Gallery of prints for sale

Saturday, 24 July 2021

Jean Jacques de Boissieu’s etching, “Les Petits Charlatans”, 1773

Jean Jacques de Boissieu (aka Jean Jacques de Boissieux) (1736–1810)

“Les Petits Charlatans” (The little Charlatans), 1773

Etching on buff-coloured chine collé on white wove paper trimmed with a small margin around the platemark and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 26.3 x 30.2 cm; (plate)  20.1 x 27 cm; (chine collé) 19.6 x 26.9 cm; (image borderline) 19.6 x 25.8 cm.

Inscribed in plate with the artist’s monogram and date at lower left corner.

State v (of v) with the added asterisk beside the date (state iv) and the dot between the artist’s monogram and the date (state v). Note that there are arguments to the number of states and the issue seems to rest with subtle changes to the dot between the monogram and the date.

Perez 67 (Marie-Félicie Perez 1994, “L'Oeuvre gravé de Jean-Jacques de Boissieu”, Geneva, Éditions du Tricorne, p. 154, cat. no. 67); IFF 67 (Département des Estampes 1930, “Inventaire du Fonds, Français: graveurs du XVIIe siècle”, Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale).

Perez offers the following description of this print:

(Google Transl.) “To the left of this print, on a theatre leaning against the ruins of the Arch of Titus, a charlatan, dressed as a Turk, shows the audience a pot he is holding in his right hand, at the height of his face. A young man, wearing an egret turban, carries under his arm a box and, on his left shoulder, the pole of a long flag, which hangs behind him to the ground. To the charlatan's left, three musicians call the audience; one of them, standing behind the others, is blowing the horn. Sixteen characters are grouped around the theatre. We notice, among them, a villager leaning on a stick, a woman carrying a child, and four standing on trestles. To the right of the second plan, near an open door in the fence wall of a garden, a beggar holds out his hand to a horseman; a house with a smoking chimney, a pepper-pot turret, a few trees, underbrush falling down a wall, people form the landscape in the background.” (p. 154).

I understand from Perez’s account of the development of this print that there is a drawing (in a private collection) that Boissieu made of the Arch of Titus when he was in Rome. Moreover, there is a drawing (in Frankfurt?) showing the figure on the left wearing a cap. Unsurprisingly, this scene with the Arch of Titus behind the performers is a pictorial concoction, as Perez advises: (transl.) “The result is quite heterogeneous and is not located in Rome, Lyon or Holland” (op. cit.). Interestingly, Perez adds the insight that Boissieu’s “process of assimilation” is in a way a pastiche of K. Dujardin.

See also the description of this print offered by the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1867-0309-435.

Condition: a well-printed chine collé impression showing some signs of wear to the printing plate with small margins laid upon a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet must once have been folded, but it is now flattened and is in excellent condition with no tears, holes, abrasions, stains or foxing.

I am selling this sensitively executed etching for AU$310 in total (currently US$228.39/EUR194.04/GBP166.06 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this 18th century scene of a theatrical performance, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Friday, 23 July 2021

Stefano della Bella’s etching, “Pole in Court Dress Leaning on a War Hammer”, c1645

Stefano della Bella (1610–1664)

“Pole in Court Dress Leaning on a War Hammer” (aka “Polish man seen from behind, other man in background” [Rijksmuseum title]), c1645, plate 19 from the series of 24 plates (including the title plate), “Diversi Capricci”, published in Paris by Nicolas I Langlois (1640–1703).

Etching on fine laid paper with a small margin on the top and sides and a larger margin below, backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 14.3 x 12 cm; (plate) 8.1 x 10 cm.

Inscribed in plate along the lower edge: (left): “19 Stef della Bella fecit”; (centre) “Cum priuil.”; (right) “N Langlois ex”.

State ii (of iii), lifetime impression before the change of publisher to Pierre Mariette I in state iii (see BM inv. no. X,5.182), or state iii (of iv) as catalogued by De Vesme/Massar (p. 44 [illust.]).

 De Vesme/Massar 146 (Alexandre de Vesme & Phyllis D. Massar, 1971, “Stefano della Bella. Catalogue Raisonné”, New York, Collectors Editions, [text] p. 72, cat. no. 146, [illust.] p. 44, cat. no. 146); Jombert (Della Bella)  139-19 (Charles Antoine Jombert 1772, “Essai d'un catalogue de l'oeuvre d'Etienne de la Belle, peintre et graveur florentin”, Paris, p. 141, cat. no. 139-19).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Plate 19; a Pole in court dress, standing in centre turned towards left leaning on a war hammer, with another Pole behind to right. c.1647 Etching” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_X-5-182). See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum: http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.76687.

Condition: a well-printed impression  with a small margin around the platemark on the top and sides and a generous margin below, laid onto a sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. There is a collector’s stamp verso.

I am selling this sensitively executed lifetime impression that may be small in physical size but is very grand in its projection of scale in the sense of wide open space—no doubt resulting at least in part from the “David and Goliath” difference of size between the two figures portrayed—for AU$233 (currently US$171.71/EUR145.83/GBP124.89 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this superb etching by one of the most famous of the old master printmakers, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold 










Thursday, 22 July 2021

Philips Galle’s engraving, “Protheus”, 1586

Philips Galle (aka Philippe Galle; Philippus Gallaeus) (1537–1612)

“Protheus” (aka “Proteus”), 1586, plate 5 from the first series of seventeen plates (TIB 5601.090:1–17; Hollstein 316-32), “Semideorum Marinorum Amnicorumque Sigillariæ Imagines Perelegantes” (aka “Sea and River Gods”), published by Philips Galle in Antwerp.

Edition-Originale.com offers a superb description of the publication of this series and images of the plates: https://www.edition-originale.com/en/antique-books-1455-1820/editions-originales/-semideorum-marinorum-amnicorumque-1586-50148.

Engraving on laid paper, trimmed around/slightly within the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 16.6 x 9.8 cm.

Lettered and numbered on plate below the image borderline: (left) “Phls Gall. Inuen./ et Sculp.”; (centre) “PROTHEVS.”; (right) “5.”

State i (of ii) Note that the attribution of this impression to the first state is based on the text line being the same as the first state impression held by the Rijksmuseum (RP-P-1898-A-19949).

TIB 5601.090:5 (Arno Dolders [ed.] 1987, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists: Philips Galle”, vol. 56, Supplement, New York, Abaris Books, p. 347, cat. no. [5601].090:5); New Hollstein Dutch 417-1 (2) (Marjolein Leesberg & Manfred Sellink [comp.] 2001, Rotterdam, “The New Hollstein: Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Philips Galle”, Sound and Vision, p. 114; p. 121 [fig.], cat. no. 417).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:

“Proteus as a nude male figure leaning against a large urn spilling water and fish; face in profile to the left, at his feet, various [shells] and fish on the shore; two flying fish to his right; a city by the shore in the background. 1586 Engraving” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1942-0720-1-27). See also the description offered by the Rijksmuseum: http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.114826.

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression trimmed around/slightly within the image borderline and laid upon a support sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The groin area of figure (Proteus) is abraded and seems to have a red trace (possibly a child in the past has added colour?) and the lower centre of the border has a spot of abrasion, otherwise the sheet is in a good condition with no tears, holes, folds, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this Renaissance period engraving showing the elusive sea god, Proteus, who (according to Homer in “The Odyssey” [iv: 355]) lives on the island of Pharos with the gift of prophecy and the interesting propensity  to shape-shift into an animal to avoid questions about the future, for AU$338 (currently US$248.94/EUR211.20/GBP181.25 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this marvellous print engraved only a couple of decades after Michelangelo put down his brushes after completing the “Last Judgement” in the Sistine Chapel, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Wednesday, 21 July 2021

“L. V.” (entourage of Charles Jacque), “Intérieur de Cuisine”, 1844

Unidentified French printmaker, “L. V.” (as inscribed in plate), working in the manner of Charles Jacque (aka Charles Émile Jacque; Charles Jaque) (1813–1894)

Intérieur de Cuisine” (Kitchen Interior), 1844, published in Paris for the art periodical of the Société Libre des Beaux-Arts, “Journal des Artistes: Annonce et compte rendu des ouvrages de peinture, sculpture, architecture, gravure, lithographie, poésie, musique et art dramatique”, January 1844, as the final plate in the publication; see view 393: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k423911m/f393.item.

Etching on heavy wove paper with margins as published, backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 21.3 x 27.8 cm; (plate) 17.9 x 26 cm; (image borderline) 13.5 x 20.3 cm.

Inscribed in plate within the image borderline: (upper right) “L. V. INV SC 1844”.

Lettered in plate above the image borderline: (centre) “JOURNAL DES ARTISTES”.

Lettered in plate below the image borderline: (centre) “Intérieur de Cuisine”.

Condition: a richly inked and well-printed impression with small margins around the platemark and laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. There are small tears in the margins and darkening to the left margin, but the image itself is in very good condition with no significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this this seldom seen etching on the art market showing the influence of the scenes of everyday life portrayed by the Barbizon School—especially Charles Jacque—for AU$221 (currently US$161.69/EUR137.27/GBP118.59 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this wonderfully intimate scene of rural domestic bliss featuring two happy little critters in the lower-left corner enjoying a meal—note the way that the cast shadow of their tails animates them and how this seemingly trivial detail gives the scene a spark of life—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Tuesday, 20 July 2021

(Designer) Matthias Scheits’ engraving, “The Seven Angels Pouring Out Their Vials”, 1672

(Designer) Matthias Scheits (aka Mathias Scheitz; Matthias Scheutz) (c1625/30–1700)

Unidentified engraver to the printing workshop of Von Stern'sche Druckerei (1580–). Note that there were fourteen engravers working for this workshop and the quality of this particular engraving suggests the possibility of the hand of Melchior Küsel (1674/7–1738) who engraved many of the Old Testament scenes but not those of the New Testament.

“The Seven Angels Pouring Out Their Vials”, 1672, from the series of 153 engravings printed in Lüneburg by Von Stern'sche Druckerei from the intermediary design by Matthias Scheits, published in 1672 by Johann Stern (1582–1656) and Heinrich Stern (1592–1665) in the “Scheitssche Bibel” (aka “Sceits Bible").

Engraving (and etching?) on laid paper trimmed with a small margin around the platemark on the top and sides and along the platemark on the lower edge, backed with a support sheet.

Size: (sheet) 23.9 x 19.6 cm; (image borderline) 23 x 17.9 cm.

Lettered in plate: (upper edge) “The Seven Angels Pouring Out Their Vials. Revel. XVI. 1.21.”; (lower edge) “Apocal. Les Sept Anges versent leurs Phioles. […] N.T. 66./XVI. 1 – 21. De zeven Engelen gieten hunne fioolen uit.”

Condition: a strong early impression showing minimal wear to the printing plate, trimmed around the platemark with a small margin on the top and sides and laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. Beyond restoration of the lower left corner, the sheet is in a good condition with no foxing or significant stains.

I am selling this this fascinating engraving showing the beast of the apocalypse expelling the plagues while angels pour the plagues from the heavens, for AU$222 (currently US$162.62/EUR138.05/GBP119.22 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this beautifully executed engraving, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold