Thursday, 12 April 2018

Etching by Jan Ruijscher and Anthonie Waterloo, “Entrance to the Wood”, c1640


Jan Ruijscher (aka Jan Ruyscher; Johannes Ruijscher; Johannes Ruisscher; Johannes Ruischer; Johannes Rauscher) (c1625–c1675) and Anthonie Waterloo (1610–1690)

“Entrance to the Wood” (TIB title), c1660 (BM 1640–75), third state impression showing reworking of Ruijscher’s design by Waterloo and published by Cornelis Danckerts (II).

Etching on laid paper with small margins and lined on a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 10.2 x 16.3 cm; (plate) 9.5 x 15.5 cm; (image borderline) 8.5 x 14.5 cm
Inscribed on the plate: (upper-right corner) “12”
State iii (of iv) with the addition of the number 12. Note: TIB advises that there “seems to be no clear evidence for a state four, in which the number is removed” (TIB, vol. 2, Commentary Part 1, .019. S2, p. 27).

TIB 2 (2). 19 (27) (Mark Carter Leach & Peter Morse [eds.] 1978, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists”, vol. 2, Abaris Books, New York, p. 18); Bartsch II.27.19; Hollstein 10.III (Ruisscher); Hollstein 19.III (Waterloo).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The entrance to a wood; a country road leading into a dense forest at left; a town amidst trees in right background.”

See also the description of this print (titled “Hilly landscape with trees”) at the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: crisp, well-inked and well-printed impression with small margins. The upper-left corner is restored to the point that the mending is almost invisible and there are a few speck stains, otherwise the print is in excellent condition. The sheet is laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this important collaboratively executed old master etching for AU$183 in total (currently US$141.90/EUR114.7/GBP100.04 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this rare etching showing a transition from white trees to black trees, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


This is a print where the state (i.e. a technical term for a stage in a sequence of alterations to a printing plate) is very important. The reason is that in the first state this etching was completely the work of Jan Ruijscher—arguably a pupil of Rembrandt in the mid-1640s—and it was published by Anthonie Waterloo—an autodidact. In the second state, Waterloo reworked Ruijscher’s design with alterations that Waterloo believed were needed. In the third state, which this impression showcases, the plate is inscribed with the number, “12”, completing the changes to Ruijscher’s composition.

Regarding the changes that Waterloo made to Ruijscher’s design, TIB offers the following account:
“Frameline redrawn heavy and unbroken. Light areas burnished in the foliage … [TIB’s description is very detailed and continues with the advice that these] are deliberate changes, not wear. Two small white spots at the left margin … [TIB gives precise locations] are covered with shading. The clouds and the buildings at the right appear lighter, but this is the result of wear only” (TIB, vol. 2, Commentary Part 1, .019. S2, p. 27). 







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