Gallery of prints for sale

Friday, 30 September 2022

Jacques Callot’s etching, “The Blind Man and His Companion”, 1622/3

Jacques Callot (1592–1635)

“The Blind Man and His Companion” (aka “L'Aveugle et Son Compagnon”), 1622/3, first state lifetime impression (before numbering as plate “9”) from the series of 25 etchings, “Les Gueux” (aka “The Beggars”; “Les Mendiants”; “Les Baroni”; “Les Barons”; “Bedelaars”).

Etching on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet providing wide margins.

Size: (support sheet) 33.4 x 25.5 cm; (sheet) 14 x 9.2 cm.

State i (of ii) before the plate number, “9”, is added in the second state.

Lieure 487 i (Jules Lieure 1989, “Jacques Callot: Catalogue Raisonné de l’Oeuvre Gravé”, vol. 1 [text], San Francisco, Alan Wofsy Fine Arts, p. 43, cat. no. 487 1er Etat); Meaume 693 i (Édouard Meaume 1860, “Recherches sur la vie et les ouvrages de Jacques Callot”, Paris, cat. no. 693).

The Rijksmuseum offers the following description of this print: “Two men dressed in rags, the one on the left holding a hat and holding the hand of the right, who is blind. This print is part of a series of 25 prints with beggars and vagabonds, such as Callot probably saw in Italy” (http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.40788).

See also the description of this print offered by the British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1861-0713-930.

Condition: a strong and well-printed (near faultless) impression laid onto a sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper providing wide margins. The sheet is in an excellent condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains, but a previous collector’s pencil notations on verso are visible through the fine paper.

I am selling this superb etching showcasing Callot’s use of the échoppe etching needle that he invented allowing etchers to create lines that may swell, thin and taper to finely pointed ends like those found in engraved lines, for the total cost of AU$312 (currently US$202.93/EUR206.58/GBP181.82 the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this near faultless first state impression of an etching by one of the most important and innovative of the old master printmakers, showing two beggars with the one on the left (according to Jules Lieure's [1989] description) singing to arouse the charity of passers-by, to whom he extends his hat while also supporting his blind companion, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold










Thursday, 29 September 2022

Théodule Ribot’s etching and drypoint with aquatint, “Still Life with Dead Chicken”, 1878

Théodule Ribot (Théodule Augustin Ribot) (1823–1891)

“Still Life with Dead Chicken” (aka “Stilleven met dode kip”; “Nature morte” [published title]), 1878, artist’s proof (number 3) signed in ink by the artist with dedication to the French art critic and writer with whom Ribot collaborated (see Beraldi, vol. XI, p. 196), Louis de Fourcaud (aka Louis Jean Olivier Marie de Boussès de Fourcaud) 1851–1914), before lettering with title and publication details for Veuve Cadart (fl.1875–1882) (aka Alfred Cadart [1828–1875]) in Paris.

Etching with drypoint and aquatint on laid paper with wide margins and inscribed in ink by the artist: “3ème épreuve à mon ami De Fourcaud Th. Ribot” (3rd test to my friend De Fourcaud Th. Ribot).

Size: (sheet) 24.7 x 34.9 cm; (plate) 19.6 x 27.5 cm; (image borderline) 13.3 x 22.4 cm.

Inscribed in plate within the image borderline: (lower right corner) “t. Ribot”.

State i (of ii?) before lettering with title and publication details

The Rijksmuseum offers a description of this print: http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.229864.   

See also the insights about Ribot offered by Henri Béraldi (1891), “Les Graveurs du XIXe Siècle: Guide de l'Amateur d'Estampes Modernes”, vol. XI, Paris, Librairie L. Conquet, pp. 195–96.

Condition: a richly inked and near faultless impression with generously wide margins. Beyond faint spots of foxing, the sheet is in a good condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this very strong hand-inscribed in ink artist’s proof (before lettering) showing a plucked and extended chicken prepared for cooking, for AU$356 (currently US$230.18/EUR238.07/GBP213.15 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this graphically powerful etching executed with great confidence and economy of line, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

Note that I have listed another etching by Ribot that is (surprisingly) still available: “Paysanne de l'Ukraine”, 1886 (see https://www.printsandprinciples.com/2022/06/theodule-ribots-etching-paysanne-de.html). 











Wednesday, 28 September 2022

Ary Cornelius Renan’s etching, “La Douleur d'Orphée”, c1900


Ary Cornelius Renan (1858–1900)

“La Douleur d'Orphée” (The Pain of Orpheus), c1900, published unsigned in the art periodical, “Gazette des Beaux-Arts” in 1903.

Etching printed in Umber ink on laid paper backed with a support sheet providing wide margins.

Size: (support sheet) 44.9 x 33.5 cm; (sheet) 27.1 x 17.3 cm; (plate) 23 x 15.9; (image borderline) 15.9 x 12.9 cm.

Graves International Art offers a brief description of this print: https://www.artsy.net/artwork/cornelius-ary-renan-la-douleur-dorphee.

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression laid onto a sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. The sheet is in an excellent condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains

I am selling this very finely hatched etching—so fine that at first glance I thought it must be an aquatint—showing Orpheus cradling his lyre against a tree while he is in great distress at the death of his wife, Eurydice: “When Orpheus kissed the lifeless hand / Her soul had gone to another land, / His lungs gulped air as if to cry, / But he could not cry. / His eyes were dry.” (Invicto Deus [2015] “Orpheus”), for AU$212 (currently US$135.41/EUR141.58/GBP126.79 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries.

If you are interested in purchasing this very beautiful and unusual etching, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.










Tuesday, 27 September 2022

Comte de Caylus & Nicolas Le Sueur’s “Discovery of the True Cross”, c1729/64, after Bernardino Pintoricchio

Anne Claude Philippe Comte de Caylus (1692–1765) (etching component) in collaboration with Nicolas Le Sueur (1690–1764) (aquatint component)

“Discovery of the True Cross” (aka “l'Invention de la Croix”; “Discovery of the True Cross by St Helena”), c1729/64, plate 3 from the series, “Recueil d'estampes d'après les plus beaux tableaux et d'après les plus beaux desseins qui sont en France” (Collection of prints from the most beautiful paintings and from the most beautiful designs that are in France) (aka “Recueil Crozat”; “Cabinet Crozat”), after a drawing by Bernardino Betti Biagi Pintoricchio (aka Bernardino Betti Biagi Pinturicchio) (c1454–1513), published by François Basan (1723–1797) in 1764.

Etching and aquatint with tone woodblock imitating a chiaroscuro woodcut, printed in two shades of blue with black on heavy laid paper with wide margins.

Size: (sheet) 46.8 x 37.2 cm; (plate) 41 x 32 cm; (image borderline) 34.4 x 31.3 cm.

Regarding the publication of the series, “Recueil Crozat”, the Curator of the British Museum offers the following insights: “… a series of plates commissioned by Crozat [Pierre Crozat (1665–1740)] … reproducing famous paintings and drawings of the era; 140 plates were published in 1729. A second volume formed by 42 prints (instead of the 110 plates initially planned) was issued in 1740.

After Crozat's death, the plates were sold to a company of booksellers who commissioned Mariette to reorganize the 'Recueil'; Mariette divided the plates into two volumes, added some missing descriptions, and advertised the set to the public in 1742.

In 1764, Basan [François Basan (1723–1797)] bought the plates and the text, and republished the 'Recueil', but replaced the woodcuts by intaglio prints. … where an attempt to imitate the effect of a chiaroscuro woodcut is made by using aquatint instead …” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1907-1121-14).

Lettered in plate below the image borderline: (centre) “l'Invention de la Croix./ 'D'après le dessein de Bernardin Pinturicchio, qui est dans le Cabinet de Mr. Crozat/ gravé en bois par Nicolas le Sueur”; (right) “3.**”

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “The invention of the Cross, or the discovery of the True Cross by St Helena, after a drawing attributed on plate to Pinturicchio: three men lifting a cross; two are standing in a trench, the third one is kneeling on the edge at right. c.1729/64/ Aquatint imitating a chiaroscuro woodcut, printed in two shades of brown, on etched lines (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1855-0609-82).

See also the description of this print offered by the Metropolitan Museum of Art: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/698050.

Condition: a strong and well-printed impression in excellent condition with no tears, holes, folds, losses, abrasions, significant stains or foxing.

I am selling this curiosity of an intaglio print (viz. etching with aquatint) that is skilfully crafted to imitate a chiaroscuro woodcut (i.e., a woodcut involving more than one tone of a colour) for AU$296 (currently US$191.90/EUR199.54/GBP177.81 at the time of posting this print) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this technically important print showcasing a somewhat deceptive practice of the 1700s, please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy (but not, of course, any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

This print has been sold











Monday, 26 September 2022

Karel Dujardin’s etching, “Two Pigs”, 1656


Karel Dujardin (aka Karel Du Jardin; Carel Dujardin; Carel du Jardin; Bokkebaart) (1626–1678)

“Two Pigs” (TIB title) (aka “Two Hogs”; “Twee Zwijnen”; “Les deux Cochons”), 1656,  plate 15 (as inscribed in plate).

Etching on fine laid paper trimmed along the platemark and backed with a support sheet.

Size: (support sheet) 28.8 x 32.2 cm; (sheet) 12.3 x 15.4 cm; (image borderline) 10.7 x 14.9 cm.

Inscribed in plate: (upper left corner) “K. DU Jardin fe. [165]6”; (lower right corner)
 “15.”

State ii (of ii) with the addition of the plate number.

TIB 1.15 (173) (Leonard J Slatkes [ed.] 1978, The Illustrated Bartsch: Netherlandish Artists, vol. 1, New York, Abaris Books, p. 185, cat. no. 15 [173]); Hollstein 15 ii (F.W.H. Hollstein 1952, “Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts 1450–1700: Douffet–Floris”, vol. 6, Amsterdam, Menno Hertzberger, cat. no. 15).

The British Museum offers the following description of this print: “Two hogs. One sleeping on the left in front of a [pigsty], with his head foremost, the other facing right and standing almost in profile to right; second state. 1656 /Etching” (https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_Sheepshanks-845)

See also the description of this print offered by the Rijksmuseum: http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.38308.

Condition: a well-printed impression trimmed along the platemark and laid onto a sheet of archival (millennium quality) washi paper. Beyond a pale stain on the lower right borderline, the sheet is in a good condition with no tears, holes, folds, abrasions or significant stains.

I am selling this sensitively executed etching of rural life in the 1600s, showing two male pigs beside a pigsty, for AU$226 (currently US$146.70/EUR152.20/GBP136.86 at the time of this listing) including postage and handling to anywhere in the world, but not (of course) any import duties/taxes imposed by some countries).

If you are interested in purchasing this closely observed scene—beyond the superb rendering of the pigs with their coarse coats of bristly hair, note the exquisite and detailed depiction of plants in the foreground—please contact me (oz_jim@printsandprinciples.com) and I will send you a PayPal invoice to make the payment easy.

This print has been sold