Tuesday, 6 February 2018

Bernard Romain Julien’s pair of lithographs, “The Charging Chasseur” and “The Wounded Cuirassier”, after Géricault


Bernard Romain Julien (1802–1871)

(left) “The Charging Chasseur” (aka “Officier de chasseur à cheval de la garde impériale chargeant”, 1814–71
(right) “The Wounded Cuirassier” (aka “Le Cuirassier blessé quittant le feu”), 1814–71

Both lithographs are after Théodore Géricault’s (1791–1824) paintings and were printed by François Delarue (fl.1850s–1860s) and published by Ernest Gambart (1814–1902) in Paris.
Colour lithographs printed on heavy wove paper and lined with a support sheet.
Size: (each sheet) 68 x 53 cm
Each lithograph is signed in the plate below the image by the artist and inscribed:  “Imp. Fois. Delarue, Paris”
See a (brief) description of “Le Cuirassier” (“The Charging Chasseur”) at the Rijksmuseum: http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.130348

Condition: both sheets have small tears (addressed with restorations to make them virtually invisible) and each sheet has been laid upon a heavy archival support sheet.

I am selling this pair of huge and magnificently executed lithographs by the famous master lithographer of the 19th century, Bernard Romain Julien, for AU$300 (as a group purchase) (currently US$235.79/EUR190.78/GBP169.68 at the time of posting this listing). Postage for these prints is extra and will be the actual/true cost.

If you are interested in purchasing these monumentally large prints, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy. 



These images are so well known that they are almost icons of nineteenth century art. What makes them special is certainly that they have the capacity to grab attention and invite the imagination to take the viewer into the portrayed reality of the scene. They are also milestones in art history marking the shift from cool objectivity, grand intentions and pictorial cleanliness of Neo-Classical compositions to the dynamic diagonals, emotionally charged marks and intimately personal visions of Romanticism.









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