Gallery of prints for sale

Tuesday, 30 April 2019

Claude Lorrain's etching, “The Flight into Egypt”, 1630–33


Claude Lorrain (aka Claude Gellée; Claude Le Lorrain; Claudio di Lorena) (1600–1682)

“The Flight into Egypt” (aka “Vlucht naar Egypte”; “La fuite en Egypte”), 1630–33, printed from the original plate by McCreery in his 1816 edition of “200 Etchings”.
Etching on wove paper trimmed slightly within the plate mark and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 10.3 x 17 cm.
Inscribed on plate at lower right: “CLAU”.
State iv (of iv)

Blum 1923 2; Mannocci 1988 9; Robert-Dumesnil 1835-71 XI.1; IFF 2
The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“The Flight into Egypt; in a landscape, Virgin and Child on a donkey, led by two angels and followed by Joseph”

See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: although this is a late impression (1816), the lines are richly inked, crisp and well printed. The sheet is in very good condition for its age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains—but there is a small spot on the left side—foxing or signs of use), trimmed slightly within the plate marks (as published by McCreedy) and backed with an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this exceptionally rare etching executed by the one of the most famous of the early landscape artists, for the total cost of AU$333 (currently US$234.90/EUR209.42/GBP180.59 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this original etching by one of the major old masters, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold


Tonight I’m a tad distracted from giving the details about this richly worked print that I’m posting, as there are a few aspects to it that fascinate me. Let me begin …

This is one of Lorrain’s earlier prints and it has the “right” mixture of a novice artist finding his way in terms of stylistic consistency and a struggle with communicating what the print should/could be about as suggested by the title: a biblical illustration focused on portraying the escape of the Holy Family (aided by angels) from King Herod’s edict to have all newly born male children killed.

Regarding my proposal that Lorrain was struggling to find a singular expressive voice in terms of style, I see the mimetic treatment of the treetops in the upper right as rendered with a different mindset to the horizontal strokes rendering the sky and the cleaved rocks in the right foreground. Note also how Lorrain changes his approach from the rather cool formulaic treatment of these rocks to a more sensuous cross-hatched treatment of surface contours of the broken ground shown on the left. Interestingly, even Lorrain’s treatment of the sky reveals changes of stylistic thinking as may be seen in the flurry of burnished adjustments towards the middle of the sky area.

Regarding what I see as a struggle with communicating the biblical story, to my eyes the Holy Family is shown as somewhat “lost” in shadows rather than being given pictorial prominence. This may be a shortfall, but from a personal standpoint, this subordination of the Holy Family allows my eye to read the composition as a cohesive whole—a landscape sparkling with light.









Monday, 29 April 2019

David Kandel's woodcut print, “Rhinoceros”, c1550, after Albrecht Dürer



David Kandel (1520/25–1592/96)

“Rhinoceros”, c1550, after Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) (Meder 273), printed by Heinrich Petri (fl.c.1527–1577), published as the illustration to page 1086, in the first/Latin edition (1550–52) before the German editions of Sebastian Münster’s (1488–1552), “Cosmographia”, in Basle.

Note that the Latin edition is differentiated from the German edition by the woodcut of “an elephant carrying various figures on a large saddle to right, by an anonymous printmaker” (see BM no. 1850,1014.988). I have previously posted another impression of Kandel’s “Rhinoceros” (now sold) from the German edition which features a landscape with a walled city (verso)—my apologies for not investigating which city is portrayed (see https://www.printsandprinciples.com/2018/10/david-kandels-woodcut-rhinoceros-1550.html).

Woodcut with old colouring and letterpress text printed recto and verso and a second woodcut printed verso on fine laid paper backed with support sheet (with a window cut to show the verso woodcut).
Size: (sheet) 13.8 x 19 cm; (woodcut verso partial obscured by support sheet) 6.5 x 10 cm.
Signed with Kandel's monogram of entwined letters (*DK") at lower centre.
Lifetime impression taken from the first Latin edition of "Cosmographia" (1550/2).

Hollstein 10p; Nagler 1858-79 II.1173.5; Bartsch IX.394.17; Meder 273; Schoch/Mende/Scherbaum 241

The British Museum offers a description of this print from the same Latin edition:

Condition: well-printed lifetime impression with old colouring in excellent condition for its considerable age (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing). The sheet is laid onto a support of conservator’s fine archival/millennium quality washi paper cut with a rectangular “window” to enable the woodcut printed verso to be seen. Note that the printing block for this woodcut features a split from the horn to the tail of the rhinoceros and this is an intrinsic part of the print.

I am selling this extremely rare woodcut for AU$350 (currently US$246.84/EUR221.10/GBP190.71 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this superb woodcut with antique colouring after Dürer’s famous “Rhinoceros”, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold



This woodcut by Kandel (1550) after Dürer’s famous “Rhinoceros” (1514) was a plate in a series of 22 illustrations for the enlarged edition of “Cosmographia”—the first publication offering descriptions of the world and, interestingly, the first to feature a map of the Americas—initially published in Basle in 1550 (from which this impression is extracted) and republished another 15 times with German text with the last printing in 1628. The Curator of the British Museum advises that this enlarged edition “contained around 900 illustrations and 40 maps” (see BM no. 1850,1014.972).


For those who may not be familiar with Dürer’s depiction of a rhinoceros—an Indian rhinoceros I understand—the design of the woodcut is based on a sketch made by an unidentified artist when the portrayed rhino was in Lisbon. Essentially, Dürer never had the chance to see this particular animal as the rhino drowned when the ship that was transporting it from Lisbon to Rome became shipwrecked. What Kandel/Dürer have depicted in their illustration of a rhino is consequently a concoction of rhino details and understandably, some are not quite right, such as an “extra” horn on the neck of the animal and the marvellous patterning of spots on its hide.








Sunday, 28 April 2019

Cornelis Galle’s engraving, “Indians catching ducks with pumpkins”, 1578


Cornelis Galle I (1576–1650)

“Indians catching ducks with pumpkins” (aka “Jacht op eenden”; “Hunting Ducks”), 1578, plate 95 from the second series of 104 plates, “Hunting Parties” (aka “Venationes Ferarum, Avium, Piscium” (transl. “With wild beasts, birds, fish”), after Jan van der Straet (aka Joannes Stradanus; Ioannes Stradanus) (1523–1605) published by Cornelis Galle’s son, Ioan Galle (aka Jan Galle; Joannes Galle; Johann Galle; Ioannes Galle; Joan Galle) (1600–1676), in Antwerp.

This plate was added to the original set of 43 engravings executed solely by Philips Galle—Cornelis Galle’s father. Beyond Cornelis Galle, the later plates were executed by the following engravers: A Collaert; J. Collaert; I and C. de Mallery (see http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1619537&partId=1&people=93957&peoA=93957-2-70&page=1 and A Baroni & M Sellink, “Stradanus 1523–1605: Court artist of the Medici”, exh.cat. Groeningemuseum Brugge 2008-2009, Turnhout, 2012, pp.245–58, cat. nos. 32–49).

Engraving on chine collé (China) on fine laid paper with margins from a late printing.
Size: (sheet) 26.5 x 36.2 cm; (plate) 21 x 27.2 cm; (image borderline) 19.3 x 27 cm
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (lower left) “Ioan. Stradanus inuent.”; (lower centre) “Corn. Galle Sculp.”; (lower right) “Ioan. Galle excud.”

Note: the Metropolitan Museum of Art proposes that this plate was executed by Jan Collaert I (c1530–1581) (see https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/393446?&searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=pumpkin&offset=20&rpp=20&pos=35), but this attribution is unlikely as the plate is inscribed “Corn. Galle Sculp.” The Rijksmuseum advises that the engraver is Cornelis Galle.

Numbered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “95.”
Lettered on plate below the image borderline in two columns of two lines of Latin text: “Anserum agreste genus stagnante in aqua capit Indus. / Ipse cucurbità habet. Tec tum caput, illecebrisque // Allicit: esuriens anser visæ inuolat escæ. / Indus pascentem facili capit arte volucrem." (Google transl.: “Of geese in the water, it takes an Indian race of rustics, forms a stagnant lake. / He has a pumpkin. Then head to the roof, the baits // attracts hungry unimaginable gets goose meat. / Indian food to easily capture birds.")
State: iv (of iv) with the change of publisher from Philips Galle to Ioan Galle and change of the plate number.

New Hollstein 485 (Stradanus) (Leesberg Marjolein [comp.] 2008, “The new Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts 1450–1700: Johannes Stradanus”, vol. 3, Amsterdam, Sound and Vision Rijksmuseum, p.184; p.210 [afb.], cat. no. 485).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print from the earlier edition published by Philips Galle:
“Indians catch ducks in a pond. Indians camouflage themselves and hide in the water through a hollowed-out pumpkin. Wild ducks sit on the pumpkins and are easy prey. The print has a Latin caption and is part of a series about hunting scenes.”

Condition: richly inked and near faultless late impression in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing). The sheet is laid onto a support of conservator’s fine archival/millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this superb late impression of this rare engraving, for a total cost of AU$244 (currently US$171.81/EUR154.01GBP133.02 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this fascinating print showing a fascinating way early Indians caught waterfowl—especially ducks—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Saturday, 27 April 2019

Abraham Blooteling & Pieter Stevens van Gunst's engraving, “Plate 99: Innominate with the Ischium”, 1685


Abraham Blooteling (aka Abraham Bloteling; Abraham Blotelingh; Abraham Blootelingh) (1640–1690) and Pieter Stevens van Gunst (aka Pieter van Gunst) (1658/ 59–c1731)

“Plate 99: Innominate with the Ischium”, 1685, after the drawing in the Ecole de Médicine, Paris, by Gerard de Lairesse (1640/41–1711) as plate 99 to Govard Bidloo’s (1649–1713) famous anatomical atlas, “Anatomia humani corporis / Ontleding des menschelyken lichaams", first published by the widow (de Weduwe van Joannes van Someren) (fl. after 1679) of Johan van Someren (1622–1676) in 1685 in Amsterdam.

In previous listings I showcased an impression (now sold) from the 1734 edition published by Jacob van Poolsum (1701–1762) in Utrecht that had 2.5 cm chainlines (rather than the 3 cm chainlines of this print) and on a sheet that is slightly smaller than this print leading me to propose that this impression is from the first edition.

Note that William Cowper (c1666–1709) also published an edition of the prints in 1739; see the description of the controversy about the Cowper edition offered by The Print Collector: http://www.theprintscollector.com/Article/Antique-Medical-Print-FOETUS-ABDOMEN-Cowper-Bidloo-1739.

Engraving on laid paper (3 cm chain-lines) with full margins as published.
Size: (sheet) 50.7 x 35.5 cm; (plate) 44.6 x 27.8 cm.
Numbered on plate at upper right corner: “T. 99.” and indexed, “Fig. 1” and “Fig. 2” and lettered from “A” to “H”.

For information about the Bidloo’s anatomical atlas in which this illustration is a part, see:
Christie’s Auction: Anatomy As Art: The Dean Edell Collection
Rare Prints Gallery
This publication is available to view online or to download free of charge from archive.org

Condition:, crisp and well-printed, faultless impression with minor spots appropriate to the age of the print, otherwise the sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains, foxing or signs of use).

I am selling this large masterpiece of anatomical engraving featuring in its design a sprig of holly and a lidded jar—see my explanation below regarding these elements in the composition—for AU$485 (currently US$341.50/EUR306.12/GBP264.1 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this extraordinary and technically magnificent print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.




Regarding the curiously interesting addition of the sprig of holly and the lidded jar featuring in its design, the flaming Rod of Asclepius (i.e. the rod entwined with a snake wielded by the Greek God of healing and Medicine, Asclepius) holly leaves (symbolic of life) and a skull (symbolic of death), I suspect that the artist addressing the notion of Vanitas (i.e. the impermanence of life) which was a popular theme in Dutch art at the time of the print’s execution—the Dutch Golden Age.









Friday, 26 April 2019

Engraving published by Gerard de Jode, “Second Vision of Ezra: Ezra Comforted by the Angel”, 1585


Unidentified engraver from the school of the southern Netherlands

(Publisher) Gerard de Jode (aka Geeraert de Jode; Gheerde de Jode; Girard de Jode; Gerardo de Jode; Gheraerde de Jode) (1516/17–1591)

“Second Vision of Ezra: Ezra Comforted by the Angel” (aka “Ab angelo consolationem accipit Esdras interpretationeq[ue] a se visæ cognoscit.” [as titled on plate]), 1585, plate 2 from the series of four engravings, “Visions of Ezra” (aka “Van Esdras and Nehemias”), after Maarten de Vos (aka Marten de Vos; Maerten de Vos) (1532–1603), published by Gerard de Jode in 1585 as an illustration to “Thesaurus sacrarum historiaru[m] veteris (et novi) testame[n]ti, elega[n]tissimis imaginibus expressu[m] excelle[n]tissimoru[m] in hac arte viroru[m] opera: nu[n]c primu[m] in luce[m] editus” ([Google transl.] "Treasure of sacred stories old and new, elegant expressed finest pictures of her art works now for the first time to light"), in Amsterdam.

Engraving on fine laid paper backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 24.7 x 33.4 cm; (plate) 20.4 x 29.8 cm; (image borderline) 19.1 x 29.5 cm.
Numbered on plate within the image borderline at lower left: “2”.
Lettered on plate in Latin below the image borderline: “Ab angelo consolationem accipit Esdras interpretationeq[ue] a se visæ cognoscit. 4. Cap. 10.”
State i (of ii) Lifetime impression before the additional numbering signifying the second state (viz. the second number “2” within the image borderline and “25” at the end of the text line).

Hollstein Dutch 163-1(2) (Dieuwke de Hoop Scheffer [ed.] 1996, [Hollstein’s] “Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts ca. 1450–1700: Maarten de Vos [text]”, vol. 44, Rotterdam, Sound & Vision Rijksprentenkabinet, pp. 44-45, cat. no. 163); Mielke 33 (H Mielke 1975, “Antwerpener graphic in the second half of the 16th century. The Thesaurus Veteris Testamenti of Gerard de Jode [1585] and his Artists”, Zeitschrift fur Kunstgeschichte 38, p. 80, cat. no. 33).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(transl.) “The angel Uriel comforts Ezra and helps him to his feet. In addition to Ezra are his vision of the radiant woman Zion. When she disappears, Ezra sees the city being built in the background. Below the image a reference in Latin to the apocryphal Bible text in 4 Ezra 10.”

Condition: richly inked, crisp, near faultless, museum-quality impression with margins in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing), laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper.

I am selling this exceptionally rare lifetime impression glowing with strong contrasts for AU$320 in total (currently US$225.16/EUR202.02/GBP174.38 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this superb engraving exemplifying the period style of Mannerism, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold