Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 31 May 2019

Philips Galle‘s engraving, “The Slaughter of the Fattened Calf", 1562, after Maarten van Heemskerck


Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)

“The Slaughter of the Fattened Calf", 1562, plate 5 from the series of six numbered engravings, “The Parable of the Prodigal Son”, after Maarten van Heemskerck (1498–1574), published by Hieronymus Cock (aka Jérome Cock) (c1510–1570) in Antwerp.

Engraving printed with a warm black ink on fine laid paper trimmed with narrow margins around the image borderline and below the text lines and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 21 x 25.4 cm; (image borderline) 19.7 x 25 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “H Cock excu 5”.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (centre) "Pater illum ... sunt"; (right) "MHemskerck inuen- / P. galle fe."
State: ii (of iv) before the change of publisher from Hieronymus Cock to Theodoor Galle (see the BM copy of a state iii impression BM no. 1955,1008.15).

TIB 5601.031:5 (Walter L Strauss & Arno Dolders [eds.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, New York, Abaris Books, p. 118, cat. no. .031:5); New Hollstein Dutch 156-2(4) (Galle) (Manfred Sellink [comp. & ed.] 2001, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, Part 2, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision, p. 28, cat. 152–157); New Hollstein Dutch 364 (Heemskerck) (Ilja M Veldman 1993–94, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts 1450-1700: Maarten van Heemskerck”, Roosendaal, Koninklijke Van Poll, cat. 360–365); Riggs 1977 126 (Timothy Riggs 1977, “Hieronymus Cock, Printmaker and Publisher”, New York, Garland Press, 1977).

See also Barbara Haeger’s journal article, “Philips Galle's engravings after Maarten van Heemskerck's ‘Parable of the Prodigal Son’" in “Oud Holland”, vol. 102, no. 2, pp. 127–140: https://www.jstor.org/stable/42717512?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(transl.) “In honor of the return of the prodigal son, a fattened calf is slaughtered. The prodigal son dances with the guests in the courtyard. A long table is ready for the banquet.”

See also the description offered by the British Museum

Condition: richly inked and near faultless lifetime impression in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, stains or foxing). The sheet is trimmed near the image borderline with the text line retained and is laid onto a support of conservator’s fine archival/millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this superb lifetime impression of this rare engraving, executed only 21 years after Michelangelo completed his fresco, “The Last Judgement” and 93 years before Rembrandt executed his famous oil painting, “The Slaughtered Ox” (1655)—perhaps this print even inspired Rembrandt!—for the total cost of AU$272 (currently US$180.53/EUR160.58/GBP139.47 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this fascinating print illustrating the verses from Luke 15:11–32 where the son who had squandered half of his father’s estate returned in shame only to be received by his father with the excited exclamation: “Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. Bring the fattened calf and kill it. Let’s have a feast and celebrate. For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.” (NIV), please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Thursday, 30 May 2019

Raffaele Albertolli's aquatint, “Eagle and Snake on a Laurel wreath”, 1793


Raffaele Albertolli (1770–1812)

“Eagle and Snake on a Laurel Wreath” (descriptive title only), 1793, plate 11 (“Tav. XI”) in the series of 20 plates (with the addition of a title and dedication plate to Lodovico Galeazzo Busca Arconati Visconti, marchese di Lomagna) after Giocondo Albertolli (1742–1839) in “Miscellanea per i giovani studiosi del disegno .... Parte terza” (Miscellanea for young scholars of drawing .... Third part), 1796, published by Giocondo Albertolli in Milan, page 26.

(This book is available to view online or to download free of charge from archive.org which also offers detailed information about the publication:

Aquatint with dot roulette etching printed with sanguine coloured ink on heavy laid paper with full margins as published.
Size: (sheet) 58 x 45 cm; (plate) 32 x 38 cm.
Numbered on plate at upper right: “Tav.XI.”
Lettered on plate along the lower edge: (left) “Giocondo Albertolli inc.e dis. 1793”; (right) “Raffaelo Albertolli inc.”

Condition: crisp, richly inked and near faultless impression with generous margins (as published). There is a light wave (cockle) to the left edge and the sheet is cut unevenly on the left, otherwise the sheet is in an excellent/museum quality condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use).

I am selling this large and magnificent aquatint of an eagle engaging with a snake—I think that they are about to attack each other!—for AU$380 (currently US$263.50/EUR236.60/GBP208.48 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this stunningly beautiful and lifetime impression dated on the plate, “1793”, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Wednesday, 29 May 2019

Sebald Beham's woodcut, “The Betrayal”, 1535


Sebald Beham (aka Sebald Peham; Hans Sebald Beham) (1500–1550)

Note: there are inconsistencies signifying that this may be a deceptive copy (e.g. the complete framing edge to this impression rather than the breaks to the image borderline as shown in the BM copy [1853,0312.250] which could be infilled “improvements” made by a past restorer who filled in the gaps or simply that this is an early impression before the detoriation of the framing edge).

“The Betrayal”, 1535, from the series of eight plates, “The Passion”.

The Curator of the British Museum offers the following insight about the series:
“Beham initially produced six woodcuts for this series in 1521 and 1522. He added the remaining two (the Betrayal and Christ before Caiaphas) in 1535” (BM no. 1853,0709.87).

Woodcut on laid paper with narrow margins and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 13.1 x 8.9 cm; (image borderline) 12.8 x 8.6 cm.
Signed with the artist's monogram and dated in the upper-right corner, “1535 / HSB”.

TIB 15(8).86(233) (Robert A Koch [ed.] 1978, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Early German Masters” vol. 15, New York, Abaris Books, p. 174);  Bartsch VIII.233.86; Pauli 1901-11 820 (Gustav Pauli 1901, “Hans Sebald Beham: Ein Kritisches Verzeichniss seiner Kupferstiche Radirungen und Holzschnitte”, 5 vols, Strasburg); Dodgson 1903, 1911 I.456.94 (Campbell Dodgson 1903, “Catalogue of Early German and Flemish Woodcuts in the Bristish Museum”, 2 vols, London, British Museum Trustees); Hollstein 820.

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The Betrayal; Christ surrounded by a group of soldiers, in the foreground St Peter striking Malchus with a knife. 1535 Woodcut”

Condition: crisp impression printed with slightly grey ink (compared to the impressions in the BM and TIB) with narrow margins. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains) and is laid on a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this exceptionally rare woodcut by one of the most famous of the early German masters for the total price of AU$480 (currently US$332.34/EUR298.21/GBP263.19 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this 16th century woodcut executed in the same year that Michelangelo started work on his fresco, “The Last Judgement”, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.




 



 

Agostino Carracci's engraving, ”A Satyr Approaching a Sleeping Nymph", c1590–95


Agostino Carracci (1557–1602)

”A Satyr Approaching a Sleeping Nymph” (aka “Un Satyre surprenant une Nymphe endormie” [Bartsch title]), c1590–95, from the series of fifteen plates, “Lascivie”.
Engraving on buff-coloured laid paper trimmed unevenly with narrow margins around the platmark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet trimmed unevenly) 16.4 x 11.1 cm; (plate) 15.6 x 10.8 cm; (image borderline) 15.4 x 10.3 cm.
State i (of i) A late impression (18th century) of the only state.

TIB 39(18).128(108) (Diane deGrazia Bohlin [ed.] 1980, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Italian Masters of the Sixteenth Century” vol. 39, New York, Abaris Books, p. 170); Bartsch: XVIII, 108.128; Bohlin 1979 184 (Diane deGrazia Bohlin 1979, “Prints and related drawings by the Carracci family”, Washington, National Gallery of Art, p. 298).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“A satyr approaching a sleeping nymph; a nymph asleep to right under a tree lying on drapery, with a satyr approaching from left in shadow, his finger to his mouth.”

Michael Bury (2001) in “The Print in Italy 1550–1620”, published by The British Museum Press offers the following insight into the series, “Lascivie”, of which this print is a part:
 “Explicitly erotic prints are known to have been produced from the fifteenth century on. The survival rate will have been particularly low because of the likelihood that they would be destroyed in outbreaks of moralizing. The most famous sixteenth-century example is the series of “I Modi” or the “Positions”, engraved by Marcantonio Raimondi, of which only a few mutilated fragments remain …. The prints which have conventionally been seen as forming Agostino's “Lascivie” are on the whole less explicitly sexual than Marcantonio's and they represent biblical or mythological subjects, which give them an additional dimension of meaning” (p. 196).

Condition: well-printed but slightly grey impression (clearly a late impression) trimmed with narrow margins around the platemark. The sheet is in near pristine condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use) and is laid on a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

Note that this is the second impression of this print that I have posted (the previous print has been sold).

I am selling this sensitively executed engraving that is seldom seen on the art market for the total price of AU$380 (currently US$262.88/EUR235.60/GBP207.96 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this 16th century engraving that would have been at the time highly erotic and kept under lock and key, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print is available for purchase










Tuesday, 28 May 2019

Gustave Greux's etching, “Porte en Bronze de la Sacriste”, 1880/81, after Jacopo Sansovino


Gustave Greux (aka Marie Gustave Greux) (1838–1919)
Porte en Bronze de la Sacriste”, 1880/81, after the bronze door to the sacristy in the Basilica of San Marco (Venice), sculpted by Jacopo Sansovino (aka Jacopo Tatti) (14861570). This is either a proof impression before lettering with publication details for “L’Art” and printing by François Liénard (fl.c.1860s–1880s) or an impression with the publication details erased. Note: there is a minute trace of lettering above the image borderline, but there is no trace of the publication or the printer’s name below the image borderline.
Etching on ivory coloured laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 39.8 x 27.9 cm; (plate) 32.9 x 19.6 cm; (image borderline) 28.9 x 15.5 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Sansovino, sc”; (centre) “PORTE EN BRONZE DE LA SACRISTE”; (right) “Greux, aquaf”.

Proof without the publication details for “L’Art” (viz. below the image borderline at left, “L'Art” and at right, “F.s Liénard Imp. Paris”, and above the image borderline, “Basilique de Saint Marc à Venice”).

IFF 20? (Département des Estampes 1930, “Inventaire du Fonds, Français: graveurs du XVIIe siècle”, Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print in its published state:
“The bronze relief executed by Jacopo Sansovino for the sacristy door in the basilica of San Marco, Venice; with two large scenes showing the Entombment and the Resurrection, surrounded by smaller reliefs representings Evangelists in niches, reclining prophets, putti and bust portraits; published in 'L'Art'”

Condition: richly inked and faultless impression with generous margins. There is a small (5 mm) closed tear in the lower margin otherwise the sheet is in a near pristine condition (i.e. there are no holes, folds, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use) and laid on a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this masterpiece of nineteenth century etching—so finely executed that it resembles a photograph—for the total price of AU$186 (currently US$128.71/EUR114.95/GBP101.62 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this incredibly fine rendering of Sansovino’s famous bronze door, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold