Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Joachim von Sandrart’s engraving, “Satyrvs et Silenvs”, 1679


Joachim von Sandrart (1606–88)
“Satyrvs et Silenvs” (Satyrs and Silenus), 1679, published in "Teutsche Academie", Nuremberg (see vol. 2 [sculpture], plate 00 [after p. 2]. Sandrart.net offers an online view of all the volumes of “Teutsche Academie” (see http://ta.sandrart.net/en/) and details about the print (see http://ta.sandrart.net/-artwork-773).

Engraving on fine laid paper with margins as published.
(sheet) 37.4 x 24.7 cm; (plate) 32.1 x 22.3 cm; (image borderline) 30.9 x 21.2 cm
Lettered above the image borderline: (left) “SATYRVS et SILENVS”; (right) “00.”

Condition: crisp and well-inked impression with margins as published and in execellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, abrasions, folds or foxing but there is a very pale stain at the lower centre margin).

I am selling this large and remarkably well-preserved engraving by one of the most famous of the German old masters—indeed his contribution of creating the first German encyclopaedic treatise on the history of art has earned him the descriptive title of the “German Vasari”—for AU$161 (currently US$127.83/EUR109.62/GBP97.98 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this image of an idyllic scene with the god, Pan, resting contentedly with a quizzical gin below an armless and legless sculpture of Silenus—the unfinished sculpture, “Silen Mattei”, from the Palazzo Mattei di Giove in Rome (?)—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


This print is part of the first major German book on art: "Teutsche Academie" published in 1679. Other plates in the three and later expanded to eight volumes of the book offer formal illustrations of historically significant sculptures and architectural features, but this engraving goes beyond such academic concerns by presenting a very relaxed Pan grinning in a state of reverie beneath a literally legless sculpture of Silenus—the most drunken of the followers of Dionysus.







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