Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 9 December 2022

Francisco de Goya’s etching, “Against the Common Good”, 1814–15

Francisco de Goya (aka Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes) (1746–1828)

“Against the Common Good” (“Contra el Bien General”), 1814–15, plate 71 from the series of eighty plates, “The Disasters of War” (“Los Desastres de la Guerra”), published in Madrid in 1863 in “Los Desastres de la Guerra: Coleccion de ochenta láminas inventadas y grabadas al agua fuerte por Don Francisco Goya” (see https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/art-artists/book/los-desastres-de-la-guerra-coleccion-de-ochenta-laminas-inventadas-y & https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/art-artists/work-of-art/contra-el-bien-general).   

Etching and burnished aquatint on laid paper printed in a warm black ink on cream laid paper with wide margins.

Size: (sheet) 25.9 x 32.1 cm; (plate) 17.6 x 21.1 cm; (image borderline) 14.7 x 18.5 cm.

Numbered and lettered in plate outside the image borderline: (upper left corner) “71”; (lower centre) “Contra el ‘bien general.”  

State iii (of iii) with the addition of the title.

Delteil 190 (Loys Delteil 1906, “Le Peintre-Graveur Illustré: (XIXe et XXe siècles)”, vol. 15, Paris, Chez lauteurp, cat. no. 190 [see https://archive.org/details/lepeintregraveur1415delt/page/n279/mode/2up]); Harris 191 (Tomás Harris 1964, “Goya: Engravings and Lithographs”, vol. I [text and Illustrations], vol. II [catalogue raisonné], Oxford).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Plate 71: demon with bat's wing ears sitting on chair writing in volume, with imploring figures below to right; from an unbound album of first impressions, 1863. c.1814-1815” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1975-1025-290).

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression showing no sign of wear to the printing plate with wide margins in a near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains, foxing or signs of handling.

I am selling this remarkable etching—possibly a demon from the Inquisition chronicling confessions from victims of judicial torture? (My apologies if I am wrong about this)—from Goya’s famous series, “The Disasters of War”, for the total cost of AU$988 (currently US$632.26/EUR545.74/GBP545.74 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this creatively inventive masterwork, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Thursday, 8 December 2022

Thomas Landseer’s soft-ground etching, “Hand Study from ‘The Sleeping Groom’”, 1817, after Benjamin Robert Haydon

Thomas Landseer (1795–1880)

“Hand Study from ‘The Sleeping Groom’”, 1817, from a series of seven soft-ground etchings after Benjamin Robert Haydon (1786–1846), published in 1817 by Thomas Landseer in “Haydon's drawing-book”, with an inscribed extract from Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” spoken by Lady Macbeth in Act 2, Scene 2, lines 6–10 (see https://www.litcharts.com/shakescleare/shakespeare-translations/macbeth/act-2-scene-2).

See this etching and another plate showing two hands described by the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1866-1013-418-419.

Soft-ground etching on chine collé on wove paper, trimmed with a small margin around the platemark and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (support sheet) 33.7 x 34.2 cm; (sheet) 20 x 21.2 cm; (plate) 19.1 x 19 cm; (chine collé) 19.1 x 19.2 cm.

Lettered in plate along the lower edge: (left) “B. R. Haydon. delt./ SLEEPING GROOM”; (centre) “Pub. May 7. 1817 by: T. Landseer 33 Foley Street, London.”; (right) “T. Landseer Sct./ — “The surfeited Grooms/ “Do mock their charge with snores. I’ve drugg’d their possets/ “That Death and Nature do contend about them. — Lady Macbeth.”

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression, trimmed around the platemark and laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper providing wide margins. Beyond slightly dusty margins to the original sheet, the sheet is in a good condition with no tears, folds, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this marvellous study of a hand executed as a soft-ground etching, for the total cost of AU$237 (currently US$159.29/EUR151.36/GBP130.77 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally fine hand study, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Wednesday, 7 December 2022

Jules Edmond Cuisinier’s etching, “A Fallen Fledgling”, late 1800s

Jules Edmond Cuisinier (1857–1917)

“A Fallen Fledgling” (descriptive title only), late 1800s, proof-state impression before lettering, possibly executed around the time of Cuisinier’s macabre etching with aquatint, “Le Concert Fantastique”, 1877 (see https://www.artsy.net/artwork/jules-edmond-cuisinier-le-concert-fantastique).

Around the time that Cuisinier was creating his somewhat troubling images of death and disenfranchisement—arguably following in the footsteps of Bosch and Goya—he was living near the La Santé prison in Paris that was infamously popular for its public executions. No doubt Cuisiner’s mindset was also coloured by having witnessed the displaced lives of the indigenous Melanesian inhabitants, the Karnak, by French settlement when he visited New Caledonia (see https://moellerart.net/en/artists-and-publications/drawings-watercolours-and-oilstudies/93/).

Etching with drypoint, aquatint and plate tone on cream laid paper (with partial watermark).

Size: (sheet) 18.6 x 37 cm; (plate) 13.2 x 31.9 cm; (image borderline) 11.8 x 30.2 cm.

Inscribed in plate within the image borderline: (upper right): “E Cuisinier sc”.

Condition: a richly inked and well-printed proof-state impression with adequate/good margins in an excellent condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this superb study of a fledgling that must have fallen from its nest, for the total cost of AU$349 (currently US$233.63/EUR221.93/GBP191.82 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this amazingly insightful etching of a bird—note the confident and sparing use of line—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Monday, 5 December 2022

Johann Theodor de Bry’s etching, “The Port of Lisbon”, c1592

Johann Theodor de Bry (aka Jean Théodore de Bry; Jan Dirk de Bry) 1561–1623)

“The Port of Lisbon”, c1592, engraved illustration on page 1 to the third part (of fourteen parts) of Hans Staden’s (c1525–c1576) “Great voyages”, titled: “Americae tertia pars Memorabile[m] provinciae Brasiliae historiam contine[n]s, Germanico primùm sermone scriptam à Ioa[n]ne Stadio Homburgensi Hesso, nunc autem Latinitate donatam à Teucrio Annaeo Priuato Colchanthe Po: & Med” (The third part of America contains the Memorable history of the province of Brazil, first written in German by Joanne Stadio Homburgensi Hesse, but now given in Latin by Teucrio Annaeus Priuato Colchanthe Po: & Med), published in 1592 in Frankfurt-am-Main possibly arranged by Sigismund Feyerabend (aka Sigmund Feyerabend; Sigmund Feierabend; Sigismund Feyrabend) (1528–1590) and later published in 1634 by Matthäus Merian I (aka Matthaeus Merian) (1593–1650).

Archive.org offers an online view of Staden’s publication and the context of this print: https://archive.org/details/americaetertiapa00stad_3/page/1/mode/1up.

The Historical Service of Defence/Department of the Navy (Paris) offers the following description of this print as showing (transl.) “the bank of the Tagus, between the Jardim do Tabaco (Tobacco Garden) and the Terreiro do Paço (Palace Square). We can observe the intense participation of Africans in the many activities that take place in the quay, in particular the operations of loading and unloading of goods, but also their use in navigation tasks, as rowers and especially as sailors. or crew members in Portuguese caravels” (http://histoire-du-portugal.blogspot.com/2014/04/le-port-de-lisbonne-gravure-du-xvieme.html).

Etching printed in umber ink on laid paper with watermark.

Size: (sheet) 21.1 x 23.4 cm; (image borderline) 15.8 x 19 cm.

Condition: a richly inked and well-printed lifetime impression (based on the quality of the line showing no sign of wear to the printing plate) with adequate/good margins in an excellent condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this superb etching showing Lisbon’s busy port in the 16th century marking the beginning of Hans Staden’s historically important account of his voyage to Brazil—one memorable experience that made my toes curl in horror was feeling Staden’s shock after finishing a “delicious soup” and discovering “in the bottom of the [soup] cauldron some small skulls, which he later found out to be those of the boys in his choir” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Staden—for the total cost of AU$244 (currently US$163.84/EUR156.33/GBP134.56 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally rare and historically important early record port activities in the 16th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Thomas Landseer’s soft-ground etching, “Hand and Wrist of ‘Duncan’”, 1817, after Benjamin Robert Haydon

Thomas Landseer (1795–1880)

“Hand and Wrist of ‘Duncan’”, 1817, from a series of seven soft-ground etchings after Benjamin Robert Haydon (1786–1846), published in 1817 by Thomas Landseer in “Haydon's drawing-book”. See this etching and another plate showing two hands described by the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1866-1013-420-420-. Although I may be wrong, the subject possibly relates to Hadon’s studies for “The Murder of Duncan – Macbeth Stabbing Duncan” (see https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:28274).

Soft-ground etching on chine collé on wove paper, trimmed with a small margin around the platemark and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (support sheet) 34.2 x 44 cm; (sheet) 17.8 x 30.5 cm; (plate) 15.2 x 28 cm; (chine collé) 15 x 28 cm.

Lettered in plate along the lower edge: (left) “DUNCAN/ B. R. Haydon. delt.”; (centre) “Pub. May 1. 1817 by T. Landseer 33 Foley Str: London.”; (right) “T. Landseer Sct

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression, trimmed around the platemark and laid onto a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper providing wide margins. Beyond slightly dusty margins to the original sheet, the sheet is in a good condition with no tears, holes, folds, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this simply magnificent study of a hand executed as a soft-ground etching, for the total cost of AU$237 (currently US$161.32/EUR153.08/GBP131.31 at the time of this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally fine hand study, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.