Tuesday, 17 May 2016


Alfred Alexandre Delauney (1830–95)
"Fruits and Flowers on a Stone Ledge", 1865, after a painting (1723) by Jan van Huysum (1682–1749), printed by Pierron
Etching on thick wove paper.
Size: (sheet) 38.7 x 29.1 cm; (plate) 36.7 x 25.5 cm; (image) 40 x 32 cm
Lettered below the image borderline with production and publication details: "Jan Van Huysum Pinx. / Delauney Sculp. 1865", "Paris Delauney Editeur 39 Rue de Seine" and "Imp. Pierron, Paris". Beraldi 1885-92 1-40; IFF 4.
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Fruits and flowers on a stone ledge, after Jan van Huysum; on the right, a vase decorated with a female figure.” (http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3358411&partId=1&searchText=Huysum+&page=1)
Condition: Strong, well-inked impression with small margins. The sheet is in good condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, foxing or stains) but there is light surface dustiness.

I am selling this exceptionally fine reproductive etching executed in 1865 after a painting executed by 1723 by Jan van Huysum for the total cost of AU$92 (currently US$66.94/EUR59.32/GBP46.36 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.
If you are interested in purchasing this superb etching exemplifying the highest order of technical skills, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.


This print has been sold


Jan van Huysum's flower-pieces—the technical name for still-life images like this—are more than decoratively charming artworks executed with the highest order of skill, patience and care; they are also layered in meanings. For instance, the portrayed insects, cracked nuts, broken fruit and the few dead flowers scattered through this image are designed to alert introspective sensitive folk about the transience of life—the notion of vanitas.

Even the artist's choice of flowers for this composition are fanciful concoctions. They are chosen to represent the blossoms from all seasons rather than those of a specific season.




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