Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 10 July 2020

Philips Galle’s engraving, “Siege of Camolia by Emperor Charles V and Cosimo Medici”, c1582, after Jan van der Straet


Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus; Philippus Galle) (1537–1612)

“Siege of Camolia by Emperor Charles V and Cosimo Medici” (aka “Belegering van Siena”), c1582, published by Philips Galle in Antewerp in 1583 from the series of twenty-one engravings (including the frontispiece), “Mediceae Familiae Rerum Feliciter Gestarum Victoriae et Triumphi“ (aka “The History of the Medici”), with privilege by Philip II (king of Spain), after the design by Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Johannes Stradanus; Jan van der Straeten; Giovanni Statenensis; Giovanni Stradano; Giovanni della Strada) (1523–1605).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following details about the publication of the series of plates in which this print features:
(Transl.) “This series with representations about the family history of the 'de Medici family consists of three series. Some of the prints were published in 1577. The last four plates are dated 1582. The title page was added later and is dated 1583”

This print may be viewed in its context with the other plates as published in 1583 at Archive.org—be certain to click to the print before this engraving in the series to see Hendrick Goltzius’ engraving to enable comparison of engraving techniques with Galle’s print:

Engraving on laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 22.1 x 30.4 cm.  
Inscribed on plate within image: (upper left of centre) “CAMOLIA”; (upper right of centre) ”SENA”; (lower left) “I”; (lower left of centre) “Johan. Strada./ :nus. inventor./ Phls. Galle fecit”.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Cum privilegio Regis”; (centre in two lines in Latin) “Caroli V Caesaris, …/ ... et presidio Nudant'.
State i (of ii)

TIB 5601.104:44 (Arno Dolders [ed.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, New York, Abaris Books, p. 388, cat. no. [5601].102:5); New Hollstein Dutch 492-1 (2) (Manfred Sellink & Marjolein Leesberg [comp.] 2001, “The New Hollstein : Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, Rotterdam, Sound and Vision, p. 255; p. 299 [ill.], cat. no. 492).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate numbered 1: the battle of Camollia and Siena; night scene; the troops of Charles V and Cosimo de' Medici, seen from behind, laying siege to Camollia and Siena, seen in the background, to left and right respectively”

See also the description of this print offered by the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: well-printed early/lifetime impression showing no sign of wear to the printing plate, trimmed along the plate mark and laid onto a support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. The sheet is in an excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this fascinating 16th century engraving of nightime army manoeuvres showing Cosimo de 'Medici’s army in 1555 heading towards Siena—note the name, ”SENA”, inscribed right-of-centre in the sky—set against the distant siege of Camolia—the name, “CAMOLIA”, is inscribed in the sky left-of-centre—for AU$323 (currently US$224.61/EUR198.83/GBP178.01 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this marvellous and very rare engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Thursday, 9 July 2020

Unidentified engraver after Jan Sadeler I & Maarten de Vos, “Magnificat: The Virgin Surrounded by Music-Making Angels”, c1585–1643


Unidentified engraver from the circle of Jan Sadeler I (aka Johannes Sadeler; Johann Sadeler) (1550–1600)

“Magnificat: The Virgin Surrounded by Music-Making Angels”, c1585–1643, in reverse after Jan Sadeler I’s engraving (c1585) and after Maarten de Vos’ (aka Marten de Vos; Maerten de Vos) (1532–1603) design featuring the sheet music, “Chants de la Vierge (Luc 1, v.46)” (Songs of the Virgin [Luke 1, v.46]), by the Flemish singer and composer, Cornelis Verdonck (1563–1625), published in Antwerp in 1643 by Claes Jansz. Visscher (aka Piscator; Nicolaes Jansz Visscher) (1587–1652) as plate 2 in “Theatrum Biblicum.”

Engraving on laid paper with a small margin around the platemark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 22.6 x 30.5 cm; (plate) 21 x 29 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (upper centre) the Tetragrammaton (the name of God in square script Hebrew); (lower centre) “Luce I. vers. 46./ COELICOLVM REGI MERITAS DE PROMITE LAVDES/ NAMQ[ue]  PIA DOMINVM VENERARI LAVDE DECORVM EST Psal. 147.”; (lower right) “M.de.Vos in […] Visscher excu. 2”.

TIB 7001.264 CI (Isabelle de Ramaix 2001, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Johan Sadeler I”, vol. 70, Part 2 [Supplement], New York, Abaris Books, p. 62, cat. no. [7001 Johan Sadeler I Fecit] .264 CI).

Condition: well-printed impression (showing no sign of wear to the printing plate) with a small margin around the platemark and laid onto a support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. Beyond a closed tear (almost invisible) in the lower margin, the sheet is in an excellent condition (i.e. there are no holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this remarkable engraving featuring angels playing music—note that the two angels on the left are playing a flute and viol while the two angels on the right play a cornett and viol while two angels further back hold the music, “Songs of the Virgin [Luke 1, v.46]), following the score composed by the contemporary Flemish musician of the time, Cornelis Verdonck—for AU$348 (currently US$243.18/EUR213.97/GBP192.49 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this fascinating engraving of angels making music, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Wednesday, 8 July 2020

François Pierdon’s etching, “Les Bords de la Seine à Boulogne, île de Billancourt”, 1870


François Pierdon (1821–1904)

“Les Bords de la Seine à Boulogne, île de Billancourt” (The Banks of the Seine at Boulogne, Billancourt Island), 1870, proof before lettering, printed and published in 1871 by Cadart & Luce (fl.1867–1871), as plate 123 in the third volume of “L'Illustration nouvelle par une société de peintres-graveurs à l'eau-forte” (1870–1871), in Paris.

The Hamburger Kunsthalle (Kupferstichkabinett) offers details about the publication of this print:

According to the brief discussion of Pierdon’s etchings in Henri Béraldi’s (1885-92) “Les Graveurs du 19e Siecle; Guide de L'Amateur D'Estampes Modernes”, vol. 10, p. 123, this print was executed after one of Pierdon’s paintings (see p. 123), but I have been unable to locate this painting.

Etching on laid paper with wide margins.
Size: (sheet) 30.4 x 37.7 cm; (plate) 15.7 x 23.8 cm; (image borderline) 13.7 x 22.3 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left corner) “F. Pierdon sc”.

Condition: richly inked and faultlessly printed proof-state impression with generously wide margins in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains, foxing or signs of use, but there is minor uneven age-toning to the margins).

I am selling this seldom seen etching on the art market—especially a proof-state impression before lettering for publication by an artist who did remarkably few etchings!—for AU$213 (currently US$147.96/EUR131.05/GBP118.04 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this superb etching of a simple rural home set on the banks of the Seine and partly concealed by a screen of trees—an etching that exemplifies the interest of many French artists of the late 1800s with the effects of sparkling sunlight captured from direct observation in the field—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold












Tuesday, 7 July 2020

Hendrik Bary’s engraving, “Spring and Autumn”, c1670, after Anthony van Dyck


Hendrik Bary (aka Hendrick Barij) (1640–1707)

“Spring and Autumn” (aka “Two Children Playing: Spring and Autumn” [Twee Spelende Kinderen: Lente en Herfst]; “Personification of Spring and Autumn”), c1670 (1657–1677), after a painting by Anthony van Dyck (aka Anthony van Dijck; Antoon van Dijk; Anton van Dyck) (1599–1641), published by Nicolaes Visscher II (aka Nicolai Vischer; Claes Claesz Visscher; Nicolaas Visscher) (1649–1702) and Gerard Valck (aka Gerard Valk) (1651/52-1726) in Amsterdam.

Engraving on laid paper with a small margin around the platemark, backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 29.9 x 24.5 cm; (plate) 28.9 x 24 cm; (image borderline) 25.4 x 23.5 cm.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “A. van Dyck pinxit”; (centre) "De lieve Lente wil ons Schoone bloemen geven./ De Oegst schenkt nutter vrucht. men kan van reuk niet leven./ ex Formis Nicolai Visscher/ Cum Privelegio Ordinum Hollandiæ & West-Frisiæ. Nunc apud Ger. Valk."; (left) HBary Sculp.”
State iii (of iii) with the addresses of the publishers.

Hollstein 7 (Bary); New Hollstein 627 (van Dyck)

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(Transl.) “Two children playing, left Autumn with a fruit and corn, right Spring with a wreath of flowers [in his hair]. Under the image a verse of two lines in Dutch”

See also the description of this print by the British Museum:

Condition: near faultless, richly inked impression with a small margin around the platemark and laid onto a support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. The sheet is in an excellent/museum-quality condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this very beautiful engraving featuring children playing in an allegory of the seasons in which “Sweet Spring wants to give us beautiful flowers. The harvest … more fruit”, for AU$356 (currently US$247.24/EUR218.95/GBP198.07 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this very fine engraving—it is such a strong impression that the lines show no sign of wear to the printing plate suggesting that it must be an early impression!—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Monday, 6 July 2020

Jules Jacquemart’s etching, “La mouche et l'écureuil (fable à faire)”, 1862


Jules Jacquemart (aka Jules Ferdinand Jacquemart) (1837–1880)

La mouche et l'écureuil (fable à faire)” [BM title] (aka “L’Écurueil  et la Mouche?” [inscribed on plate]), 1862, printed by Auguste Delâtre (aka Auguste Marie Delâtre) (1822–1907) and published in Paris by A. Cadart & F. Chevalier (fl.1861–1863) as plate 34 in the Society of Aquafortistes’ 1862–63 portfolio, “Eaux-Fortes Modernes.”

Regarding the curiously interesting subject, the distinguised print dealers, C & J Goodfriend, offer the following proposal: “Is it another form of a Vanitas? Or was he [Jacquemart] simply interested in delineating the textures and colors of the fur and a dead squirrel gave a far better opportunity than a live one? But then, why the fly? The ultimate question is: what is the significance of the question mark at the end of the title? Or is that a contribution of the typesetter – who didn’t know how to spell L’Écureuil?” (http://www.drawingsandprints.com/CurrentExhibition/detail.cfm?ExhibitionID=11&Exhibition=42).

Etching cream-coloured chine collé on thick wove paper with wide margins.
Size: (sheet) 33.2 x 50.7 cm; (plate) 24.2 x 31.9 cm; (chine collé/image borderline) 19.1 x 30.7 cm.
Numbered on plate within the image borderline (upper-right) “34”.
Lettered on plate below the image borderline (left)  “J. Jacquemart sculpt.”; (centre) “L’ÉCURUEIL ET LA MOUCHE?/ Paris Publié par A. CADART & F. CHEVALIER, Éditeurs, Rue Richelieu, 66.”; (right) “Imp. Delâtre, St. Jacques, 303, Paris.”
State iv (of iv) with the addition of the publication details.

Béraldi 330 (Vol. IX); Bailly-Herzberg 34; Gonse 330

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“A (dead?) squirrel stretched out on a floor, and on the right a fly”

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression in very good condition but there are spots of foxing (e.g. a light brown spot and smaller flecks in the lower margin and more spots visible verso).

I am selling this superb etching that invites the idea that this is not simply a sensitively rendered study of a squirrel and a fly, but rather a visual prompt to contemplate the possible relationships of the dead squirrel with a fly—for example, is the relaionship about the inevitability of death (i.e. a vanitas image)? or is the relationship about perceiving life within death?—for AU$330 (currently US$229.79/EUR203.55/GBP183.88 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this technically outstanding and visually intriguing still-life of a squirrel—perhaps a Eurasian red squirrel?— seemingly animated in its death accompanied by a housefly, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.