Monday, 11 July 2016

Jean-Baptiste Lucien (attributed) crayon-manner stippled engravings after Jacques François Chereau


Unidentified artist but most probably Jean-Baptiste Lucien (c.1748–1806) after the design by André-Louis Caillouet (c.1778–1817), published by Jacques François Chereau (1742–94).
(Note that the attribution to Jean-Baptiste Lucien and the circa dating is based entirely on the similarity of these prints to the work of Lucien and his publication of crayon manner ornamental designs.)
(upper image) “Plate 56”, c.1780, (sheet) 25 x 34 cm, (plate) 23.8 x 31.1 cm
(lower image) “Plate 71”, c.1780, (sheet) 25 x 34 cm, (plate) 23 x 29.8 cm
Crayon-manner stippled engravings printed in sanguine ink on fine laid paper.
The National Gallery of Art offers the following description of the crayon manner printing process
“Chalk manner (also called crayon manner) is a printmaking technique that imitates the appearance of chalk lines. … Special toothed tools—roulettes, mattoirs (punches), champignons (literally, "mushrooms"), and the like—were used to create dotted patterns on the plate that suggest the grainy appearance of chalk strokes on paper.” (https://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/clrflimpr-tech.shtm)
Lettered with the plate numbers (upper left) and copyright “Privilége du Roȉ”(lower left)

Condition: prints are strong impressions with margins in very good condition for their age (i.e. the sheets have no tears, stains, holes, folds or foxing).

I am selling both of these original crayon-manner stippled engravings for the total cost of AU$128 (currently US$111.93/EUR101.45/GBP86.51 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this pair of beautiful ornamental designs, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










If my attribution of these prints to a folio by Jean-Baptiste Lucien is correct, then the following information offered by The Metropolitan Museum is interesting:
“The publisher Chéreau advertised the work as being in preparation as early as 1778 … : [Google Translation from French] 'Now etched in this way [in imitation of Crayon], a significant result of the Drawings of ornaments from the most beautiful monuments of Rome, this suite will contain rosettes, the friezes, the Capitals, & c. & Will be updated by notebooks of different sizes & at various prices. It will form a very interesting volume useful to artists. The first notebooks [to be published] sometime in 1778.’” (See the original French text at: http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/712263)

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