Gallery of prints for sale

Thursday, 19 September 2019

Jacob Matham's engraving, “The Four Elements”, 1588


(attrib.) Jacob Matham (1571–1631)

“The Four Elements”, 1588, after Hendrik Goltzius (aka Hendrick Goltzius) (1558–1617), plate 1 from the series of eight engravings (TIB 278–283), “Mythological Subjects”, published by Hendrik Goltzius in Haarlem.

Engraving on laid paper trimmed along the image borderline (with the text lines) and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 30.2 x 21 cm; (image borderline) 29.3 x 21 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline along lower edge: (left): "1”; (right) “HGoltzius inue./ et excud. Ao. 1588”.
Inscribed on plate below the image borderline in two lines of Latin text in two columns: “Sub cęlo Pater omnipotens Elementa …/ …// …/ …Nectar alit.”
State i (of iii) before the change of the publisher’s address.

TIB 4 (3). 278 (200) (Walter L Strauss [ed.] 1980, "The Illustrated Bartsch 4: Netherlandish Artists”, vol. 4, New York, Abaris Books, p. 255, cat. No. 278 [200]); New Hollstein Dutch 348-1(3) (Huigen Leeflang [ed.] Léna Widerkehr [comp.] 2007–08, “The New Hollstein : Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450-1700: Jacob Matham”, vol. 3, Ouderkerk aan den IJssel, Sound and Vision, p. 101, cat. no. 348); Hollstein 237.I; Hollstein 266-273 (after Goltzius); New Hollstein (Dutch & Flemish) 641.I (Hendrick Goltzius; Prints after inventions by Goltzius).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“Plate 1: The Four Elements. Allegorical scene with Fire in top right corner (as naked man with flaming crown, seated on a dragon and holding a rock and lightning in his hands), Air in top left corner (as a naked woman with cloudy hair, seated on billowing clouds, a lizard on her right hand), Earth in lower left corner (as a man, seen from behind, with plants on his head and holding reed and fruits), Water at centre (as a naked woman with a model of a ship on her head and holding a conch); first state published by Goltzius; after Goltzius.”

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print:
(Transl.) “The four elements Earth, Water, Air and Fire, personified as two female and two male figures. Left in the foreground, seen from the back, is Earth (Terra) with grain shovels in his hand. Water (Aqua) is also in the foreground as a female figure with a ship on her head and a stream beside her. In the sky between the clouds is Lucht (Aer) with a chameleon on her hand. At the back right a male figure depicting Fire (Ignis), sitting on a dragon and on his head a crown of flames. The sun is behind his head.”

Condition: richly inked and well-printed first state (lifetime) impression trimmed to the image borderline and laid upon an archival support sheet of millennium quality washi paper. There are restorations to the lower left corner, the text box below the image borderline and the upper corners.

I am selling this superb engraving, glowing with strong tonal contrast and exemplifying the period style of Mannerism of the late 16th century, for AU$420 in total (currently US$285.38/EUR258.30/GBP227.81 at the time of posting this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this rare first state engraving personifying the four elements, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Jan Sadeler I's engraving, “Phyllis and Aristotle”, c1590


Jan Sadeler I (aka Johannes Sadeler; Johann Sadeler) (1550–1600)

“Phyllis and Aristotle”, 1586–1595, after a lost drawing by Bartholomeus Spranger (1546–1611) with privilege from Rudolf II of Habsburg, published by Jan Sadeler (I) in Haarlem.

For those wondering about this curious scene, the chap wearing a bridle is the great philosopher Aristotle and the whip wielding lady riding him is Phyllis—Alexander the Great’s lover! From what I understand, Phyllis was not pleased with Aristotle’s advice to Alexander that Alexander should focus on his philosophical studies rather than be intimately attentive to Phyllis. As the story goes, Phyllis expressed her displeasure in Aristotle by literally riding him. Unbeknownst to Phyllis, Alexander, was secretly watching her inventive game of retribution.
(Note: this account is based on the allegorical story about Alexander concocted by the 14th century Dominican, John Herold, for his sermons.)

Engraving on fine laid paper with wide margins backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 39.6 x 28.8 cm; (plate) 29.9 x 22 cm; (image borderline) 26.8 x 21.4 cm
Inscribed on plate along lower edge: (left) “Bl Sprangers Inu: [JS entwined]adl: fec. et exc:/ cu[m] gratia et priuil: Sac:e Caes. M.”; (right) Nuk studium …/ … regat.”
State i (of i)

TIB 7001.447 (Isabelle de Ramaix 2003, “The Illustrated Bartsch: Johan Sadeler I”, vol. 70, Part 3 [Supplement], Abaris Books, pp. 18–20); Hollstein Dutch 488 (K.G. Boon [ed.] Dieuwke de Hoop Scheffer [comp.] 1980, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts ca. 1450–1700: Aegidius Sadeler to Raphael Sadeler II”, vol. 21, Amsterdam, Van Gendt & Co, p. 162, cat. no. 488).

See the following descriptions of this print:
The Rijksmuseum:
The Metropolitan Museum of Art:
The Philadelphia Museum of Art:

Condition: slightly silvery impression with a few dot restorations otherwise in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing). The sheet has generous margins and is laid on a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this visually arresting engraving after Bartholomeus Spranger—a highly influential artist whose stylistic exaggerations were later termed “Sprangerism” in the works of artists like Hendrick Goltzius—for AU$460 (currently USD312.69/EUR282.61/GBP250.15 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this masterwork of engraving by one of the most famous of the Flemish old master printmakers and after an equally famous artist, Bartholomeus Spranger, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Wednesday, 18 September 2019

Morgan Dennis' drypoint, “When do we eat?”, c1925


Morgan Dennis (1892–1960)

“When do we eat?”, c1925, featured in the advertisement campaign for Texaco Oils (see https://www.texaco.com/history), “Drain Fill and then Listen.”

Note: Hamshere Gallery attributes the date of execution of this print as c1925. This date seems realistic as a Texaco advertisement featuring this design was published in April, 1932 on the back of “The Literary Digest”. Regarding this print, Hamshere Gallery offers the following information:
“…Texaco Company bought the copyright and distributed complimentary copies of ‘Listen’ through ‘The Texaco Exhibit, Central Pier, 1400 Broadwalk, Atlantic City’. Sculptures titled ‘Listen’ were also produced.

Etching and drypoint on cream wove paper, signed in the plate at lower left and in pencil at lower right.
Size: (sheet) 14.2 x 18.9 cm; (plate) 8.6 x 12.6 cm.
Inscribed on plate: (lower left corner) “MORGAN DENNIS -”
Signed in pencil by the artist below the platemark at lower right.

See a brief description of this print auctioned at Sotheby’s on 21 March 2013, London: http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2013/mark-birley-collection/lot.141.html

Condition: richly inked and well-printed impression, signed in the plate and in pencil in the lower margin. There are minor marks verso from previous mounting, otherwise the sheet is in near pristine condition.

I am selling this gorgeous etching capturing these very cute terriers’ request to be fed through the slightest tilt of their heads—a subtle feat of non-verbal communication matching the artist’s label design for “Black & White Whiskey” featuring another pair of Scottish terriers—for the total cost of AU$340 (currently US$232.81/EUR210.52/GBP186.72 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this small, but powerfully expressive and beautifully executed print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.











Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Christian Wilhelm Ernst Dietricy's etching, “St James Preaching in a Village”, 1740


Christian Wilhelm Ernst Dietricy (aka Christian Wilhelm Ernst Dietrich) (1712–1774)
“St James Preaching in a Village” (aka " Heilige Jakobus Predict” [Rijksmuseum title]; “Preaching of St. James” [DIA title]), 1740, plate 76 from “Oeuvre de C.W.E. Dietrich”, published in Dresden, c1775.

Regarding the biographical details of St James the Greater (aka Jacobus Maior; St James of Compostela; St James the Moorslayer; Boanerges; Santiago) portrayed in this etching, the British Museum offers the following insights:
“Christian saint, apostle and New Testament figure; son of Zebedee (q.v.) and brother of St John the Evangelist (q.v.), beheaded by Herod Agrippa I (q.v.). He later miraculously appeared to fight for the Christian army during the battle of Clavijo in 844AD during the Reconquista, hence called Matamoros (Moorslayer). Patron saint of Spain; symbol a staff.”

Etching on laid paper with small margins around the image borderline and backed with a support sheet.
Size: (sheet) 19.6 x 27.7 cm; (plate) 19 x 27 cm; (image borderline) 18.3 x 26.5 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline: (upper left corner) “76”; (upper right) ‘“Dietricy f. 1740”.
State iii (of iv) with the addition of artists name of the second state and the plate number “76” of the third state.

Linck 30–III(4) (JF Linck 1846, “Monographie der von C. W. E. Dietrich radierten, geschabten und in Holz geschnittenen malerischen Vorstellungen”, Berlin, pp. 88–90, cat. no. 30); LeBlanc 19–III(4) (Ch. LeBlanc & J.Ch. Brunet 1854 [–1889], “Manuel de l'amateur d'estampes, contenant un dictionnaire des graveurs de toutes les nations : ouvrage destiné à faire suite au Manuel du libraire”, vol. 2, p. 128, cat. no. 19).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print:
“St James preaching; the latter is standing on a stone block outside a rural house to right, holding a cross in his right hand; group of onlookers to left; church in the background to left; third state. 1740 Etching”

See also the description of this print at the Rijksmuseum:

Condition: richly inked and well-printed faultless impression with a small margin around the plate mark in excellent conditions for the age of the print (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, significant stains or foxing). The sheet is laid on a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper.

I am selling this outstanding—museum quality—impression exemplifying the artist’s Rembrandtesque skill in guiding a viewer’s reading of a complex crowd scene by varying the amount of details shown, for the total cost of AU$320 (currently US$219.54/EUR199.19/GBP176.36 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world.

If you are interested in purchasing this unassuming masterwork of etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold











Monday, 16 September 2019

Joseph Parrocel's etching, “Baptism of Christ”, c1661


Joseph Parrocel (1646–1704)

“Baptism of Christ” (aka “Jesus Christ is baptized by Saint John”; “Baptême du Christ” [Louvre title]), c1661, plate 4 from the series of forty plates, “Les Miracles de la Vie de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ” (The Miracles of the Life of Our Lord Jesus Christ).

Etching on laid paper trimmed within the plate mark and backed with a support sheet.
Compare trimmed losses with the impression held by the Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts graphiques (RF 41551.9):
Size: (sheet) 15.4 x 16.4 cm.
Inscribed on plate within the image borderline along the lower edge: (left) “I. Par. in. et f.”; (right) “C.P.R.”
Inscribed on plate below the image borderline: “IESVS CHRIST est baptize par Sainct Jean”.

State i (of ii) lifetime impression of the etched state of the plate before it was later engraved in the second state with significant changes to Christ’s position (see discussion further below).
Robert-Dumesnil in the catalogue raisonné for this set of prints advises that the first state impressions of “pure etching” are “rare.”

Arguably, this impression is very likely to have been printed by the artist’s own hand as the inventory of his possession (dated 16 July, 1704) reveals that the artist possessed in the cellar of his house a “press in oak wood” to print his plates.

Robert-Dumesnil 1838 44(4) (A P F Robert-Dumesnil 1838, Le Peintre-Graveur Français, vol. 3, Paris, p. 266, cat. no. 44 [4]).

Robert-Dumesnil in the catalogue raisonné (1838) offers the following description of this print:
(Transl.) “The Redeemer standing in the Jordan, in the middle of the print, receives the holy water that John, kneeling to his left, pours on him, looking up to heaven where God the Father and the Holy Spirit appear surrounded by a celestial legion. Two great angels are prostrate at the bottom left.” (p. 266).

Interestingly, Christ’s position shown in this impression is changed significantly in the second state as described by Robert-Dumesnil (1838):
(Transl.) “Christ inclines his head to the left, to the two prostrate angels.”
(See a second state impression held by the Louvre:

Condition: a superb, richly inked and well-printed impression of the utmost rarity, trimmed within the platemark with losses to the sides and lower text lines and backed with a support of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in excellent condition (i.e. there are no tears, holes, folds, abrasions, stains or foxing).

I am selling this first state etching before it was later “finished” with engraving, for AU$220 in total (currently US$151.18/EUR136.97/GBP121.47 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this exceptionally rare old master print, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold