Thursday, 16 March 2017

Adriaen Collaert’s (?) engraving of hawk trapping, 1582, after Hans Bol


(after?) Adriaen Collaert (c.1560–1618)
(The curator of the British Museum advises: “Attributed to an anonymous engraver by New Hollstein (not catalogued with Adriaen Collaert).”

Plate 26: “Catching Hawks”, 1582, after Hans Bol (aka Jan Bol) (1534–93), from the series of 48 engravings, “Venationis, piscationis, et aucupii typi” (Hunting, Fishing and Fowling Scenes), published by Philips Galle (1537–1612)

Engraving on laid paper trimmed close to the plate mark and lined onto a conservator’s support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 8 x 21.8 cm

Lettered "Aucupe sic verso, fallaci Buteo visco/Inclusis capitur vel mure, aut virmine rana."; numbered "26"; typewritten translation: "A mouse or a frog having been enclosed in a wicker-work snare, the hawk is thus caught with treacherous bird lime, the fowler having turned himself away from view."

Hollstein 110-163 (after Hans Bol); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) undescribed (The Collaert Dynasty)

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Three men hide behind the clump of bare trees at centre, and another hides at far left, watching over the wicker traps they have set and baited; a hawk approaches the trap at left; at top right, a bird has taken off with a trap, and is being pulled in by one of the men at centre; in the background chickens in a field and several buildings with thatched rooves, as well as a castle and church; after Hans Bol Engraving” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3262800&partId=1&searchText=1923,0306.1.1.+26&page=1)

Condition: crisp impression in excellent condition but with a few printer’s creases. The sheet is trimmed close to the platemark and is lined onto a conservator’s support sheet.

I am selling this historically important visual document showing how hawks were once trapped, for AU$280 in total (currently US$215.47/EUR200/GBP174.20 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this wide panoramic view of a 16th century landscape filled with intriguing incidents, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold





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