Gallery of prints for sale

Wednesday, 14 April 2021

Jean Baptiste Tilliard & Louis Lafitte, “Hercules Capturing the Mares of Diomedes”, c1797, after Charles Le Brun

(Engraver) Jean Baptiste Tilliard (1740–1813) & (etcher) Louis Lafitte (1770–1828)

“Hercules Capturing the Mares of Diomedes”, (aka “Hercule Assommant les Chevaux de Diomede”), c1797 (1786–1808), in reverse after the design of Charles Le Brun’s (aka Charles Lebrun) (1619–1690) painting, “Hercules Vanquishing Diomedes”, c1640, in the Castle Museum and Art Gallery, Nottingham (inv. NCM 1893–52) (see the painting and preliminary studies: https://nottinghammuseums.org.uk/oil-painting-hercules-vanquishing-diomedes-by-charles-le-brun/;https://webmuseo.com/ws/musee-bonnat-helleu/app/collection/record/245; https://fr.wahooart.com/@@/8DP53F-Charles-Le-Brun-Hercule-terrassant-Diom%C3%A8de), published in Paris in 1786 by Jacques Couché in, “Galerie du Palais Royal: gravée d'après les tableaux des differentes ecoles qui la composent: avec un abrégé de la vie des peintres & une description historique de chaque tableau” (Gallery of the Royal Palace: engraved after the paintings of the different schools which compose it: with an abridgment of the life of the painters & a historical description of each painting) (see this print in its context in the publication: https://archive.org/details/gri_33125008483923/page/n156/mode/2up).

The Curator of the British Museum offers the following information regarding the series in which this print features, “Galerie du Palais Royal”:

“… a set reproducing 354 works from the collection of the Duke of Orléans, published by Jacques Couché (who directed the project with Bouillard; see Inventaire du Fonds Français for Jacques couché, cat. No.50, for article on the series) from 1786 to 1808.

The plates were issued by series of 6, every 3 months, and each of them was accompanied by a text, engraved on the same plate as the reproduction; the first six plates were published on 15 February 1786 and advertised in 'Affiches, Annonce et Avis divers', 25 February. Disrupted and interrupted by the Revolution, the publication resumed in 1808 (volumes II and II). At some point, reflecting the changes occurring in France at the time, the series' title was changed to 'Galerie du Palais Egalité' (the name given to the Palais Royal during the Revolution, and an allusion to its owner, Philippe Egalité). It is also sometimes referred to as 'Galerie du Palais d'Orléans', or 'Galerie du Duc d'Orléans'” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1837-0408-317).

Engraving with etching on wove paper trimmed around the image borderline and retaining the title and publication details (but with loss of lower text in the margin; see https://hvrd.art/o/241081), backed by a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 22.4 x 16 cm; (image borderline) 21.2 x 15.9 cm.

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “'Peint par Ch. le Brun”; (centre) “Gravé à l'Eau forte par Lafitte./ HERCULE ASSOMMANT LES CHEVAUX DE DIOMEDE”; (right) “Terminé äu Burin par J. B. Tilliard.”

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Hercules and the mares of Diomedes, after Le Brun: the hero stands with his foot placed on one of the mares' head, and prepares to strike a blow with his club; at his feet, a dead man lying on the ground, and human bones; with engraved text below. c.1786/1808 Etching and engraving” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1855-0609-617).

Condition: a richly inked and well-printed impression, trimmed around the image borderline on the top and sides with loss of the text below the title and production details, laid upon a support sheet of fine archival/millennium quality washi paper. The sheet is in excellent condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing.

I am selling this graphically strong engraving (with etching) showing Hercules dispatching the mythological man-eating horses owned by the King of Thrace, Diomedes, for AU$257 (currently US$196.53/EUR164.28/GBP142.78 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this beautifully executed engraving full of action and sparkling with light, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Tuesday, 13 April 2021

Philippe Thomassin’s engraving, “Apotheosis of Mary”, c1615, after Bernardo Castelli

Philippe Thomassin (1562–1622)

Apotheosis of Mary” (aka “Apothéose de Marie”), 1615, after Bernardo Castelli (aka Bernardino Castelli; Bernard Castelli) (1646–1725), with dedication to the Lieutenant Governor of Rome, Count François Trivulce, published by Philippe Thomassin in 1615 (as inscribed on the plate at lower left).

Engraving on laid paper trimmed slightly unevenly with a narrow margin around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 45.4 x 31.3 cm; (image borderline) 43.9 x 31 cm.

Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left on rock) “Cu priuil. Smi Pontificis/ et Superioru licentia”; (lower left on ground) “Bern. Castellus inuen./ Romæ, Phls Thomassinus Sculps. et excud. 1615.”

Lettered on plate below the image borderline: ”ILL MO. COMITI FRANCISCO TRIVVLTIO. VTRIVSQ[ue] SIGNARÆ. REFERENDARIO ET ILLMI. VICARII IN CIVILIB. LOCVMTETI./ D. meO COLENDO. Phls Thomassinus D.D.”

Lifetime impression of the only state.

Bruwaert 310 191 (Edmond Bruwaert 1915, “La vie et les œuvres de Philippe Thomassin, graveur troyen, 1562–1622”, Paris, Société Académique de l'Aube, p.90, cat. no. 310 191; https://archive.org/details/lavieetlesoeuvre00bruwuoft/page/90/mode/2up).

The Société Académique de l'Aube (1876) offers the following description of this print in “Mémoires de la Société d'Agriculture, Sciences et Arts du Département de l'Aube”:

(Transl.) “Apotheosis of Mary. —According to Bernard Castelli. {… ]1615. The Virgin appears in the middle of Heaven, surrounded by angels, and having the moon under her feet.  On land, between the ocean on the left and a city on the right, various emblematic objects.” (p.124; see: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5509735m/f124.image.r=COMITI%20FRANCISCO%20TRIVVLTIO).

For those unfamiliar with the shenanigans of Phillippe Thomassin in his dedication of this very holy image to the Lieutenant Governor of Rome, Count François Trivulce, along with the dedication of another print (“A Holy Family”, after Paul Véronèse), to the public prosecutor, P. M. Cirocchio; Tomassin’s motivation may not have been driven by a completely pure heart. Afterall, at the time of dedicating the prints, Tomassin was engaged in a libel claim against a sub-tenant—the glove maker, Valérien Tetti—who proposed (in my understanding of the case) that Thomassin was prostituting his “lady friend”, Jerômette, “ with the approval of her husband.” (Yikes!) (see Edmond Bruwaert 1915, “La vie et les œuvres de Philippe Thomassin, graveur troyen, 1562–1622”, Paris, Société Académique de l'Aube, pp, 64–5; https://archive.org/details/lavieetlesoeuvre00bruwuoft/page/64/mode/2up).

Condition: an excellent impression but with many restorations and laid upon a support sheet of fine archival/millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this large iconic engraving of the Virgin rising from the temporal world to become divine while blessing viewers with her mercifully compassionate (misericodia) hand gestures, for AU$338 (currently US$257.32/EUR216.10/GBP187.16 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this large engraving exemplifying the Baroque Period style, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Monday, 12 April 2021

(attrib.) Conrad Faber von Kreuznach’s woodcut, “The Battle of Zama”, c1505

 

(attrib.) Conrad Faber von Kreuznach (aka Conrad Faber; Conrad Faber von Creuznach; [formerly] Master of Holzhausen-portraits) (1495–1558)

“The Battle of Zama”—Scipio Africanus (aka Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus) (236–183 BCE) defeating Hannibal in 202 BCE, c1505, woodcut illustration to Titus Livius“The History of Rome” (aka “Ab urbe condita” [from the founding of the City]), initially published in 1505 by Johann Schöffer (1475?–1531) in Mainz, followed by Johann Grüninger (1455–1533) in 1507 in Strasbourg, and later between 1533 to 1546 by Iuonem Schöffer (fl.c1530–c1550) in Mainz with the illustration featuring on page CLXXVIII (178) in “Römische Historien, jetzundt mit ganzem Fleiß besichtigt, verbessert und vermehrt” (Roman histories, now viewed with all diligence, improved and increased) (see: https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_x0lTAAAAcAAJ/page/n396/mode/2up). I apologies if there are inaccuracies in these details.

WorthPoint offers the following marvellous insight into Conrad Faber von Kreuznach’s compositions:

“To depict scenes for the book, Conrad Faber used sketches which he had made during his travels along the Rhine. Thus identifiable towns on the Rhine were used to illustrate sieges and 16th century German dukes represented Roman leaders” (https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/medieval-original-woodcut-1533-conrad-463082236).

Woodcut on fine early laid paper with letterpress fraktur text (recto), trimmed around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 12.1 x 14.5 cm.

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression without significant signs of wear to the printing plate and is laid upon a support sheet of fine archival/millennium quality washi paper. The sheet is in an excellent condition for its considerable age with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this superb woodcut masterpiece from 1505—note the cannon-like wheel-mounted crossbow on the left—for AU$254 (currently US$193.26/EUR162.43/GBP141.15 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this woodcut of extraordinary quality in a museum quality condition, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 










Sunday, 11 April 2021

Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine’s etching, “Young Boy, Facing Right”, 1777 (2nd copy)

Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine (aka Jean Pierre Norblin de la Gordaine) (1745–1830)

“Young Boy, Facing Right”, 1777

Etching on fine laid paper with small margins.

Size: (sheet) 6.3 x 3.8 cm; (plate) 5.3 x 2.6 cm

Signed and dated on plate (partially erased or worn off).

State v

Hillemacher 1848 79.V (Frédéric Hillemacher 1848, “Catalogue des estampes qui composent l'oeuvre de J. P. Norblin”, Paris; Cologne 1989, cat. no. 98).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Standing boy, turned to right, wearing hat and wrapped in cloak in rags; on white ground; fifth state, with head facing front. 1777” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1533917&partId=1&people=113103&peoA=113103-2-60&page=1).

See also the description of this print at the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Rijksmuseum: https://collections.artsmia.org/art/105174/young-boy-facing-right-jean-pierre-norblin-de-la-gourdaine;  http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.158712.

Condition: a richly inked and well-printed impression with small margins (approximately 6 mms). The sheet is in near pristine condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, losses, stains, foxing, or signs of handling.

Note that this is the second copy of this print that I have listed. The earlier copy has been sold.

I am selling this seemingly simple and freely inscribed etching of a young rural boy wearing a high hat and a peasant’s tabard by one of the most important artists of the Enlightenment in Poland for AU$256 (currently US$195.17/EUR163.94/GBP142.39 at the time of posting this print) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this small/miniature masterwork from the 1700s following in the tradition of Rembrandt, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 









Saturday, 10 April 2021

Raphael Morghen’s engraving, “Head of Jupiter”, 1789

Raphael Morghen (aka Raffaello Morghen) (1758–1833)

“Head of Jupiter”—Portrait of Augustus [Octavian], 1789, following the intermediary design by Buenaventura Salesa (1756–1819) after an antique cameo found at Ephesus in 1793.

Frederic Robert Halsey (1885) in his catalogue raisonné for Raphael Morghen offers the following description of this print:

“Engraved at Rome, 1789, from an antique cameo, discovered at Ephesus, and in the possession of the Venetian Senator Giuliani. This cameo was carried off to Paris by Napoleon for the famous Museé Français, but was returned after Napoleon’s downfall in 1815. A head, full face, in a circular medallion, diameter 2⅝ in. The plate was said to have been destroyed; but this is a mistake, as it formed part of the Calcografia Morgheniana which passed into the possession of G. Snell, and it is now owned by Luigi Bardi, Florence. It was engraved for Osservazioni sopra un antico cammeo, rappresentante Giove Egioco, by the learned antiquary Ennio Quirino Visconti, Padova, 1793, 4to. There is an excellent copy by Rosaspina” (p. 66; see https://archive.org/details/raphaelmorghense00hals/page/66/mode/2up).

Engraving on heavy laid paper with wide margins as published.

Size: (sheet) 40.3 x 27.1 cm; (plate) 18.8 x 15.3 cm; (image borderline dia.) 6.8 cm.

Inscribed on plate around the image borderline: (lower left) “Bon. Salesa del.”; (lower right) “Raph. Morghen sculp.”

Lettered on plate in four lines of Latin below the image borderline: (centre) “Juppiter Aegiocus Ephesi nuper effosus/ Extat/ Apud Hieronymum Equitem Julianum/ Patricium Venetum”.

State iv (of iv) with correction of “Zulianum” to “Julianum” and “effosus” to “effossus” (see the first lettered state before changes at the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1843-0513-1116).

Halsey 81iv (Frederic Robert Halsey, 1885, “Raphael Morghen's engraved works being a descriptive catalogue”, New York, G P Putnam’s Sons, p. 66, cat. no. 81iv); Palmerini 142 (Niccolo Palmerini 1824, “Opere d'intaglio del Cav. Raffaello Morghen”, Florence, Niccolo Pagni, cat. no. 142); Nagler 151.

The British Museum offers a description of this print: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1868-0822-93.

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression with generous margins. Beyond minor dustiness to the margins, the sheet is in excellent condition for its considerable age with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing.

I am selling this jewel-like engraving of an antique cameo capturing not only its fine details but also the slight sheen of the cameo’s polished surface, for AU$267 (currently US$203.54/EUR170.97/GBP148.51 at the time of posting this listing) including Express Mail (EMS) postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this remarkably fine engraving—a true masterwork of this very demanding medium—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold