Monday, 25 July 2016

Karel Dujardin’s etching, “Mule with a Bell”


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Karel Dujardin  (aka Carel Dujardin,; Carel du Jardin; Karel Du Jardin; Bokkebaart) (1626 –78)
“Le Mulet aux Clochettes” [Mule with a Bell], 1653
Size: (sheet) 19.7 x 16.2 cm
Etching on laid paper trimmed on, or within, the platemark
Lettered in lower margin: "K. DV. IARDIN.1653 fe". With the number 29 in the lower right corner.
Bartsch 1.182.29; Hollstein 29.II
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
The hinny with the little bell. Landscape with a mule standing at centre, in profile to right, wearing a halter from which two bells hang, two other asses resting in right background, trees enclosed within a straw fence beyond; second state with number. 1653” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1617819&partId=1&searchText=Dujardin+mule&page=1)

Condition: crisp impression trimmed on, or within, the platemark. The sheet is in very good condition for its age (i.e. there are no tears, folds or holes), but there are a few scattered dots and there are remnants of mounting hinges (verso).

I am selling this well-preserved original Dujardin etching for the total cost of AU$164 (currently US$122.76/EUR111.67/GBP93.48 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this remarkable print showcasing Dujardin’s skill in representing light, space and subtle differences of texture, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


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Dujardin is famous for his “warts and all” representations of rural life—sheep and cows pissing and pooping accompanied by flies—he is also remembered as a true master of suggesting light, space and mimetic treatments of a full range of textures. For example, note how Dujardin describes the contours of the mule in the foreground (actually a hinny rather than a mule) using only line while simultaneously expressing the surface textures of the mule’s hair. Note also how Dujardin’s treatment of the foreground mule is quite different from his rendering of the mules further back and how well he suggests the spatial distance separating them. Such skill is rare and is the hallmark of great artist.




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