chap being attacked by the lion. Lack of concern, also helps to explain the crumbled edge on the left side of this impression that signals (at least to me) that the press pressure was not adjusted perfectly.

(My apologies if my sweeping statements are too sweeping.)