Saturday, 21 May 2016


Honoré Daumier (1808–79)

(left image) “TEMPLE DE LA PAIX: Difficile à remettre à neuf.” [Temple of Peace: Hard to refurbish] Plate 23, from “Actualités” based on the “Le Charivari”, 1869 series news, (sheet) 29.4 x 26 cm, printed by Destouches.

(right image) “LES BEAUX JOURS DE LA VIE: Un monsieur qui veut se donner la satisfaction d'avoir son masque. [The beautiful days of life: A gentleman who wants to give himself the satisfaction of having his mask/facial.], Plate 91 from “Les Bons Bourgeois” published in “Le Charivari”, August 10, 1846, (sheet) 35.3 x 24.5 cm, printed by Aubert et Cie, state iii (of iii), Delteil 1179.

Both prints are original lithographs by Daumier on newsprint paper with typeset printing verso.
Condition: crisp impressions with printed text (verso) in good condition (i.e. no tears or foxing but the sheets have signs of use in terms of light folds and Plate 91 has a light spot stain towards the lower left edge).


I am selling both of the original Daumier lithographs for a total cost of AU$98 (currently US$70.73/EUR63.03/GBP48.75 at the time of posting these prints) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing these original prints by one of the most famous French satirists in the 19th century, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Daumier needs no introduction as an artist as he is one of the most famous satirical illustrators of social events in 19th century France. What makes him such a legend even today is not limited to his incisive insights about social issues, even if I personally chuckle at the alarming image of chap receiving having either a plaster cast made of his head (without the customary straws up the nose) or a full facial by a fiendish looking health worker. He is memorable because he could draw with such ease and with marks where each one is critically important to the meanings expressed. Even the phrasing of each line (i.e. variations of pressure and thickness within a line) are testament to the artist's full engagement of mind and passion in capturing his vision of life around him.

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